So What Are you Reading?: Generations

Discussion in 'Trek Literature' started by captcalhoun, Dec 22, 2011.

  1. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    I gotta admit, I am looking forward to the days where you don't have to worry about scratched disks anymore. I swear, people use library copies and rentals as chew toys . . . .

    But back on topic: all I've read recently are manuscripts for upcoming Tor titles, but I just ordered the The Star Trek Visual Encyclopedia, which is coming out later this year.

    Sounds like a very handy reference source!
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2012
  2. Markonian

    Markonian Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    So What Are you Watching?

    OffT: I own TOS-R on DVD and have begun to collect the ENT DVDs. I'm waiting with the other life-action-series because of the dated special effects and I've not yet tinkered with Blu Ray.

    OnT:
    Recently finished Immortal Coild and The Persistence on Memory.
    Still ongoing with Dracula and On Two Planets. 19th century authors had no sense of brevity. I promise I'm never going to read Dickens.
     
  3. Sho

    Sho Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    ^ I'm actually rather fond of Victorian literature myself, especially Elizabeth Gaskell (who was frequently edited by Dickens), e.g. Mary Barton. The prose is somehow rather relaxing ...
     
  4. Reanok

    Reanok Commodore Commodore

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    I'm reading Spock Messiah right now.I'm going to read Immortal coil next.I need to catch up on reading this book before my copy of Persistance of memory arrives in the mail in the next few weeks.I went to the used book store and found alot of older Original Startrek books and TNG books by Howard Weistein and other authors.Since there's been alot of dicusion about the older novels I wanted read them.
     
  5. S. Gomez

    S. Gomez Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    What you have to remember about Victorian literature, and Dickens in particular, is that most of those authors wrote their novels in serial form. They weren't read all in one go by the original audience. An imperfect analogy is a television series that tells an ongoing story. Collecting those novels into book form afterwards was something akin to selling the complete series of 24 on DVD after it's finished it's initial run on television. It's not that they had no sense of brevity; it's that they chose a certain format over another.

    Mind you, Dracula wasn't serialized. I don't blame you for suffering while reading it, though, because Stoker isn't the best writer. :) :p
     
  6. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    I think that's a very good analogy.
     
  7. WarsTrek1993

    WarsTrek1993 Captain Captain

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    Taking a quick break on my second read of Day Of The Vipers to read A Less Than Perfect Union (First time) and The Chimes At Midnight (Second).

    I'll leave my thoughts on both in a few hours, I imagine. ;)
     
  8. Kertrats47

    Kertrats47 Commodore Commodore

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    Just posted my review of David Mack's The Persistence of Memory.

    I just finished reading Hull Zero Three by Greg Bear, and I'm reading Enterprise: Last Full Measure by Michael A. Martin and Andy Mangels.
     
  9. JD

    JD Admiral Admiral

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    I forgot to post that I started STTN: Seize the Fire last week. I'm about 20 pages into it so far and it's been OK. My main complaint so far is the overly complex writing. I don't mind detailed writing and complex words, but there have been several times where Martin's just used unnecessarily complex writing that I had to read two or thee times before I could figure out what the hell the book was talking about.
     
  10. WarsTrek1993

    WarsTrek1993 Captain Captain

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    So how about that Less Than Perfect Union?

    An interesting take on what TOS would've been like had Terra Prime succeeded and Starfleet was a humans-only group. I liked the different personalities of everyone, especially Kirk. Sarek and the Romulan Commander on the same page was funny (what, with the author's comments on their similarities).

    Hoping to get The Persistence of Memory sooner or later...
     
  11. Daddy Todd

    Daddy Todd Captain Premium Member

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    October was a hellishly busy month. Hardly got anything read.

    10/02/2012 The Moral Landscape (audiobook) by Sam Harris
    10/09/2012 Titan (audiobook) by John Varley
    10/10/2012 Space: 1999: Omega by William Latham
    10/14/2012 Space: 1999: Alpha by William Latham
    10/17/2012 Who I Am by Pete Townshend
    10/18/2012 Wizard (audiobook) by John Varley
    10/20/2012 A Feast Unknown by Philip José Farmer
    10/22/2012 Giant Step (nv) by “Morgan Ives” (Marion Zimmer Bradley)
    10/27/2012 Demon (audiobook) by John Varley
    10/27/2012 Time’s Last Gift by Philip José Farmer

    Listened to John Varley's Gaean Trilogy, from the early '80's. I remember really liking this trilogy when I read it in my early 20's. I was less excited by it three decades later.

    Harris's The Moral Landscape was interesting, but seemed overly familiar because it covered so much of the territory already gone over by Dawkins and Shermer -- although in Shermer's case, I think Harris got there first.

    The Space: 1999 duology, Omega & Alpha, published a couple years ago, left me pretty flat. It moved through a predefined series of tasks, concluding most of the "mythology" laid down in the first year of the series (mythology largely ignored in the second season) and setting all the pieces up for the forthcoming "Year Three" novels. So, it served it's defined purposes, but did so with little style or panache.

    Pete Townshend's memoir was a great read, but I got the feeling Pete was massaging the storyline in places to Protect The Innocent (including himself -- his justification for how he ended up subscribing to a questionable website had the ring of a lawyer-mandated wording.) Picking another nit, Pete admits he cut the manuscript by about 50%, and there are a few artifacts of that cutting -- he makes reference back to incidents that didn't survive the cutting, leaving a few WTF moments. But all in all it was an enjoyable read, but for a fan like myself, much of the story was familiar.

    I obtained a copy of the 1975 reprint of the complete run of The Mattachine Review. One issue from 1961 was almost completely taken up by an extract from Marion Zimmer Bradley's novel-in-progress, The Catch Trap (which didn't see publication for 18 more years.) It was interesting to read an early draft, and compare it to the finished version ("Giant Step" is essentially Chapter 12 of The Catch Trap.) Although it was extensively rewritten, the characters and the storylines are all the same. It made me want to re-read The Catch Trap, even though I only read it last year.

    Read a couple of Philip José Farmer's short novels about a character who bears a striking resemblance to Tarzan. A Feast Unknown is a devious deconstruction of Tarzan and Doc Savage, in which the two characters, the immortal half-brothers (both sons of Jack the Ripper) battle each other -- and battle an affliction that prevents them from experiencing sexual arousal except during violent acts. As Spock might say, "Fascinating."

    Currently listening to unabridged readings of the Star Trek: Vulcan's Soul trilogy by (the late) Josepha Sherman and Susan Shwartz. I've read the first volume, Exodus, before -- but remember almost nothing from that reading. The second and third volumes will be new to me. Reading several Phil Farmer books in round-robin, and trying to get started back into reading some Star Trek novels. I'm way behind on the current 24th-century chronology, and I have more than a dozen titles to get through before reading the current Cold Equations trilogy by David Mack. Here's a list of the Trek novels I want to read over the next few months (the last three titles haven't been published yet):
    Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Never-Ending Sacrifice by Una McCormick
    Star Trek: Voyager: Unworthy by Kirsten Beyer
    Star Trek: Titan: Synthesis by James Swallow
    Star Trek: Voyager: Children of the Storm by Kirsten Beyer
    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Rough Beasts of Empire by David R. George III
    Star Trek: Voyager: The Eternal Tide by Kirsten Beyer
    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Zero Sum Game by David Mack
    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Seize the Fire by Michael A. Martin
    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Paths of Disharmony by Dayton Ward
    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Plagues of Night by David R. George III
    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Raise the Dawn by David R. George III
    Star Trek: Titan: Fallen Gods by Michael A. Martin
    Star Trek: Typhon Pact: Brinksmanship by Una McCormick
    Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cold Equations I: The Persistence of Memory by David Mack
    Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cold Equations II: Silent Weapons by David Mack
    Star Trek: The Next Generation: Cold Equations III: The Body Electric by David Mack
    Star Trek: The Next Generation: The Stuff of Dreams (na) by James Swallow
     
  12. Starbreaker

    Starbreaker Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Listened to half of Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter on audiobook today during a long drive. I'm going to finish it up over the next day or so and then delve into The Persistence of Memory, which I bought today.
     
  13. Kertrats47

    Kertrats47 Commodore Commodore

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    Just finished Enterprise: Last Full Measure.

    On to David Mitchell's Cloud Atlas!

    Also, just posted my review of Dayton Ward's Vanguard ebook coda, In Tempest's Wake.
     
  14. Patrick O'Brien

    Patrick O'Brien Captain Captain

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    Do you have a link Greg?
     
  15. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    Not sure how to post a link, but I found it listed at amazon.
     
  16. Patrick O'Brien

    Patrick O'Brien Captain Captain

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    ^Cool, thanks:bolian:
     
  17. S. Gomez

    S. Gomez Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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  18. BritishSeaPower

    BritishSeaPower Captain Captain

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    Just finished Warpath and now moving on to Fearful Symmetry. Really liked Warpath nice taut, action-thriller. However, I really wish Kira was a bit more active in the Post-UNITY books. While the Kira chapters were interesting, I was hoping for some Captain Kira stuff. Alas.

    Current Plan: Fearful, Soul Key, Rise Like Lions, "Reservoir Ferengi" and Never Ending Sacrifice. Then finally onto the Post-Nemesis books.
     
  19. WarsTrek1993

    WarsTrek1993 Captain Captain

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    Ahem, "The Chimes At Midnight"...

    In a word-wow, it was much better than I'd remembered. I enjoyed Thelin, he was a good, interesting character. (He was so close to Kirk, it makes you almost forget Spock isn't there).
    It was certainly a darker AU counterpart to the TOS movie series, what with the Whale Probe succesfully ransacking earth, David being tortured, the Klingons assaulting earth, and the Genesis torpedo eventually being used as the very thing the Federation dreaded (a weapon of mass destruction).

    Now I'd better go back to Day Of The Vipers.
     
  20. Kertrats47

    Kertrats47 Commodore Commodore

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    Just posted my review of the classic Diane Duane novel, Spock's World.

    Currently reading Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell and tackling Anathem by Neal Stephenson.