volcanoes and history

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by varek, May 24, 2014.

  1. varek

    varek Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2009
    Location:
    Danville, IN, USA
    I just came across something interesting. Some scientists think that the Archiflegreo volcano, near Naples, Italy, erupted c. 37,000-35,000 BC, driving out or eliminating Neanderthals there. This may have opened the door for modern humans (Aurignacians) to arrive there.

    http://popular-archaeology.com/issue...g-the-uluzzian

    A similar fate apparently befell the Minoan culture, c. 1450 BC, when the Akrotiri/Santorini volcano erupted, and the Myceneaeans invaded them.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Akrotiri_(Santorini)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minoan_chronology

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mycenaean_Greece


    (I think this is what caused the tsunami that drowned the Pharaoh's chariots during the Israelites' exodus from Egypt!)

    Interesting how some cultures may benefit from a major climatic event, while others lose out, isn't it?
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2014
  2. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2010
    Krakatau has had a hand in history as well:
    http://www.ees.lanl.gov/geodynamics/Wohletz/Krakatau.htm
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Krakatoa#535_AD_event (Kapi)
    http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/krakatau/books.html

    Tambora and Laki came within a few years of each other
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tambora_volcano_eruption_in_1815#1815_eruption
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laki#1783_eruption

    Humans barely survived this sucker
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toba_eruption

    Not even Yellowstone compares with flood basalt volcanism of the Deccan and Siberian traps.