Should "Star Trek IV" have introduced a different NCC-1701-A?

Discussion in 'Star Trek Movies I-X' started by dswynne1, May 13, 2014.

  1. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

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    It goes beyond just some doors -- there's several lines of dialogue in the movie ("Half the doors won't open," "The ship's in pieces"), plus Scotty having just "fixed [that damn thing]" (the Red Alert notification-system), the turbolifts messing up, and the transporters being completely down, which pretty much point to a massive systemic failure of some form aboard the Enterprise.

    Michael Piller confirmed in at least one web chat that Data's line in that episode was indeed a direct reference to TFF ("Evolution" was the very first TNG episode to air after the theatrical release of Star Trek V, and it was a nod to that then-recent picture).

    Finally, the dialogue dating also confirms that it was TFF that Data was referring to, not TSFS -- "79 years ago" from 2366 is/was 2287, the year after TVH and the launch of Kirk's second Enterprise (Star Trek III having taken place in 2285).
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2014
  2. C.E. Evans

    C.E. Evans Admiral Admiral

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    Some of that could be just off-hand exaggeration by a few crewmembers to drive home their main point that the Enterprise-A isn't quite up to par yet.
     
  3. Nebusj

    Nebusj Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ``None of the systems are working! Well, except for the warp drive. And the impulse drive. And life support. And shields. And photon torpedoes. Shuttlecraft. The brig. All right, nearly all the systems are working, but darn it, the doors are glitchy! How can we get under way like that?"
     
  4. WarpFactorZ

    WarpFactorZ Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    A ship suffering a "catastrophic systems failure" would be completely non-functional -- not travelling through the great barrier unscathed to the center of the galaxy...

    The dates of the films were established/retconned by this quote, I though, not the other way around.
     
  5. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

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    "Catastrophic" was a misquotation on my part (typing from memory late at night) -- the exact quote from the TNG episode:

    (Apologies, there.)

    The dating actually derives from TNG production-office documents (the series bible, etc.) produced leading up to and following "Encounter at Farpoint," in which TNG was set 78 years following the events of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (at that point, the last piece of filmed Trek material), with Data providing the onscreen date of the first season as 2364 in "The Neutral Zone" (placing TVH in the year 2286).

    Two seasons later, in the third-season TNG premiere ("Evolution"), Michael Piller inserted the dialogue reference to Star Trek V in the episode, establishing the date of the film as taking place in 2287. This is the date used in the official chronology, as well. :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2014
  6. Mytran

    Mytran Commodore Commodore

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    A "systems wide technological failure" would still include things like warp drive though wouldn't it? Those things were still fine and frisky!
     
  7. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

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    In the episode, Data was referring to computerized control-systems governing a starship, which may or may not affect the warp drive directly. In both stories (The Final Frontier, "Evolution"), both Enterprises' warp drives appeared unaffected, from what I remember.
     
  8. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    The best part was the discussion of what folks thought what would be the Ent-A would look like.

    I was also pleased seeing the refit back in action, but like Mr. baker, it would have ben nice to see some freshening up.
     
  9. Maxillius

    Maxillius Commander Red Shirt

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    Actually, I look at that situation as similar to GM's J-body cars that debuted in 1982 and discontinued in 2004. The 1982 Chevy Cavalier, for instance, is like the original Enterprise. It was alright for the task it was designed for, and as time went on it was updated. The 1995 redesign is like the Enterprise refit: almost everything changed. However, toward the end the designers found that they couldn't fit all the gadgets people wanted in it so they had to stop making it, despite its popularity.

    So consider the Enterprise-A in that light. It's an old design even if it was brand new (which I doubt). It wouldn't be able to take the new gadgets Starfleet would have wanted to stick on/in it. So the Enterprise A is like a 2004 Cavalier: obsolete when it was new.