Ship that's travelled the furthest?

Discussion in 'General Trek Discussion' started by picardo, Jul 19, 2013.

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  1. picardo

    picardo Lieutenant Red Shirt

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    Which Starfleet ship has travelled the furthest? Picard's Enterprise to Triangulum and the Outer Rim? ...Or Voyager to the Delta quadrant?
     
  2. C.E. Evans

    C.E. Evans Admiral Admiral

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    It could very well be Kirk's Enterprise which was in service longer than either vessel or possibly even the Enterprise-B for all we know. Those ships could have travelled tens of thousands of light-years during their time.
     
  3. Captain Clark Terrell

    Captain Clark Terrell Commodore Commodore

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    I don't know how to answer this question because distance could be measured in time as well as space.

    --Sran
     
  4. Shawnster

    Shawnster Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Kirk's Enterprise traveled past the edge of the Milky Way 3 times. If you include TAS, it also went to the center of the galaxy.
     
  5. picardo

    picardo Lieutenant Red Shirt

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    I mean geographical distance with respect to planet Earth. Which one, at any given moment, has been the furthest away? Which one has really gone where no man has gone before?
     
  6. Captain Clark Terrell

    Captain Clark Terrell Commodore Commodore

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    I still don't know how I'd answer that because the normal rules regarding geographic distance don't apply in space. Voyager traveled to fluidic space and back. Multiple Starfleet officers traveled to entirely different dimensions. Any of these would fit the definition of "where no one has gone before."

    --Sran
     
  7. BillJ

    BillJ Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    In pure light years it would be Picard's Enterprise.
     
  8. Captain Clark Terrell

    Captain Clark Terrell Commodore Commodore

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    I'd have guessed that except that we don't know where V'Ger came from on its trip back.

    --Sran
     
  9. picardo

    picardo Lieutenant Red Shirt

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    Agreed, but in terms of kilometres, light years, etcetera, between Earth and another point in space, remember when it was mentioned that the Voyager would need 70 years to return home, while The Enterprise needed some 300 years to travel back from Triangulum (if I recall correctly)? Even though normal geographic rules don't apply, there are tangible indicators of one's position in space with regard to planet Earth?

    So I believe Picard's Enterprise was further away than Janeway's Voyager was, it's the impression I get
     
  10. Captain Clark Terrell

    Captain Clark Terrell Commodore Commodore

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    I agree with that, though I think V'Ger probably traveled farther than any other vessel. Christopher gives details about where he thought V'Ger went before returning to Earth in his novel Ex Machina.

    --Sran
     
  11. Third Nacelle

    Third Nacelle Captain Captain

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    Was it actually stated they traveled out past the rim of the galaxy? I always figured they left the Milky way traveling perpendicular to the galactic plane.


    I'd guess it was the Enterprise-D that traveled the farthest when it went to the edge of the universe... as far as it gets, unless we're counting trips to other dimensions/realms.

    At one point Q(uinn) took Voyager back to the Big Bang, so I suppose technically they were outside of the universe during that. But that's not so much traveling as Q instantly transporting them.
     
  12. R. Star

    R. Star Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ^
    Yeah, I'd have to go with the E-D traveling to the edge of the universe too.
     
  13. King Daniel Beyond

    King Daniel Beyond Admiral Admiral

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    Distance from Earth? The Enterprise-D in "Where No One's Gone Before".

    Most space-miles on the clock? That has to be Kirk's Enterprise in TOS and TAS, which goes from the galactic rim ("Where No Man Has Gone Before"), back there and halfway to Andromeda ("By Any Other Name") and then to the centre of the galaxy ("The Magicks of Megas Tu")

    You've just gotta keep in mind that Star Trek: Voyager slowed warp speed down a LOT for their series. What was a 75-year journey for them at warp 9.975 according to "Caretaker" would have taken Kirk's Enterprise a month at warp 8.4 according to "That Which Survives" (see Ep1 in my sig for the episode clips)

    Nope, that's a fudge introduced in the Star Trek Star Charts in 2002 to make TOS seem a little more plausible in the context of Voyager. According to "By Any Other Name"...

    KIRK: What happened to your ship?

    ROJAN: There is an energy barrier at the rim of your galaxy.

    KIRK: Yes, I know. We've been there.

    http://www.chakoteya.net/startrek/50.htm
     
  14. T'Girl

    T'Girl Vice Admiral Admiral

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    ^ Problem with that is, from the region of the Earth/Federation traveling toward the galaxy of Andromeda you're going to be traveling "downward" from the plane of our galaxy at a fairly steep angle. They would have left the plane of the galaxy long before reaching the plane's terminus .

    Why would the Enterprise travel along the plane of the galaxy, pass through the barrier, then turn downward towards Andromeda?

    While it does somewhat streach the meaning of the word, it does seem to make sense that "rim" is used to indicate the entire exterior of the galaxy. And the energy barrier completely formfittingly encloses the galaxy.

    So when the Enterprise visited the "edge of the galaxy" in WNMHGB, they likely were traveling straight "up" perpendicular to the galaxy plane.

    Earth being above the plane, traveling upward would be a shorter distance to the edge than traveling downwards.

    :)
     
  15. Andres

    Andres Ensign Newbie

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    i'd say its a tie Voyager and Enterprise, Voyager traveled 75,000 light years back home and the Enterprise traveled to the edge of the Galaxy or almost got there and made it to the Galactic Core in ST V:TFF
     
  16. BillJ

    BillJ Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Well...

     
  17. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

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    Well in terms of space it's the Ent-D. It travelled to another Galaxy some 2.7 million light years away which makes Voyagers trip of 70 000 look like a walk across the road.
     
  18. Bad Thoughts

    Bad Thoughts Commodore Commodore

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    I wonder if the OP took some perverse pleasure by framing the question as which ship went further, rather than which ship went farther. Enterprise-D traveled the greatest distance from Earth. However, temporal and extradimensional travel could be more extreme voyages, even if they lie adjacent to our space.

    ETA: A few trips through the Bajoran wormhole would easily eclipse the distance traveled by USS Voyager.
     
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  19. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

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    Lets do the maths on that, as Geordi said it would take over three hundred years to get home, logically that means less than 400 as the line wasn't almost 400 years it' must be closer to the 300 hundred mark.

    So we are talking in the region of 7000-9000 light years per year. Of course the Galaxy had a slower top speed than the Intrepid Class So Voyager's trip home could have taken around 10 years.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2013
  20. BillJ

    BillJ Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I just chalk it up to Star Trek writers not being very good at math. :lol:
     
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