The merged and improved (?) KIC 8462852 thread

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Dryson, Oct 20, 2015.

  1. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I'm surprised astrologists or pastiche writers of HPL haven't glommed on to the concept of Earth passing through the focal lines of other stars between us and other systems beyond them that are so lensed.
     
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  2. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Even SF writers don't often use microlensing as a plot point. The only ones I can think of offhand are Stephen Baxter (Space) and David Brin (Existence).
     
  3. Dryson

    Dryson Captain Captain

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    http://earthsky.org/space/news-about-mystery-star-kic-8462852news-about-mystery-star-kic-8462852

    After looking at the image of the perceived Dyson Sphere I noticed that another light source was reflecting off of the surface of the sphere.

    If a Dyson Sphere was indeed present its enormous surface area would definitely create an unnatural reflection while creating a decrease in light.

    Perhaps the reason why there are several increases in light of KIC 8462852 is that light is reflecting off of the surface of the Dyson Sphere from another sun.

    There are two increases in light on either side of the 15% dip which does seem very unnatural to say the least. Unnatural because the light shouldn't increase if a planet is transiting across in front of KIC 8462852.
    Perhaps an object that is orbiting KIC 8462 has a metallic shell around it that caused the increase in light due to light from KIC 8462 reflecting on of its surface that the reason for the mirrored increase in light is that the area on the object orbiting KIC 8462, during the 15% dim, revolved on its axis creating the first increase then transited and the same area created the second increase in light as area came back into the same path that the first increase of light was created.
     
  4. PurpleBuddha

    PurpleBuddha Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Thanks for this! Reading up on it now as time allows. Very interesting.
     
  5. Dryson

    Dryson Captain Captain

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    [SIZE=6]Mysterious Star Pulses May Be Alien Signals, Study Claims[/SIZE]
    http://www.space.com/34541-alien-life-search-possible-seti-signals.html

    It would be interesting to compare the light curve data between KIC 8462, EPIC 916 and the other 234 stars to see if there is matching value or close to matching value between the two Mega-Structure stars and the unnatural pulsing stars.
     
  6. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    There isn't any correlation between the time series so no, it isn't interesting.
     
  7. Dryson

    Dryson Captain Captain

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    Another possibility could be that a planet that is similar to Europa but the size of the Earth could be orbiting KIC 8642. The icy world could be far enough away to not evaporate completely in its orbit but when it comes close enough to KIC 8462 sublimation could occur releasing plumes of icy material ejecta that might register as an increase in the light curve that is seen at day 445 and day 1172 or two events that flank either side of the 15% dim.

    There are 727 days between the two increases in the light curve of KIC 8462 which is slightly less than the amount of time that it takes the Earth to orbit our Sun in two years. The possible ice planet would have a zone of sublimation similar to that of Europa with the eruptions taking place at regular intervals of every two years.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2016
  8. Dryson

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    https://arxiv.org/abs/1609.05492

    Distance estimates from Gaia parallax and expected luminosities are compared for KIC 8462852. Gaia DR1 yields a parallax of 2.55±0.31mas, that is a distance of 391.4+53.6−42.0pc, or 391.4+122.1−75.2pc including systematic uncertainty. The distance estimate based on the absolute magnitude of an F3V star and measured reddening is ∼454±35pc. Both estimates agree within <1σ, which only excludes some of the most extreme theorized scenarios for KIC 8462852. Future Gaia data releases will determine the distance to within 1% and thus allow for the determination a precise absolute luminosity.
     
  9. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    You successfully copy and pasted the text of an abstract. I don't see how a refined distance estimate of approximately 1277 light years relates to your thesis.
     
  10. Dryson

    Dryson Captain Captain

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    Abstract

    KIC 8462852 is a superficially ordinary main sequence F star for which Kepler detected an unusual series of brief dimming events. We obtain accurate relative photometry of KIC 8462852 from the Kepler full frame images, finding that the brightness of KIC 8462852 monotonically decreased over the four years it was observed by Kepler. Over the first ~1000 days, KIC 8462852 faded approximately linearly at a rate of 0.341 +/- 0.041 percent per year, for a total decline of 0.9%. KIC 8462852 then dimmed much more rapidly in the next ~200 days, with its flux dropping by more than 2%. For the final ~200 days of Kepler photometry the magnitude remained approximately constant, although the data are also consistent with the decline rate measured for the first 2.7 yr. Of a sample of 193 nearby comparison stars and 355 stars with similar stellar parameters, 0.6% change brightness at a rate as fast as 0.341 +/- 0.041 percent per year, and none exhibit either the rapid decline by >2% or the cumulative fading by 3% of KIC 8462852. We examine whether the rapid decline could be caused by a cloud of transiting circumstellar material, finding while such a cloud could evade detection in sub-mm observations, the transit ingress and duration cannot be explained by a simple cloud model. Moreover, this model cannot account for the observed longer-term dimming. No known or proposed stellar phenomena can fully explain all aspects of the observed light curve.

    Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-08-latest-tabby-star-weirdness.html#jCp
     
  11. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yes, the paper is mentioned farther up the thread.

    I'll add a nutty speculation of my own:

    If megastructures were the cause of the short-term dimming events, perhaps they're being used to draw hydrogen off the star in order to increase the star's lifespan. The lifetime of a star of mass similar to the Sun and KIC 8462852 is approximately proportional to the star's mass raised to the power -2.5. Counter intuitively, the less massive a star, the longer is its life.

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Astro/startime.html

    Could the long-term dimming be a result of the reduction in the star's mass? The problem with this is that the timescale for energy to make its way from the core to the surface of such stars is typically of the order of a million years or so (the Kelvin-Helmholtz timescale) so any reduction of the star's mass shouldn't affect its luminosity significantly on time scales of a few tens of years or less.

    http://www.astro.princeton.edu/~gk/A403/timescales.pdf

    There's also the problem of what to do with all the hydrogen and helium gas being extracted -- perhaps store it as gas giants.
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2016
  12. Dryson

    Dryson Captain Captain

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  13. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Never hurts to look. I seem to remember a UFO believer who wanted to build a camera to photograph UFOs when people were away. He wrote programs so that it would ignore sats, planes etc.

    By accident, this person had built a sprite observing machine.

    So even research into dubious fields can be of use.

    Take TMP genius Trumbull: http://douglastrumbull.com/
    http://www.openminds.tv/doug-trumbull-special-effects-guru-ufo-hunter-december-8-2014/31251

    Not to convince him to take up storm chasing with that rig he's built. Maybe we can see ball lightning
     
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  14. Dryson

    Dryson Captain Captain

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    I have always wondered how black light can be used in astronomy. Does black light illuminate things that normally are not seen with the naked eye? Maybe putting the aura of KIC 8462 in the spectrum of black light responsive film development or digitally enhanced by professionals could show something different about KIC 8462.
     
  15. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Black light = ultraviolet light. Merely part of the spectrum. You do know how wavelengths of light work?
     
  16. Dryson

    Dryson Captain Captain

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    A new method of listening to noise from Tabby's Star and other solar events.


    A new way of testing data.
    I was reading this article about how an artist from Israel, Eyal Gever, is transforming laughter into 3D Printed objects.
    http://www.cnn.com/2016/12/22/arts/eyal-gever-laughter-sculpture-in-space/index.html

    The noise of space or a transmission can be recorded and then 3D Printed out on a ring. The ring would then be rolled in ink and then rolled across a piece of paper where each ink mark on the ring would be associated with a letter or number from the alphabet.

    The same process could used to record noise from Tabby's Star and then used to determine what different patterns are present in the algorithm that could be compared to other stars in the region to try and find the reason for the dims of KIC 8462.
     
  17. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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  18. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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  19. PurpleBuddha

    PurpleBuddha Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I have to admit, I watched those way longer than I should have.
     
  20. Asbo Zaprudder

    Asbo Zaprudder Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    A new suggestion is that KIC 8462852 is going through some sort of phase transition:

    http://www.techtimes.com/articles/1...star-eti-not-behind-dimming-of-kic-846852.htm

    The problem is that the time scales of the variations are very much shorter than the Kelvin-Helmholtz time scale of millions of years. One possibility is that this phenomenon is associated with the star turning off the main sequence when the hydrogen in its core has run out and it becomes a subgiant before it enters the red giant phase. To me, it doesn't seem tenable that instabilities in the hydrogen-burning shell would produce the dimming effect because of the time-scale problem but intuition isn't always correct. As no physical mechanism has been suggested, it really needs someone to use a supercomputer to model how a type 1.43 solar mass F-type star with the same metallicity as KIC 8462852 behaves after the turn-off.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subgiant
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2016