Qo'NoS or Kronos????

Discussion in 'General Trek Discussion' started by Nine of Four, Oct 15, 2013.

  1. Tosk

    Tosk Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That's how I prefer to see it. Apparently STID also uses the Qo'noS spelling on a display readout. If a single film uses both spellings, that's good enough proof for me that both are fine.
     
  2. Bad Thoughts

    Bad Thoughts Commodore Commodore

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    It could also be that some sounds are in the process of disappearing from the language (or at least one of its major dialects). Non-rhotic English is about 200 years old, yet there are still many words that still have these devoiced /r/ sounds.
     
  3. CaptPapa

    CaptPapa Commander Red Shirt

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    I really do not know . . .
    It seems to me that what happens in STID doesn't matter, as far as canon goes. The events depicted take place in an alternate timeline, so by definition don't count . . .
    Or, is that just opening a big old can of worms? :confused:

    I'll just go with the good Dr. McCoy, "we don't hear the words of the Klingons". :guffaw:
     
  4. grendelsbayne

    grendelsbayne Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I don't really see how altering the timeline more than a century after first contact with the Klingons would be able to change the english language conventions for writing Klingon words. That ship most likely sailed long before Nero arrived.
     
  5. Tora Ziyal

    Tora Ziyal Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Any spelling will do. Except cannon. ;)
     
  6. King Daniel Beyond

    King Daniel Beyond Admiral Admiral

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    I can't see how Nero appearing in 2233 would change the way they spell Kronos/Qo'noS in 2259.

    (unless the USS Kelvin was full of important linguists:p)
     
  7. The Wormhole

    The Wormhole Admiral Admiral

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    It doesn't matter since TUC also used the Kronos spelling. Since it showed up in the Prime Universe, we have to count it.
     
  8. 137th Gebirg

    137th Gebirg Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    There have been different names for the Klingon homeworld over the years, the canonicity of some muddy at best. I recall something like Kaazh and Klinzhai as well (the latter also being one of the various dialects of Klingon language). Kling was definitely out there for a long time and TUC really made the canonical inroads with Qo'noS/Kronos. The native Klingon vs English-ized is an interesting take. I always thought that Qo'noS was the homeworld and Kronos (that is, Kronos One) being the K'T'inga class battlecruiser that brought Gorkon to Federation space. I assume that they're pretty much identical in meaning, though.
     
  9. Nine of Four

    Nine of Four Commander Red Shirt

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    Yeah, just like we have different spelling for foreign words in English, it would make sense to have different spellings for alien words.

    Now for an even more complicated question:

    Which version of the Klingons is "more canon"; the heavy-browed no-forehead-ridged Klingons or TOS, or the forehead-ridged Klingons of basically everything else???
     
  10. 137th Gebirg

    137th Gebirg Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    I don't think one is any more canon than the other. DS9 proved they're both canon and Enterprise explained the change, again, canonically. Whether or not people like the explanation is irrelevant, as it is still an official part of the mythos now.
     
  11. Sci

    Sci Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, they're just different ways of spelling the Klingonese word for their homeworld.

    Presumably, Qo'noS One was just named after their capital planet -- the equivalent of if the Federation ferried its president on a ship named Earth One, or if the Romulans ferried their praetor on Romulus One.
     
  12. Dale Sams

    Dale Sams Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Both.

    Just like it's Jack Donahee and Jack Donaghee.
     
  13. Melakon

    Melakon Admiral Admiral

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    It's like all the issues with James R. Kirk vs. James T. Kirk. Maybe Kirk's middle name was Reinhold or something, and he hated it so much he changed his middle name to Tiberius.
     
  14. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    I'm partial to the James Riberius hypothesis.
     
  15. Captain Kathryn

    Captain Kathryn Commodore Commodore

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    Eh....I tend to think as the movie or tv version as being Kronos, whereas the novels always have Qo'Nos.
     
  16. FormerLurker

    FormerLurker Commodore Commodore

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    No, that's Portuguese, where an 'R' at the beginning of a word is pronounced as an 'H'.
     
  17. Stoo

    Stoo Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    I'd go with Kronos, just to make a stand against random apostrophes in scifi and fantasy words.
     
  18. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    Do you mean you don't like the name of the planet V'ulc'an?
     
  19. loghaD

    loghaD Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    The native spelling is . However, Humans tend to have trouble writing pIqaD symbols, so they've come up with various romanization systems.

    The most widely accepted is that which is used by Marc Okrand, in which the planet's name is spelled Qo'noS (note that this spelling is case-sensitive; it's never spelling Qo'nos or Qo'NoS). It is perhaps etymologically connected to the word qo', which means "world". A common way of referring to the planet is juHqo', meaning "the homeworld".
    In The Klingon Dictionary, Okrand uses Kronos when writing in English and Qo'noS when writing in romanized Klingon.

    In klingonaase, the planet is called Klinzhai. This is not particularly strange: English-speakers call the Human homeworld Earth (or Terra). German-speakers call it die Erde, French-speakers call it la Terre and Swedish-speakers call it jorden (or, when they're feeling fancy, Tellus). Speakers of Mandarin, Japanese and Korean may all spell its name 地球, but the pronunciation varies from language to language.
    Those all mean the same thing in their respective languages, but there are also languages in which the names are completely different. For example, the Navajo name nahasdzáán means "our mother", the Ainu アィヌモシㇼ means "the land of the people", and the Scottish Gaelic cruinne-cè means something like "the globe of the world".

    Presumably, the Klingon homeworld would have had different names in different languages, and probably a number of variants variants in each language, too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2013
  20. David.Blue

    David.Blue Commander Red Shirt

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    :techman::techman::techman::techman::techman::techman::techman::techman::techman::techman::techman::techman:
    :bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian::bolian:
    :vulcan: