Tips for writing a great Star Trek fanfiction story or series.

Discussion in 'Fan Fiction' started by surak-toc, Apr 9, 2014.

  1. JarodRussell

    JarodRussell Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Jul 2, 2009
    You fail to see the point. Forget about the specifics of giant amobea, or ghosts. It's about how real world humans would react when they are confronted with things like that. Are the character's motivations to do something believable? Etc...

    And again, just because there are examples how sometimes they didn't follow the advice, doesn't mean it's wrong advice.
     
  2. Admiral2

    Admiral2 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Langley
    The objection comes when you couch this particular bit of advice in terms of "This is what Gene would do" or "This is what Gene said to do" when in fact Gene can-x-ed his own advice on a regular basis, starting with the original pilot, and he didn't really give a damn if his writers ignored his advice either. His basic criteria for approving a story - whether he ever admitted it or not - was "Is the girl in it hot?" and "Will I get all the money and credit for producing it?" Every other comment of his on the subject is Hollywood Boilerplate.

    I didn't say the advice was wrong. What's horseshit is that Gene Roddenberry or any canon writers killed themselves trying to follow it.
     
  3. surak-toc

    surak-toc Commander Red Shirt

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    Apr 20, 2013
    That's the end of the topic, back to tips, what would you say is a good tip for creating a ship
     
  4. JarodRussell

    JarodRussell Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Less is more. Don't go into the fanboyish stuff of "it has 70 phaser banks and 500 torpedo tubes and a dozen warp nacelles". They did that even in Star Trek Nemesis, it was cringe worthy.

    Take a look at the TMP Enterprise and the TNG Enterprise. Those are thorough designs, for both interior and exterior.

    I'd also look at contemporary ship designs, like aircraft carriers, to get some idea on why things are designed this or that way in the real world.
     
  5. Admiral2

    Admiral2 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Make the design goal-oriented. Decide what you need the ship to do before you try to figure out what it looks like. Also, ignore the word "fanboy." It's shorthand for "I'm a more enlightened Trekkie than you." If your ship needs 70 phaser banks to accomplish the mission you set for the crew, put 'em in. Those who object don't have to read the story.
     
  6. Smokncatfood

    Smokncatfood Cadet Newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2014
    With regard to ship design, I like to read about existing ship classes (I.e. - Constitution class, Galaxy class, Miranda class, etc.). They can be modified, but I like being able to look up what the base ship looks like on Google, etc. thoughts?
     
  7. Bry_Sinclair

    Bry_Sinclair Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Unless you have your heart set on a certain class or type of ship, firstly devise interesting and engaging characters and think about what stories you want to tell about them, then select a ship to match.

    If they're explorers go for a Nebula-Class, soldiers go for an Akira-Class, scientists a Nova, workhorses a Miranda, etc. Also try to be practical. If a ship has 70 phaser arrays and 500 torpedo launchers then there aren't many hostiles they'll come across that will be a threat--unless they have 100 phasers and 800 torpedo tubes, in which case the UFP would be pretty screwed. They don't have to be on the best ship there is, when something a little more average will help ramp up the tension and make readers ask, 'how are they going to get out of this?'

    The class of ship will also have a lot to do with your Captain. NuTrek notwithstanding, it is doubtful a newly promoted 30 year old captain would get command of a Galaxy-Class ship. Ships of that size and complexity would go to older, more experienced and seasoned officers. Such an officer might get a Sabre-Class or possibly even a Miranda, until they gain more time in the big chair and prove themselves capable of greater responsibilities. Look at Picard, he made Captain at 28 and commanded the Stargazer for two decades before he was eventually given the E-D.