Talk of Bryan Singer's BSG project resurfaces

Discussion in 'Battlestar Galactica & Caprica' started by C.E. Evans, Oct 17, 2011.

  1. xortex

    xortex Commodore

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    You're right. How about inspiring and hopeful?
    The backstory of Dune is all about scientient robots as well but that was dark and gritty. I would like to see it be more like Verhoven's 'Starship Troopers.' :bolian:
     
  2. stonester1

    stonester1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Exactly, bravery and sticking to our better angels in the face of adversity.

    Though even in the original series you had the venal, petty, scandalous and evil amongst humanity as well. Because the exodus of the humans was about people piling into ships and fleeing the best they can.

    So you will end up with a hodgepodge. That has been reflected in different ways in both versions thus far, and I suspect we will get that in Singer's as well.
     
  3. Hartzilla2007

    Hartzilla2007 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    so basically go back to cheesefest.

    also is Adama suppost to leave the non best of humanity to die or something, i though he was suppost to be the GOOD guy here.
     
  4. Silvercrest

    Silvercrest Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Disco?
     
  5. xortex

    xortex Commodore

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    It was the eighties after all. Wasn't there one episode where Star Buck (Dirk Bennedict) goes into an alien disco?
    Or was that Buck Rogers? Mr. Roboto?
     
  6. stj

    stj Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Unfortunately "cheesefest" doesn't actually say much. Acknowledging within the fictional universe that the exodus regards itself as the elect is not intrinsically cheesy. Of course, most people are not atheists, so there really should be some question in their minds as to whether Adama leaving the wicked behind really is a sign of God's approval of him as a "good guy."

    For the record, "dastardly Injuns" is not a favorable comment on the original series. But this is a good point to remark that the Cylons are not really necessary to the premise. The further any remakes or reboots get from the vicious 9/11 hysteria infecting Moore's BSG, the better.
     
  7. 137th Gebirg

    137th Gebirg Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    With regard to execution of TOS, this would be a correct statement. With regard to original intent, it would not. The Cylons were known to originally be a warlike reptilian race who claimed fealty to Count Iblis, the "fallen angel" - hence, the voice of Iblis being imprinted in the Imperious Leader for over 1000 yahrens. They made a point of Baltar noticing that during "War of the Gods". The goal of the series was to portray a massive galactic and ethereal chess game being played between Iblis and the Beings of Light, using the Cylons and Colonials in the struggle as pawns - possibly indirectly assisting them in "ascension" to a higher level of being. For Cylons by Iblis through the use of highly advanced technology. For the humans by the Light Beings through spiritualism and self-awareness, as exemplified in-dialog to Apollo by one of the Seraphs, "As you now are, we once were; as we now are you may yet become". Unlike RDM's version, Larson & co. were never ashamed to attribute much of the goings-on in-series to "higher powers", beyond the self-serving ramblings of NuBaltar or the artificial Cylon piety in RDM's show. Don't get me wrong, I love NuBSG for what it was, but I will always prefer TOS' original concept. RDM's equivocation about "blaming it all on God" backfired on him in the finale, when that was the only thing he could fall back on when it was all said & done, instead of weaving it into the script much earlier - and more substantially - to make it more believable. I lost count of all the people on this board alone, screaming about how much of a cop-out it was. Anyways, back to TOS...

    In TOS, the Cylons were ALWAYS contingent to the greater plot-line. The show just started running out of money and couldn't support Cylon-heavy shows and they were relegated to background noise and kitschy mindless bad-guy action. Had TOS gotten the budget it deserved and a team of writers who could actually write, it would have turned into one hell of an epic show (arguably more so than RDM's version on many levels) and likely lasted several seasons.

    Like with Roddenberry, I don't put Larson on a pedestal when it comes to his creation. Like Roddenberry, he had a fantastic idea and was the only one who could have put it into motion - at the right place at the right time. However, there were more talented writers and producers that could have taken the baton and done far more with it once the track had been laid. And anyone who still thinks that TOS was a bad rip-off of Star Wars hasn't been paying attention.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2012
  8. xortex

    xortex Commodore

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    Larson also wrote that main theme, didn't he? which was the best part to me.
     
  9. DWF

    DWF Admiral Admiral

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    Well Donald Bellisario pretty much took over the second half of the season and the show was still cancelled. The original Galactica was just not meant to have been and hour long weekly series once the momentum of the first half of the season was lost thye just couldn't get it back.
     
  10. Ian Keldon

    Ian Keldon Fleet Captain

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    The difference being that In TOS it was clear that the venal, etc people were bad guys. Moore's version had them being "typical humans".

    Only if you consider having a more positive, hopeful view of humanity a "cheesefest". I'm sick of cynical, humanity-hating sci-fi. Give me Loorne Green as the wise patriarch with a vision over Olmos as the self-serving liar who got bailed out by fate anyday.
     
  11. Admiral Buzzkill

    Admiral Buzzkill Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    To be fair, a massive infusion of cash and really good writers can pretty much make a good show out of anything. It's like saying "throw strikes and don't give 'em anything good to hit." :lol:

    No, not "only if" - the premise as summarized there is cheesy, period.
     
  12. stonester1

    stonester1 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yes, the line of demarcation was less sharp, more nuanced...more "realistic", if you will. But it was still there. One only missed it if one refused to see it...or needs those white/black hats to keep the scorecard.
     
  13. Hartzilla2007

    Hartzilla2007 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah because the end of the majority of the human race is such a good thing to be positive about :rolleyes:
     
  14. Ian Keldon

    Ian Keldon Fleet Captain

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    Only to jaded, cynical people.
     
  15. Ian Keldon

    Ian Keldon Fleet Captain

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    The ability to persevere and overcome even extreme setbacks and hardship while maintaining your humanity and decency is a noble ideal that needs to be promoted and nurtured.

    Or is there no room for hopeful, positive thinking in science fiction any more?
     
  16. Ian Keldon

    Ian Keldon Fleet Captain

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    The "realism" movement is nothing but rhetorical cover for cynics and others who despise seeing man viewed through the lens of a higher nature and calling and who prefer to think of man as "just another animal".

    We have too much of that kind of thinking today.
     
  17. Wereghost

    Wereghost Part-time poltergeist Rear Admiral

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    I don't think that man being "just another animal" is in any way mutually exclusive with the existence of greater responsibility. We're social creatures; one of our great strengths as a species is that we can work together for our mutual benefit and also employ a theory of mind, ie see other people as people. The NuBSG humans, though, seemed to have an element of the genetic throwback about them. They had managed to forget much about their own origins, seemed to want to expedite their own demise and were quite ready to treat their non-biological descendants as being mere objects while presumably knowing otherwise. It seems to be a case of BSG-era humans having failed conspicuously to live up to their natural potential rather than them having failed to transcend their nature.
     
  18. 137th Gebirg

    137th Gebirg Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    It seems to me the cynicism we saw from the past decade, NuBSG included, came out of the stress and uncertainty in the post-9/11 era, followed by the biggest financial tank since the Great Depression. As we move into this new decade, society seems to be wanting to move away from that darkness and into more uplifting subject matter. The populous gets tired of such mass depression after a while, says "enough" and starts trying to look towards the future - realizing that both swings of the pendulum are necessary for healthy evolution of a civilization, so long as the pendulum doesn't swing too far, either in the direction of unrealistic and flowery naivete or dark and nihilistic self-destruction. The current attitude of society as a whole can be directly reflected in modern media. New shows like "Once Upon A Time" and "Terra Nova" (regardless of opinions on quality or longevity or whatnot) have started to take a more positive view of humanity - either by revisiting a simpler time of existence or "starting over" in a new world.

    Right now, I don't think NuBSG could sell as a series. The public consciousness isn't in the right state for that any more. TOS BSG, conceptually, may work better now that the pendulum is swinging more in that direction. I'm thinking B&C may exhibit more TOS-esque values, showing more traditional good-vs-evil archetypes, as opposed to ubiquitous moral relativism.

    Two of my favorite shows, Babylon 5 and Deep Space Nine, in my opinion, showed just the right mix of the darkness of humanity vs the greatness of the same (reflecting much of the mixed-transition attitude of the 90's which spawned them); the former overcoming the latter without being overly simplistic or contrived. B&C should take that path in order to succeed.

    Just my recommendation/prediction...
     
  19. Temis the Vorta

    Temis the Vorta Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    nuBSG could still sell as a series. A much more positive and "corny" spin on the same material could also sell as a series.

    Keep in mind that TV is all niche audience now - even American Idol is watched only by a small percentage of the overall population. If you're only talking about appealing to 2% of the population, you can target some very specialized tastes.

    Which is great, since the most interesting shows are the ones that almost everyone hates. :D
     
  20. Hartzilla2007

    Hartzilla2007 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, they persevered so well that got over it in 10 minutes.