Study Sees Continued Decline in Overall Credibility of News Media

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by marillion, Aug 23, 2012.

  1. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Admiral Admiral

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    While no doubt that's true in many cases, and it's easy to come to that conclusion based on their lameness on the air, I've also noted that there are some correspondents who spend a lot of time in hot spots. Extended first hand experience does count for something. These types of correspondents are a cut above the empty-headed anchors.

    ---

    Just as a general remark on topic, I try to take each report in the news as a puzzle piece. More news (from independent sources) means more pieces to the puzzle. I don't limit my exposure, except to stay the hell away from Fox.
     
  2. Locutus of Bored

    Locutus of Bored Co-Founder of ISIS Moderator

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    Al Jazeera English is quite good as well if you can get it (or you can watch it streaming online).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Jazeera_English#Availability
     
  3. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Admiral Admiral

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    That's an interesting theory, thanks for that.
     
  4. the G-man

    the G-man Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    New York Times public editor Arthur Brisbane’s reflections on how the Times covers the news in his final column:
    I also noted two years ago that I had taken up the public editor duties believing “there is no conspiracy” and that The Times’s output was too vast and complex to be dictated by any Wizard of Oz-like individual or cabal. I still believe that, but also see that the hive on Eighth Avenue is powerfully shaped by a culture of like minds — a phenomenon, I believe, that is more easily recognized from without than from within.
    When The Times covers a national presidential campaign, I have found that the lead editors and reporters are disciplined about enforcing fairness and balance, and usually succeed in doing so. Across the paper’s many departments, though, so many share a kind of political and cultural progressivism — for lack of a better term — that this worldview virtually bleeds through the fabric of The Times.
    As a result, developments like the Occupy movement and gay marriage seem almost to erupt in The Times, overloved and undermanaged, more like causes than news subjects.
     
  5. sidious618

    sidious618 Admiral Admiral

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    It's worth noting that the Times was willing to print that which actually helps its credibility in my book.
     
  6. the G-man

    the G-man Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Admitting a problem is good but fixing it would seem to be better.
     
  7. sidious618

    sidious618 Admiral Admiral

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    Not if the problem isn't there. I have some problems with the Times, it relies on anonymous sources a little too much for my taste, but the idea that it's this elitist liberal newspaper is laughable.
     
  8. the G-man

    the G-man Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    So you think it enhances their credibility to acknowledge a problem that doesn't exist? Ohhhhkayyy....
     
  9. sidious618

    sidious618 Admiral Admiral

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    It's called free speech. One of the editors has a problem with the newspaper and they allowed him to speak on the issue. The paper believes he's wrong but they're respectable enough to allow him to speak on it anyway. How is this at all hard to understand?
     
  10. C.E. Evans

    C.E. Evans Admiral Admiral

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    TV News is just a bunch of sensational soundbites, one right after another, but carefully arranged around the teasers before the commercial breaks.
     
  11. the G-man

    the G-man Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Actually, I understand perfectly. You're a liberal. Therefore, the Times seems "middle of the road" to you. You're basically doing the same thing as the staffers discussed in the article.
     
  12. J.T.B.

    J.T.B. Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    It is interesting, though if true I wouldn't say it's a positive development!

    Fixing what? The newsroom of a paper in a city that is two-thirds Democratic has a staff that skews left. That's news? What's not provided is evidence of reportorial misconduct or even bias. The biggest NYT "scandal" in recent memory was not critically questioning Bush administration claims in the run-up to the Iraq war, not really a liberal-progressive cause.

    "They" aren't acknowledging anything, it's an individual's personal view in an opinion column.

    Justin
     
  13. sidious618

    sidious618 Admiral Admiral

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    Bullshit, I'm afraid. I'm liberal but I'm perfectly capable of seeing what does and doesn't have a liberal bias. MSNBC is massively biased towards the liberal side, for example, so much so that I'd never watch it. The fact is that conservatives for years have decried anything that goes against their worldview. It's not that the NYT is liberal, it's that it says things which are inconvenient for the conservative viewpoint.
     
  14. Robert Maxwell

    Robert Maxwell Comfortably Numb Premium Member

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    At this point it seems to me that "liberal bias" is used to describe any point-of-view that isn't anti-gay, anti-women, anti-tax, pro-Christian, and pro-war.
     
  15. the G-man

    the G-man Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yes. Massively. But that doesn't mean the NYT isn't also biased, albeit much less so.

    While I fully admit this is not a scientific sample, I know far more conservatives who are willing to listen to or read center-left material than liberals who do so with center-right material.

    The problem is that, lately, you are getting a certain number of liberals or moderates, often in the media themselves also saying that they've let their biases get the better of them. There's the outgoing NYT editor, cited above.

    Here's the bottom line: you saying you're not biased or the NYT isn't because you're/it's not as bad as MSNBC would be like me saying I'm not biased because I'm better than Glenn Beck. That doesn't disprove bias. If anything it shows a bias.
     
  16. sidious618

    sidious618 Admiral Admiral

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    That's not what I said at all.
     
  17. Robert Maxwell

    Robert Maxwell Comfortably Numb Premium Member

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    All news media are biased, but some biases are more onerous than others. There are biases that push a particular sociopolitical agenda, and then there are biases that ignore facts and reality and instead produce fabricated nonsense.
     
  18. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Admiral Admiral

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    I'd like to see concrete evidence of bias in the form of specific examples, if someone's going to be throwing around the charge. Not a vague appeal to the fact that ya know the staff leans a certain way.
     
  19. Hound of UIster

    Hound of UIster Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Most news organizations are actually are more right leaning than left leaning.

    Interesting graph from the Atlantic.
     
  20. J.T.B.

    J.T.B. Rear Admiral Premium Member

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    Yeah, me too. It's just like NPR. Last year there was a gotcha video of an NPR exec expressing his personal left-of-center opinions, and a big cry went up on the right: "See, NPR has a liberal bias!" But nobody could point to examples of biased reportage. NPR's "On the Media" show did a story with self-identified conservative listeners who reported what they perceived as bias. And it basically came down to "Well, I can't put my finger on it, but I know it when I hear it." Transcript here: http://www.onthemedia.org/2011/mar/25/does-public-radio-have-a-liberal-bias-the-finale/transcript/

    So if it's all subjective -- as in the NYT public editor piece, where he had to use weasel words like "seems to" -- then how could that perception problem be remedied? Have a quota system where prospective reporters have to provide proof of political views? I don't see how something like that would work. It seems to me the most practical course is for readers who perceive a particular slant to either take that into account and adjust for it, or find another news source.

    Justin