STID "tracking" for $85-90 million opening [U.S. box office]

Discussion in 'Star Trek Movies XI+' started by RAMA, Apr 26, 2013.

  1. Belz...

    Belz... Commodore Commodore

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    Actually I think Blade started it, and X-Men kicked it off. Other movies have increased the genre's success later.
     
  2. Captain Robau

    Captain Robau Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    This. Exactly.

    I've been following this thread since the beginning and see everyone asking why it wasn't as successful domestically as we would liked to have seen. The above is the answer.

    I'm an engineer. I work with other engineers. We are all smart guys. 25% of us like Star Trek and have gone to see the film. The other 75% don't and haven't but have gone to see MoS and IM3.

    This franchise has BAGGAGE. And a lot of it. And stigma. And a lot of that. I'm scared to tell people I'm a fan due to fear of losing my Man Card. That's the way its is. Regardless of whether you like JJ Trek or not, he made two good movies. If these movies weren't damn good and critically acclaimed, do you really think the box office would have even been close to what has been achieved? Hell no because Star Trek doesn't sell well to mainstream audiences. An excellent movie that can be enjoyed by anyone does. That's what these guys have done and I applaud them for it.
     
  3. sonak

    sonak Vice Admiral Admiral

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    The original X-MEN only made about $150 million in domestic box office. And what was "Blade's" box office take?

    "Spider-Man" made $400 million, really ushering in the superhero blockbuster.
     
  4. Timelord Victorious

    Timelord Victorious Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    It is still running in my local theater in Germany. But is demoted to a 3pm death slot.
    I guess just the next week and then it's gone.
     
  5. Borgminister

    Borgminister Admiral Moderator

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    Round these parts 1 showing at 2 theaters, don't think it'll make July 4, but oh well... looking forward to the next one.

    And if work permits, I'll have a farewell viewing on Friday.
     
  6. Belz...

    Belz... Commodore Commodore

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    That wasn't Dream's original claim, though. And your response didn't mention blockbusters. You said "kicked it off", which I took to mean "was the first popular outing". Well X-Men was rather popular.
     
  7. Mr. Adventure

    Mr. Adventure Admiral Admiral

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    Blade was exciting when it came out and I think it demonstrated how to present comic book material onscreen and make it palatable and sucessful to a wide audience. I think it easily could have been the blueprint for the Marvel movie era.
     
  8. sonak

    sonak Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Well if that's the claim, it's still wrong. There had already been four Superman movies, and the fourth Batman film had come out a year before Blade. I don't think that "Blade," which didn't even do $100 million domestically, and was R-rated, really "kicked off" modern comic book movies.
     
  9. Out Of My Vulcan Mind

    Out Of My Vulcan Mind Vice Admiral Admiral

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    There have been three waves of comic book movies since 1978. Superman in 1978 kicked off the first (small) wave. Batman in 1989 kicked off the second (bigger) wave. That second wave was faltering in the late 1990s, especially with the failure of Batman & Robin in 1997.

    Blade, which was released in 1998, wasn't perceived by most moviegoers as a superhero film, but it played an important function behind the scenes, acording to Avi Arad, in that it strengthened Marvel's hand in getting studios more interested in their properties, which helped lead to X-Men in 2000, which is the film that I would say kicked off the third (much bigger) wave that continues to this day. Spider-Man in 2002 kicked things up to an even higher level, demonstrating that superhero films could be worldwide mega-blockbusters (the genre had tended to be much stronger domestically than internationally prior to that).
     
  10. Belz...

    Belz... Commodore Commodore

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    The Superman and Batman movies had become a joke in the early 80s and early 90s, respectively. The Superhero genre had failed to take off prior to Blade and X-Men. The fact of the matter is that those two movies paved the way to the modern Superhero genre. I'm fully aware that more successful ones came later, but that's not how I understand the claim made in this thread.
     
  11. Set Harth

    Set Harth Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I approve of this message.
     
  12. Out Of My Vulcan Mind

    Out Of My Vulcan Mind Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Tuesday number: $479,917 for $217,649,868 so far.
     
  13. sonak

    sonak Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Both "X-Men" and "Blade" made LESS than "batman returns" and "batman forever." Far from "becoming a joke," "Batman Returns" and "Batman Forever" were successfull blockbusters. Only "Batman and Robin" was a bomb, and that was '97.


    "Blade"--- $70 million 1998

    "X-Men"--- $150 million 2000


    "Batman Returns"--- $162 million 1992

    "Batman Forever"---- $184 million 1995


    I can maybe buy the argument that "X-Men" got the foot in the door, but I don't buy that it was "Blade." It wasn't a blockbuster, wasn't thought of as a superhero movie, and was R-rated.


    I still go with "Spider-Man" starting the modern wave.
     
  14. Out Of My Vulcan Mind

    Out Of My Vulcan Mind Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, people often lump the Schumacher films together these days, but Batman Forever was a big hit. If Schumacher had kept things at that level, rather than dialing it up to 11, he probably would have ended up making Batman films for some time to come.

    I'd say X-Men started it and Spider-Man super-charged it.
     
  15. sonak

    sonak Vice Admiral Admiral

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    agreed on the Schumacher thing


    and I can go with the "X-Men started it, Spider-Man super-charged it" argument.
     
  16. Flake

    Flake Commodore Commodore

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    I didnt realise Blade was a comic book character until about 10 years later :)

    I think Spiderman started the current wave that shows no sign of stopping this time. X-Men alone wouldn't have been enough imo.
     
  17. Dream

    Dream Admiral Admiral

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    I said Blade started the current superhero craze, not that it was the most popular. It was successful with using a superhero character, leading the other studios to take more chances with the genre.

    If you want to argue most popular superhero movie, that would be the Avengers, but that didn't start anything.
     
  18. Belz...

    Belz... Commodore Commodore

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    For the last time: I'm not talking about how much money they made.
     
  19. Out Of My Vulcan Mind

    Out Of My Vulcan Mind Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Most of the public saw Blade as a vampire action movie, not as a superhero movie. It opened some doors for Marvel behind the scenes, but it was X-Men and Spider-Man that made a big impact in terms of general audience and media perceptions of superhero movies and that led the studios to develop more movies in the genre.
     
  20. sonak

    sonak Vice Admiral Admiral

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    uh-huh. So what did you mean by "take off" or "become a joke?" How does one rate the success or failure of a big-budget comic book movie if not by box office?
     

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