"The Demon's Apprentice"...the best book series you aren't reading

Discussion in 'Science Fiction & Fantasy' started by Ian Keldon, Nov 30, 2012.

  1. Ian Keldon

    Ian Keldon Fleet Captain

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    Like urban fantasy? You'll LOVE the series "The Demon's Apprentice" by Ben Reeder!

    Book 1: The Demon's Apprentice

    available in PB and Kindle

    Book 2: Page of Swords

    available on Kindle. paperback pending

    Don't let the age of the main character fool you. Benisn't writing YA, he's writing urban fantasy with a young protagonist. The importance is different.

    Chance (the series protagonist) is a uniquely well-written character with a strong voice and a charming combination of worldly wise snarkery and strikingly pure innocence. Part Harry Potter and part Harry Dresden with a dash of Glen Cook's Garret thrown in for seasoning.

    Anyone interested in a good read, esp if you like urban fantasy, ought to give these books a try.

    http://www.amazon.com/Ben-Reeder/e/B005FB6LNY/ref=ntt_athr_dp_pel_pop_1
     
  2. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    I stopped reading at "Chance Fortunato" in the quote above. ugh.
     
  3. Temis the Vorta

    Temis the Vorta Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I made it all the way to "alpha werewolf girlfriend." :D
     
  4. nightwind1

    nightwind1 Commodore Commodore

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    I lost it at "magickal".
     
  5. Hound of UIster

    Hound of UIster Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Sounds like self-published vanity cruft that they use to spam up wikipedia.
     
  6. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    I made it to "Maxilla Asini" which sounds cool as a Latin Vulgata citation, until you realize it means "an ass's jaw".
     
  7. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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  8. Icemizer

    Icemizer Commodore Commodore

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    That...that just sounds bad.
     
  9. Admiral2

    Admiral2 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Whenever TV Guide used to do articles with that headline "Best show you're not watching" my immediate response is always "If I ain't watchin' it, I obviously don't agree it's the best. There's a flaw in logic there somewhere..."

    In that vain, I got off the train at "Like urban fantasy..." I haven't liked urban fantasy since Beauty and the Beast with Linda Hamilton went off the air.
     
  10. Ian Keldon

    Ian Keldon Fleet Captain

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    Which is entirely appropriate in the context of the story, which you would know if you'd read the book.'

    Addressing several other posts:

    "Magick" (as in "magickal") is the proper Old English spelling of the word "magic", and is actually widely used in the pagan community today.

    If you guys are simply not into urban fantasy, that's fine, but I think it's way over the top to refer to it as "self published vanity cruft". Ben's publisher, Pendraig, is small press, but entirely legitimate.

    Maybe you should actually READ the books instead of talking like you "know" whether or not they're good. You just might find yourself pleasantly surprised.
     
  11. hyzmarca

    hyzmarca Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    No, it isn't. The proper Old English spelling of "magic" is "drýcræft" and the closest adjective to "magical" is "drylic."


    Magick is just pretentious.

    And no one speaks Old English, anyway, so even if it was a proper spelling it would still be absurdly pretentious.
     
  12. Ian Keldon

    Ian Keldon Fleet Captain

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    Excuse me, I should have said Early Modern English, not Old English.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magick

    and the term is in use today by pagans.
     
  13. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    It's still stuff from an ass's mouth.
     
  14. Mage

    Mage Commodore Commodore

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    It's lovely that my girlfriend studies at University. Especially since she studies English, in all its forms.
    The first use of a word close to modern english magic is from the Middle English Period, coming from the Middle French word 'magique'. In Middle English, the spelling varied from 'magik', 'magyk', 'magyque', 'malgyk', 'maugik', 'magike', 'magyke', 'magique', 'magict', 'Magika', 'magicke', 'magick' and 'magic' as we know it now.

    The usage of the word these days is only done by those who feel the need to differentiate themselves from something.
    It's not in the Ofxord English Dictionary, which should give a proper clue as to wether or not it's a legimate word, or just a phrase used by some people.
     
  15. Mage

    Mage Commodore Commodore

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    From the girlfriend: And as for 'drýcræft', it's actually a term for magic that doesn't lead to anything good. Here are some entries from several Old English texts, using the word drýcræft.

    1st entry: forˈbraid = To become corrupt, decay.

    Year: c888 Text: Ælfred tr. Boethius De Consol. Philos. xxxviii. §1
    Quotation: Þæt hio sceolde mid hire drycræft þa men forbredan.
    Rough translation: that he [..] with his magic that corrupted one.

    (So the magic in this quotation corrupts/decays an individual)

    2nd entry: roun-staff, noun. [compare Old High German rūnstab, Old Icelandic rúnastafr] = a runic letter or symbol

    Old English text: Ælfric Catholic Homilies: 2nd Ser. (Cambr. Gg.3.28) xxi. 204
    Quotation: Þa axode se ealdorman þone hæftling hwæðer he ðurh drycræft oððe þurh runstafum his bendas tobræce.
    Rough translation: the elder [...] by magic or by runes...[?]

    (Unfortunately cannot translate the last three words, but this quote connects the magic with the runes, confirming hyzmarca's story)

    3rd entry: morthdeed noun. = an evil deed; specifically. (a) a mortal sin; (b) a murder.

    Year: c1175 (Old English)
    text: Ælfric Martyrdom of St. Vincent in W. W. Skeat Ælfric's Lives of Saints (1900) II. 434
    quotation: Þa ðe wæron forscyldegode, oþþe þurh manslihte oððe þurh morþdæda, oððe þurh drycræft, oððe dyrne forliger.
    Rough translation: [...] or by manslaughter, or by murder, or by magic [...]

    (This piles together manslaughter, murder and magic, indicating that in this sense of the word, drycræft was pretty much frowned upon.)

    So I totally agree with hyzmarca. If you want to be fancy-pants. Go use drycræft instead. :P
     
  16. beamMe

    beamMe Commodore

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    I have to agree with you on this.

    The synopsis reads like shit though.
     
  17. FPAlpha

    FPAlpha Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Uh.. no.

    This sounds like some fantasy elements and some urban elements got thrown together in a blender, switched on and hopefully something good comes out.

    Judging from the blurbs that was not the case.. i think i'll pass (or read some Dresden Files instead).
     
  18. stj

    stj Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Maxilla Asini is still the only hint of any originality or sprightliness in these synopses. I expect it is a reference to one of Samson's encounters with the Philistines.

    These kinds of recaps are very bad for highlighting the fundamental unoriginality of fantasy, which in practice seems to be required. Way too much SF just borrows stuff from other SF stories but rearranging the pieces isn't the point it seems to be in fantasy. That's one reason why I find fantasy to be so hit or miss. Mostly miss, so I'll pass.
     
  19. BillJ

    BillJ Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Yup.

    The synopsis reads like someone's trying to ride the Harry Potter/Twilight gravy train.

    EDIT: Stopped at the "Chance Fortunato" bit the first time around, but went back and read the whole thing when Ian Keldon seemed to be implying no one was giving this a chance. My original post seemed contradictory so I thought I'd clarify. :lol:
     
  20. nightwind1

    nightwind1 Commodore Commodore

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    From the blurb, it sounds like bad White Wolf (Vampire:The Masquerade, etc.) fanfic.