STAR TREK the enemy of LOST IN SPACE?

Discussion in 'Star Trek - Original Series' started by ZapBrannigan, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. Ssosmcin

    Ssosmcin Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Knowing Irwin Allen, he never would have gotten to "but not prohibitively so" before hanging up the phone. :)

    That's just it, though, in a forced prospective shot, there isn't any optical printer work required. Right? Unless I am misunderstanding the process, which is always possible, the actors stand at different distances from the camera, the sets are matched, and then shoot, cut, print. Wouldn't that be easier and faster than shooting the scene more than once and then sending it to the lab? Especially for an episode that was already heavy on new effects. The majority of the physical effects on Voyage were done in camera and pretty simply.

    This is why I'd love a really good behind the scenes book on the series. I love going over this stuff.
     
  2. plynch

    plynch Commodore Commodore

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    Cristopher: "As I've said, part of what motivated Roddenberry to develop ST in the first place was that there had never been a non-anthology SF television series that was written with adult rather than family audiences in mind. LiS was originally more serious than it became, true, but it was still intended for family viewing, meaning for parents and children alike"

    And yet so many of us fell in love with Star Trek as children! Including my own kids (viewing it with me - awwww).
     
  3. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    I wasn't trying to evaluate whether Mr. Allen himself would be willing to do it. I was just mentioning that a technique for doing so existed, because I thought it would be an interesting sidebar to the conversation.
     
  4. davejames

    davejames Vice Admiral Admiral

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    All this LIS talk was making me kind of nostalgic so I decided to rewatch the first couple episodes for the first time in awhile, and... yikes. I realize it was made for kids, but I still somehow remembered those early episodes being a lot better than they are (and a lot better than what came after).

    But pretty much from the get-go the series was silly and ridiculous as hell, with lots of over-acting (or just plain bad acting), simplistic characters, and completely random and unscientific jargon that makes no sense whatsoever. I especially love John's hilariously inept attempt at a spacewalk at the end of the first episode. I mean, seriously, did this family not receive any training before heading out on this mission?? :D

    I will admit the sets look a lot cooler than I remembered (especially in b&w), and of course the Robot is as awesome as ever. But otherwise I just don't think the show holds up all that well at all. Even if some of the situations might be fun, the execution leaves a lot to be desired.
     
  5. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    ^It was a product of its time. For a mid-'60s show aimed at younger audiences, it wasn't bad at the beginning. The set designs and effects were impressive, and the music is what really makes it come alive.
     
  6. davejames

    davejames Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Some of the orchestral music is good, but there's a little too much of the standard "weird and eerie 50s scifi music" that Roddenberry was so dead-set against having on TOS.

    I do love the heck out of the theme song though, especially the later version that started with a countdown.
     
  7. Galileo7

    Galileo7 Commodore Commodore

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    Agree. Irwin Allen's Jupiter 2 sets both upper deck and lower deck were extremely detailed, very impressive production design.
     
  8. ZapBrannigan

    ZapBrannigan Commodore Commodore

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    Yep. I love the interior of the Jupiter 2, especially the lower deck for some reason, and I love the sleek exterior that can't possibly accomodate them. You have to make the Jupiter 2 about 98 feet in diameter to cram all that stuff in there, and when you do, the front windshield gets way too large and too far out from the pilots' seats.


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  9. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Nothing intrinsically wrong with that. Roddenberry was trying to do something new and distinct from what had come before; Allen was just trying to do another of his adventure shows.

    Besides, a lot of that "eerie '50s scifi music" was tracked from Bernard Herrmann's score to The Day the Earth Stood Still, and that's one of the great SF film scores of all time.
     
  10. davejames

    davejames Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Ha, yeah I don't know how they hell they were supposed to have fit the Chariot in there. Even if was assembled outside the ship, the parts alone would have still taken up a ton of space.
     
  11. Maurice

    Maurice Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Good thing Star Trek never had that problem...oh, wait...
     
  12. davejames

    davejames Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Oh wow, I just watched the Space Creature episode, and apparently there's supposed to be a giant freakin Power Core Room in there as well??

    And I forgot about the Space Pod as well. Clearly that ship was supposed to be a whole lot bigger than the model made it look.
     
  13. davejames

    davejames Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I thought they generally did a good job keeping things in check. At least until the Abrams movies.

    But then those movies threw all KINDS of logic out the window, so I don't know if you can really count those. Lol
     
  14. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    I call your attention to the forced-perspective corridor extending impossibly far forward from engineering in TMP; the 100-story-plus turboshaft in ST V; and the bottomless pit extending below a catwalk on the lowermost deck of the Enterprise-E in Nemesis.
     
  15. davejames

    davejames Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah the turboshaft scene was pretty ridiculous, but the others were just quick, offhand moments that I don't think stood out nearly as much.

    At least not as much as the Power Core room in LIS, or the hugely immense Engineering Room and Shuttlebay in the Abrams movies.
     
  16. Maurice

    Maurice Vice Admiral Admiral

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    How about the shuttlecraft interior that clearly doesn't fit into the exterior?
     
  17. Duncan MacLeod

    Duncan MacLeod Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    That's pretty minor, don't you think?

    And in any case that was mainly done to make it easier to shoot on that set.

    The J-2 interior/exterior was off by a good 40 to 50%. The shuttlecraft 10 to 20% at most.

    Of course at the time the J-2 model was made the ship was supposed to have only a single level. After that was changed, Irwin Allen wasn't willing to spend the money on a new model. Or a new full sized mock-up that would have been needed to go with it.
     
  18. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    The thing that's really out of proportion is how much more some people object to issues in the Abrams movies versus entirely equivalent concerns with the earlier movies or shows. But then, a decade ago, people were applying the exact same double standard to ENT's problems vis-a-vis earlier shows' equivalent problems. And a quarter-century ago they were nitpicking TNG to death the same way. It's not that the newest thing has bigger flaws, it's just that we haven't had as much time to get used to their flaws and gloss them over/rationalize them in our minds.
     
  19. Maurice

    Maurice Vice Admiral Admiral

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    My point is that it happens in just about every TV show. Arguably, the hangar deck we see in Trek doesn't fit into the ship, either, and neither do a lot of the movie sets fit into the Enterprise hull.
     
  20. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Clean Old Mod Moderator

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    It's a lot more obvious when you see the actors getting in and out of the Jupiter 2 mockup. The exact scale of the Enterprise and its shuttlebay isn't something you're going to notice until you start drawing up your own deck plans.