The Cage (1985) VHS - What Closing Logo?

Discussion in 'Star Trek - Original Series' started by ClassicTVMan81, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. ClassicTVMan81

    ClassicTVMan81 Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    Does anyone know what the original separate closing logo was at the end of the grayscale print of "The Cage" on the 1985 Paramount Home Video VHS of Star Trek (TOS)?

    My brain thinks it was once this logo:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BcbXoBtYvNc
    (Paramount Television "Blue Mountain", used 1975 to 1987, music by Lalo Schifrin from 1975-76 and 1978-87; Jerry Goldsmith 1976-78)

    For the colored version of this same episode, first seen in 1988 after the 2-hour Star Trek retrospective, The Star Trek Saga, this was the original separate closing logo:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H_lrUXRIZrc
    (Paramount Television "CGI Mountain", used 1987 to 2002, music is an adaptation of the Paramount on Parade newsreel theme song composed by Elsie Janis and Jack King)

    ~Ben
     
  2. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Wow, I never knew who wrote those Paramount stings. How did you find that out?

    As I recall, the original home video release wasn't fully in black-and-white; it was intercut between color footage from "The Menagerie" and black-and-white footage from Roddenberry's surviving copy of "The Cage." If it came out in '85, it stands to reason it would've had the Schifrin sting and the blue logo.
     
  3. ClassicTVMan81

    ClassicTVMan81 Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    http://www.closinglogos.com/page/Paramount+Television
    (CLG Wiki's Paramount Television logo description page)

    Of course, we already know Schifrin was the genius behind the Mission: Impossible title theme music.

    ~Ben
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Anyway, I just checked my tape of the original video release (which was 1986, not '85), and it doesn't have any of those Paramount Television logos. Since it was an original video release that had never aired on television at that point, it bore the logo of Paramount Video instead. You can find the logo they used on the Paramount Home Entertainment page of the logo site:

    http://www.closinglogos.com/page/Paramount+Home+Entertainment

    It's under "3rd Logo (1982-88)," the "Growing Mountain" (it's the video clip on the left-hand side), with electronic music by Richard J. Krizman. It appears at the beginning of the video after the copyright warning; then we go to Roddenberry's 1986 introduction; then we get the episode (cut together from the B&W "Cage" and color "Menagerie"). The end credits of the episode conclude with a Desilu copyright notice but no separate logo card or music sting. Then we get Roddenberry's closing statements, and then the "Growing Mountain" logo again.
     
  5. ClassicTVMan81

    ClassicTVMan81 Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    Thank you.
     
  6. Peter Q Taggart

    Peter Q Taggart Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    Is the full color version of "The Cage" that was released later just colorized from the B&W footage? A friend of mine insisted this was the case and not the "full color version found in a vault" as it was advertised.
     
  7. Trekker51

    Trekker51 Cadet Newbie

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    I always thought so, because the parts that were originally B & W still have Malcahi Throne's voice as the Keeper alternating with the Keeper's female voice as it sounded on the Tv episode. The color was alos more muted in the footsge adapted from the B & W then switched to brighter when it returned to the TV footage.
     
  8. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    The color version is not colorized. It was reconstructed from color footage that was rediscovered sometime between the 1986 and 1988 releases. As TrekWeb explains it:

    http://www.trekweb.com/articles/200...story-of-Star-Trek-First-Pilot-The-Cage.shtml
     
  9. mb22

    mb22 Commander Red Shirt

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    According to http://startrekhistory.com/cagepage.html the unused portions from "The Menagerie" were found in 1987. The Star Trek History site is reliable and I see no reason to doubt it. The alternating Keeper voices were used since the found footage had no soundtarck.
     
  10. Peter Q Taggart

    Peter Q Taggart Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    Thank you Christopher and mb22! The Cage is still one of my favorite episodes.
     
  11. HGN2001

    HGN2001 Commander Red Shirt

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    THIS is the correct reason. The found footage was just visuals - without sound. So to reconstruct the soundtrack, they had to use what was available, namely Gene's old black & white workprint sections that had been cobbled together with the "Menagerie' footage in the earlier release.

    Harry
     
  12. mb22

    mb22 Commander Red Shirt

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    I wish that the "Menagerie" voice could have been slowed down for the CAGE reconstuction so that viewers could experience this production as closely as possible to the original version. Or just using portions of the black and white soundtrack, even if it is less than perfect.
    http://trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=90634
     
  13. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    ^Not slowed down, just remodulated to its original pitch. The technology they used to alter the pitch of Throne's voice for "The Menagerie" did not alter the speed of the playback.
     
  14. Captain Robert April

    Captain Robert April Vice Admiral Admiral

    I get the impression that it's not possible, or at least not particularly easy, to undo that pitch change, unless you're working from the original soundtrack. If you're working from the altered version, you might get close, but I'd be surprised if you were able to match Throne's original performance.

    The workprint, of course, still has the original voice, as well as parts of the "Next Week" promo (it's amazing the snippets one can find in those puppies),
     
  15. GSchnitzer

    GSchnitzer Co-Executive Producer Moderator

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    Well, it's probably possible; it's probably just not worth the effort.

    As I watch the remastered version of "The Cage," I can see where the film quality and sound quality take a sudden quality hit in those scenes that were replaced with Ron Furmanek's "recently" located negative footage. Although the accompanying sound was not found at that time and the sound from Roddenberry's work print had to be used, the voice of the Keeper is the high-pitched Keeper voice, not the original low-pitched Keeper voice. So evidently, they were able to do post-processing on the original sound and raise the pitch appropriately. I'd be surprised if they couldn't take it the other direction in this digital age and lower the pitch. But I can understand how it would be much simpler to raise the pitch of the few excised scenes than to lower the pitch of all the non-excised scenes.
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2011
  16. ahkyahnan

    ahkyahnan Captain Captain

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    If they can make Ashlee Simpson sound like she's singing in perfect pitch, I'm sure they can do something here. :)

    No seriously, I'm more familiar with the music industry than film, and I know there's a tremendous amount of digital 'fixing' you can do with old recordings. On a couple recent Thin Lizzy reissues from the 70's, they were able to re-tune the guitar parts on a few solos to put them into proper tune. They weren't out all that much originally, but while they were remastering & remixing the tracks they decided to 'fix' them. Even if you're not remixing and just remastering an existing 2 track master, you can work with individual frequencies to bring out instruments that were barely audible in the original releases, so I'm sure something like this would be possible unless there's something extremely unique about the technology used.

    Mark
     
  17. mb22

    mb22 Commander Red Shirt

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  18. BoredShipCapt'n

    BoredShipCapt'n Commodore Commodore

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