USS Enterprise to retire

Discussion in 'Star Trek - Original Series' started by A beaker full of death, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. Knight Templar

    Knight Templar Commodore

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    Nautilus wasn't in service for 50 years either.

    It isn't just the reactors. It is all the engine related machinery that has been in close proximity to the reactors for decades and has itself become irradiated.

    And it isn't like the U.S. or anyone else has any experience with mothballing or preserving a nuclear powered warship even remotely the size of the Enterprise.
     
  2. Patrick O'Brien

    Patrick O'Brien Captain Captain

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    Too bad there is so much contamination from the reactors. It would be awesome to see the ship become a museum. Do the sailors who worked in those areas suffer from major health problems?
     
  3. Knight Templar

    Knight Templar Commodore

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    If I recall correctly, standard operating procedure is for U.S. sailors who work aboard a nuclear powered vessel in close proximity to the reactors wear radiation detection devices that monitor their daily total exposure to radiation. The readings are turned into the ships medical staff daily and if their exposure exceeds a certain level, they are reassigned. Some may be reassigned only for a certain period such as a week or a month, while if a sailor gets near a lifetime dosage of allowed radiation exposure he/she may be reassigned permanently.

    It isn't like the old Soviet Navy that had basically a "fry till you die" mentality.
     
  4. Patrick O'Brien

    Patrick O'Brien Captain Captain

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    Thanks for the info Knight. It is very unerving to think about. I would hope they get extra pay for this health hazard?
     
  5. Knight Templar

    Knight Templar Commodore

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    I don't remember if they get hazardous duty pay or not. Note that ALL people that serve aboard U.S. submarines have to specifically volunteer for the assignment. They don't force anyone.

    Don't think that has been true aboard nuclear powered aircraft carriers and the nine nuclear powered cruisers the U.S. used to have deployed.