ST:TOS - General Fanfic

Discussion in 'Fan Fiction' started by SLWatson, Oct 27, 2008.

  1. Nerys Ghemor

    Nerys Ghemor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Very nice life-lesson feel here...this is one of those moments that while it may seem small, is one I think Spock would flash back to a lot in "bigger" circumstances later on. :)
     
  2. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    I always figured that there would be a good reason for Spock to be so loyal to Pike as to risk his career and even his life to take him to Talos IV. Plus, I adore the potential for Pike-era pieces, and don't think he gets nearly enough attention.

    Thanks much for the note!
     
  3. Gibraltar

    Gibraltar Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    A very professional, very mentoring relationship between Pike and Spock. It’s rather ironic that Spock’s best friend and commanding officer later in his career would be such an impulsive firebrand. Perhaps it was Pike’s patient instruction that gave Spock the perspective to accept Kirk for who and what he was. :)

    Oh, and so that’s what a calm, fully functioning starship is supposed to run like. I’d wondered... :lol:
     
  4. TheLoneRedshirt

    TheLoneRedshirt Commodore Commodore

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    Very nice vignette with a younger Spock serving with Captain Pike. It's a shame there aren't more stories from this era.
     
  5. TheLoneRedshirt

    TheLoneRedshirt Commodore Commodore

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    Yeah, but it's quiet.

    Too quiet. :shifty:
     
  6. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    LMAO! I think it really was Pike's mentoring in a more distant, professional (but still sincere) way that DID allow Spock to serve later on. It gave him a chance to kind of find his feet and learn his job, and get more internally secure so that when Jim came along, he was better able to handle the inevitable ups-and-downs two friends so different would face.

    And yeah, I get the notion that Pike's Enterprise ran on a lot more formality and military precision than Kirk's did. Which is no bad thing.

    Thank you very much for the comment!

    I've written a few more, but they're for one of my storylines and I'm not sure I'll post that far in it, just because there's so many blank spaces yet where big stories and adventures go. But if I don't, I will post a link so potential Pike-era fans can read 'em.

    :vulcan:

    Thanks for the comment, and the subsequent laugh!
     
  7. DavidFalkayn

    DavidFalkayn Commodore Commodore

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    Good story. I'm also a sucker for Pike-era TOS stories--they're few and far between and this is an era of Trek that is too often overlooked. I liked the relationship between Spock and Pike as well--we get a glimpse here at how Spock evolved as both a scientist and an officer and how he begins to better reconcile the two halves of his heritage.

    Very well done.
     
  8. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    They are! I've scoured the web for them, and only came up with a handful of them to read. I'm really glad Fontana wrote 'Vulcan's Glory', just to give us an awesome view -- don't think the newer one cut it.

    Much appreciated the feedback!
     
  9. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    Title: 'Cross the River
    Rating: G
    Timeline: 2265
    Words: 423
    Disclaimer: Star Trek belongs to Gene Roddenberry. I dare you to tell me otherwise.
    Notes: Written as a gift for my best friend Maguena; my first Spock-centric story. The title doesn't have much to do with the story, perse... but it fits in my mind, and that is good enough. Originally posted on the LJ Community fic_simplicty.

    --

    He did not know why the memory came, unbidden, but he welcomed it anyway.

    Truthfully, he could likely trace back through the thought processes that led to it, but as he picked up his freshly laundered uniforms from the ship's laundry on Deck 8, he just focused on the memory itself. Later, perhaps, he could go back and follow the paths that led to it.

    She was kneeling in the kitchen, humming, in a beam of screened sunlight from the window. In her hands was a delicate and ancient piece of fabric, which she carefully washed in an old bucket. The soap suds sloshed over the sides, but she didn't seem bothered by the fact that she would later have to mop it up.

    He had wondered then why she simply didn't take more care to not slosh soapy water over the sides of the bucket, in order to save herself the later effort of mopping it up again.

    The suds were iridescent in even the screened light, and the tune she was humming was human in origin, though he didn't know the name or the composer. He had been checking through the code of a program he had been working on, line by line, but every once in a while he paused to watch his mother washing delicate and ancient materials by hand.

    He had never asked her why.

    They had a perfectly functional sonic-laundry unit. She used it on nearly all of the clothing in the house; it was perfectly safe for the fabrics, and would never fade the colors. Nonetheless, once every so often, she would take certain pieces that he later understood were heirlooms, and wash them by hand in a bucket of water.

    It had been many years later, when he had more contact with humanity, that he had come across a painting on a trip to a museum. He had thought, perhaps, that he would understand humanity better if he looked more closely at their culture.

    The painting was of a woman, kneeling in sunlight, washing clothes. Her hair was pinned under a bonnet; her apron was damp. And even as he went through the details; the brush strokes, the artistry, the use of color and light and contrast, he could imagine for only a moment that he could hear his mother humming.

    Many years later, he walked into the quarters which were as arid and red as the world he had once called home, and put his uniforms away. And he remembered.

    Spock had never asked her why.

    Perhaps now, however, in some way he understood.
     
  10. Nerys Ghemor

    Nerys Ghemor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    What a wonderful image...the story itself feels more like a painting than a narrative.

    Just curious--did you have a particular painting in mind when you wrote this?
     
  11. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    You know, you're the second person to ask me. And I can see it in my head, but I'm not sure if it's a real painting... if that makes sense. Y'know? I can picture it right to the brushstrokes, but I'm not sure if it's something I saw once, or just a mish-mash of similar works.

    Thanks for the comment! I was worried to bits about this story, because it was my first attempt at writing Spock; I never quite feel confident when I do.
     
  12. Mistral

    Mistral Vice Admiral Admiral

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  13. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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  14. DavidFalkayn

    DavidFalkayn Commodore Commodore

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    A very moving and well done piece of scenery painting--something that is, unfortunately, becoming somewhat of a lost art in this day of MTV and fast pace. There's something enjoyable about taking the time to truly visualize the picture and scene a writer paints with words.
     
  15. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    Thank you! I could picture it pretty well in my head from start to finish, and was very glad to be able to put it down into words.
     
  16. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    Title: Decimal
    Rating: G
    Pairing: None
    Timeline: 2266ish
    Words: 712
    Disclaimer: They're all Paramount's property, not mine.
    Notes: Cheer-up fic for my friend InfiniteViking! Tax season is still strong in the 23rd century.

    --

    The computer lab was very quiet when Spock walked in. Deep into the ship's night, the graveyard shift tended to be essential personnel only, and those often most suited to working those hours consistently. There were a surprising number of non-humans on the midnight watches; Spock had found, much to his interest, that even after years in deep space in some cases, humans were still rather strict in adhering to the diurnal cycles of planet Earth. He had no such requirements himself -- in fact, he preferred to do a good amount of his focused research at night, when he would not be disturbed from his concentration.

    The computer lab was not empty this evening, however. Spock stopped immediately inside of the door, taking measure of his captain.

    Captain Kirk was sitting at one of the terminals, a large carafe of coffee next to him, as well as a mug in his hand. He looked disheveled; his hair was a mess, and there were dark circles under his eyes. The sight of his friend in this state disturbed Spock somewhat, but he leapt to no conclusions. After a moment, he stepped over. "Captain. Is something troubling you?"

    Kirk looked up with tired eyes, and then smiled in a manner Spock had long since identified as mildly self-deprecating. "Nothing of universal importance, Spock. I'm just having a hard time trying to file my taxes."

    Spock looked at the screen for a moment. While credits had replaced money as the primary currency, taxes were still a fundamental part of funding the Federation. In as such, those who earned above a certain amount were required to file an income tax return once a year. If he recalled correctly, the final date it had to be transmitted by was... in less than two hours. His, of course, had been done the same hour that filing had opened, several months before.

    "According to this, I owe more than I actually make in an entire year!"

    "Did you use the input forms?" Spock asked; while he preferred to work out the mathematics of his taxes on his own, the Interstellar Revenue Service provided calculators and forms to help those less inclined to take that route.

    Kirk nodded, rubbing his eyes tiredly. "Somehow, it still comes up like this."

    There was a long moment while Spock considered the wisdom of the next decision he had to make. But finally, he spoke again: "I would be willing to go over your input values."

    Kirk nodded again, obviously trying to muster some level of enthusiasm, though he merely looked more tired and defeated. He got up, taking his coffee mug and leaving the pile of data disks containing his taxes. Spock sat down at the terminal, about to go through the disks and find where the error was, but after one long look at the screen, he found the answer.

    He raised an eyebrow and moved the decimal point once space on the primary value of the captain's annual earnings statement, then hit 'execute'. "While I will check the rest of the variables, this now says that you will be due back one hundred and sixty four point five credits."

    There was silence. It went on so long that Spock was forced to look away from checking the rest of the captain's taxes to see why.

    Kirk was standing there, just staring at him. His eyes were oddly shiny. His hand trembled slightly as it clutched the coffee mug.

    "Captain?" Spock asked, concerned.

    That broke Kirk's stance. He carefully set the mug down on a table, then looked back at Spock, his stance strangely stiff and that liquid quality of his eyes growing more pronounced. He cleared his throat, but his voice still sounded rough. "Thank you, Spock. I... I believe it would be in my best interest, and in the interests of the Enterprise, if I retired."

    "I shall transmit your tax return as soon as I have finished verifying the data," Spock replied. After the door closed behind the captain, he was certain that he had heard a sound not unlike what a wounded animal would make in the corridor.

    But when he went to check, he found no one there.
     
  17. Nerys Ghemor

    Nerys Ghemor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Hmm...2266...that seems like it was still in the middle of the five-year mission. Was Kirk just showing the effects of staying up WAY too late, or was he really doubting himself that much?
     
  18. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    I think he was probably a little of both. Kirk's always an odd subject for me; I get really irritated when authors turn him into a gold-shirted messiah, who always has all the answers, when even in canon he was obviously flawed. They all were in some way or another, that's why they're so compellingly human. Then again, there's no denying that he was confident in a lot of arenas.

    So, I think part of it was a late night, and being tired, but also part of it was that this just wasn't Kirk's strong suit -- mathematics, and then the frustration of it not turning out exactly how he can guess it should (which... well, obviously, no one likes that but I think he REALLY doesn't like it), and then missing this really simple mistake with tired eyes after hours of trying to figure it out. I think anyone would probably get a bit messed up in the head.

    ::laughs:: Or, a much more simple answer: InfiniteViking was pulling her hair out over math, and I wanted to write a story to make her laugh, showing her that even the best have been occasionally stumped by it.
     
  19. Nerys Ghemor

    Nerys Ghemor Vice Admiral Admiral

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    "MAAAAAAAATH!"

    I've certainly been the one to make those kinds of errors. Very frustrating indeed!
     
  20. SLWatson

    SLWatson Captain Captain

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    Absolutely. Math gave me fits in high school, a lifetime ago -- the only subject I ever got a D on.