What do we know about the years between ST5 and ST6?

Discussion in 'Star Trek Movies I-X' started by Roboturner913, Jul 30, 2013.

  1. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    Good comparison.
     
  2. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

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    Hmm. Do we have an onscreen counterindication to the McCoy divorce/Joanna element in the prime timeline, the way we have a counterindication to Uhura's language skills in ST6?

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  3. Peach Wookiee

    Peach Wookiee Cuddly Mod of Doom Moderator

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    I personally think Uhura being a polyglot makes sense. If you're a comm officer encountering new life forms and the captain needs to talk to them, s/he needs you to do his job.
     
  4. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk The Real Me Premium Member

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    You just need to know which settings to input on the Universal Translator.
     
  5. Praetor

    Praetor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Why can't it be both? Why can't linguistics be something she was indeed interested in, but to do her job all she really needed was to flip a switch and be able to service the equipment itself? Knowing other languages thus ended up being almost a bonus...
     
  6. Tomalak

    Tomalak Vice Admiral Admiral

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    And indeed, Uhura's first name.
     
  7. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

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    It most certainly can, but as per ST6:TUC, it apparently isn't.

    If Uhura did have an ear and a pair of lips for languages, it would seem somewhat probable that she'd tackle the all-important Klingon language at some point. Since she's about as fluent in the Klingon tongue as I'm in French, the odds of her mastering a large number of other languages would appear to go down somewhat.

    It remains to be seen how different the two Uhuras ultimately are. Can nuUhura sing or dance? Can she bypass a transtator circuit with a hairpin?

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  8. Praetor

    Praetor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Sad but true, the TUC scene really throws a monkey wrench in the whole works.

    Maybe Klingon's just a really, really hard language? Surely such a brilliant people as the Kli--err, nevermind.
     
  9. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

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    Well, Russian is difficult as such - and the Russian spoken by the rank and file of the military is nearly impenetrable, combining jail slang with pop culture references and colonial influences from the Caucasus and whatnot. If the Klingon Empire is to be a good analogy to the Soviet Union at its point of collapse, a good command of textbook Klingon might be about as useful in deciphering the utterings of the Morska crew as a good command of textbook Mandarin.

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  10. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I would have liked to have seen Enterprise survive ST III, then head back to Earth under escort in ST IV, and have that do the time travel. The other ships race out ahead to meet the probe and are disabled.


    As thanks for the effort, she is refitted once again at the end.
     
  11. Praetor

    Praetor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Interesting notion. How would you have her survive self-destruction in TSFS?
     
  12. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

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    Or, what would you replace the self-destruct scene with, in terms of dramatic impact that the movie so desperately tried to achieve? Klingons kill not just David, but Saavik as well? Klingons kill Chekov (by accident, I presume)? Sarek dies before Spock is revived? Genesis revives not just Spock, but Khan as well?

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  13. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    Agreed. The sacrifice of the Enterprise is possibly the most dramatic and memorable moment in the TSFS. It wouldn't want to lose it.
     
  14. jpv2000

    jpv2000 Captain Captain

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    Same here. Brought tears to my eyes, the first time I saw it.
     
  15. trevanian

    trevanian Rear Admiral

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    For me this has just always been implicit. I remember getting to read SPOCK MUST DIE! when I was 13 or so and not thinking twice about Uhura being the one to suggest coding messages to Starfleet that would fool Klingons with the aid of Eurish, the 'language' created by novelist James Joyce.

    Damn, it has been 40 years and I still want to see a TREK space battle as good as the one in that little book (or better still, the one early on in THE WOUNDED SKY.)
     
  16. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

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    Not only in those issues -- pretty much every issue of the 1989 relaunch (with the new issue #1) is set post-TFF, leading up to the events of TUC, including Captain Sulu's first major mission after taking command of the Excelsior.

    The NCC-1701-A article at Memory Beta lays out virtually every last mission undertaken by the starship from 2286 to 2293:

    http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/USS_Enterprise_%28NCC-1701-A%29

    To answer the original poster's question, the types of missions performed by the Enterprise-A spanned the entire gamut, from routine exploration, to intervention in numerous interstellar wars, planetary evacuations, ferrying diplomats, border-peacekeeping duties, and things like covert extraction missions in non-friendly space (including that of the Romulans).

    The vast majority of known stories set aboard the Enterprise-A were actually told in the pages of the two DC Comics series, from early 1987 to 1988, and then from 1989 to 1996.

    Chronologically speaking, the series covered much of that vessel's eight-year service history, from early 2286 (immediately post-ST IV) to at least 2290 (we see Sulu's commmand-taking of the Excelsior during the series, and him leaving the Enterprise-A behind forever), but it appeared to end maybe a year or two prior to the events of Star Trek VI (though still working characters like Admiral Cartwright and Valeris into those pre-movie storylines).

    By contrast, we actually received very, very few original prose stories set aboard the Enterprise-A in the Pocket novel series, not counting the movie novelizations themselves.


    Same here. It's one of the most fascinating time periods in Star Trek from a characterization standpoint, occurring as it does in the aftermath of the rather traumatic "Genesis trilogy" (Spock's death and resurrection, Kirk's son murdered, the first Enterprise destroyed, Earth threatened, Kirk demoted, and a brand-new Enterprise commissioned, plus deteriorating galactic relations with the Klingon Empire), which could allow for a great deal of emotional depth to be mined.

    Indeed, Dayton Ward proved this to be the case with his post-Star Trek V novel (In the Name of Honor), which is set in a time period that not many novel authors have ventured into.

    One request (as a longtime fan), Greg: If you do decide to write this book, please spit in the eye of decades of former Paramount policy, and work in as many references to the DC Comics run as you possibly can...the children will thank you. :techman:
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2013
  17. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

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    Regarding the dating of The Final Frontier, there's a definite canonical establishment of the events of film taking place in 2287 in the TNG episode "Evolution" -- Data mentions that the last major wide-scale computer-failure aboard a Federation starship occurred in this year, which was a clear reference to the NCC-1701-A's computer troubles (the fifth movie was released in theaters only a couple of months before the broadcast of this episode).

    The dating of The Voyage Home is locked in by dialogue from the episode "The Neutral Zone" -- Data establishes the year as being 2364; according to various TNG production documents, the series is set 78 years after the events of that film, which places TVH's opening scenes in March, 2286 at the absolute earliest.

    You're correct about the apparent time lapse during the final sections of Star Trek IV, although it's probably on a much lesser scale -- weeks or months almost certainly pass between the HMS Bounty's reappearance with the whales and Captain Kirk taking command of the Enterprise-A, possibly between that scene and the trial, or else between the verdict and the final Spacedock scene.

    Starfleet would've needed weeks, at the very least, to repaint the outer hull of the new Enterprise to reflect the new fleet service-registry number.

    Not really -- in fact, if anything, the movie suggests that the crew is still regularly involved in the operation of the starship.

    The Spacedock launch-scene alone appears to confirm that the Gorkon peace-mission is simply one more recent routine mission for Kirk and his crew, suggested by how quickly and nonchalantly they take their stations, get the vessel prepped for departure, etc.

    True, they've been serving together as a cohesive unit for years by that point, but the movie shows Kirk treating the whole thing with almost a lazy, detached air...a milk-run, at best.


    It was a combination of a couple of factors -- as Timo mentions, there were a series of attacks perpetrated by the prototype Bird-of-Prey commanded by General Chang (the IKS Dakronh) in the months leading up to Star Trek VI, including the destruction of a Federation research-base where Carol Marcus is terribly wounded (from the ST VI novelization).

    The other occurred in 2287, not long after the events of The Final Frontier, where Kirk and Sulu witness the massacre of an entire Klingon penal colony under orders from the Imperial government merely to cover up the Empire's illegal detention of UFP civilians and captured Starfleet personnel. The incident so disgusts Captain Kirk that it sours his entire attitude towards the Klingons, leading into the sixth feature film (chronicled in the TOS novel In the Name of Honor).
     
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2013
  18. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

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    Pretty much -- the starship is in continuous service from 2286 until the events of Star Trek VI, as depicted in the DC Comics run, with no real interruption of command-structure (Captain Kirk retains command throughout the comic series), and other non-DC comics likewise depict Kirk leading the starship on routine exploratory missions as late as 2292 (in the Wildstorm run).


    The PC game Starfleet Academy (released in 1997) actually expands further upon this notion -- in the live-action footage featuring Shatner, Takei, and Koenig, Sulu takes a temporary position away from the Enterprise-A as guest instructor at the Academy prior to his upcoming promotion to the captaincy.
     
  19. Nightowl1701

    Nightowl1701 Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I second Leto II's call, Greg - those DC comic stories were great. :)
     
  20. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

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    Although pretty much all non-filmic sources (such as the DC series and the novels) depict the Enterprise-A in continuous, regular operational service as a front-line tactical command cruiser and exploratory vessel.

    That being said, the "troubleshooter" designation is actually quite accurate as a descriptor for the duties Captain Kirk and his crew performed during those years -- rather than a "traditional" five-year long-term mission of exploration, it's very much like The Final Frontier suggests, in that Starfleet Command frequently "needs Jim Kirk" to carry out most of the toughest assignments (from diplomacy to preventing wide-scale interplanetary wars).

    Indeed, many of the stories told in the DC series (and in novels like Probe) far eclipse TFF in scope, despite its ambitions -- those eight years contain some of the biggest missions of the "classic" Enterprise crew's career, but they're probably also the most frequently overlooked, in terms of attention paid to other eras (the TOS television-era missions, etc.).


    Be sure to check out the NCC-1701-A entry at Memory Beta -- not only does it feature every prose story (i.e., the Pocket novels) featuring that starship, but also every known graphic/comic book story, integrated and organized by year of operational service history:

    http://memory-beta.wikia.com/wiki/USS_Enterprise_%28NCC-1701-A%29