Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Size

Discussion in 'Star Trek Movies: Kelvin Universe' started by Shilliam Watner, Dec 20, 2012.

  1. throwback

    throwback Captain Captain

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    Re: Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Siz

    I like the original design of the Enterprise. She is a beautiful ship. The new Enterprise is fugly.

    According to background sources, the number of crew aboard the new ship is 11,000. (Star Trek Film Dossier) To put this into perspective, the number of individuals killed at the Battle of Wolf 359 was nearly 11,000. ("The Drumhead")

    If other ships in this JJverse are equally large and heavily populated, then the ship crashing into the bay might have a crew of thousands.

    I don't understand the need for such a large number of crew aboard starships, or the need to make the ships as large as they seem to be.
     
  2. SalvorHardin

    SalvorHardin Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Re: Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Siz

    Where was that exactly?

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Kruezerman

    Kruezerman Commodore Commodore

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    Re: Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Siz


    "It also states the D and E decks – located in the saucer – are used as offices and quarters for a crew of 1100..."


    Also the ship was skidding along the water itself, so it could very much have hit land and then disembarked her troops. But it's irrelevant since we have no idea what is happening in San Fransisco at that time anyway.
     
  4. King Daniel Beyond

    King Daniel Beyond Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Siz

    Actually it's only 1100, from the old "Experience the Enterprise" interactive tour site.
    Because for this film they could afford larger sets, shuttles, effects and used an enourmous beer brewery as the engineering section. So they made the ships bigger to fit it all.

    The Next Generation Enterprise was meant to be much, much bigger than the one in the old movies - yet all the sets were all the same size as the old ones (because most were redressed Motion Picture sets) - what sense does that make?
     
  5. BillJ

    BillJ Fleet Admiral Admiral

    Re: Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Siz

    Why would they need to be bigger though? The whole idea behind Next Gen was that technology had advanced to a point where you didn't need as many people to actually run things.

    While the bridge itself wasn't bigger, the deck one footprint was when you added in the observation lounge and the ready room. Hallways wouldn't really need to be any wider either. The ship had forty-two decks and a thousand people, that's only twenty-five people per deck on average with a third of those sleeping at a given time.
     
  6. throwback

    throwback Captain Captain

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    Re: Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Siz

    I was using the figure given at Memory Alpha.

    According to Engineer LaForge, approximately 90% of the functions on a Galaxy-class starship, such as the Enterprise-D, were probably automated. ("Contagion") Though not seen in the TV series, the ship had droids. (There was a droid maintenance room on the ship. The droids were probably responsible for keeping the ship clean.)

    I hope that the time between movies has given the producers time to build a proper engineering section for the ship.
     
  7. Vektor

    Vektor Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Re: Starship Crashing Into Bay Scale Problem: The Saucer Is 1701-D Siz

    I'm thinking someone, perhaps Harrison, deliberately tries to crash the ship into San Francisco, but someone else, presumably Kirk and company, is able to crash it into the Bay instead. I've even wondered if the scenes in the trailer with people clinging to the sides of a vertical corridor (and at least one failing to cling) take place aboard the crashed ship as it is sinking.