Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP arc

Discussion in 'Trek Literature' started by RonG, Jul 12, 2012.

  1. RonG

    RonG Captain Captain

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    Re: Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP a

    Cold Equations, IMO, was an arc centered on AI, using the ongoing TNG cast and the Typhon Pact as backdrop. In the "Typhon Pact arc" detailed (IMO) in ASD through Brinkmanship, the Pact is in the front (after using the post-Destiny landscape as a forerunner theme)

    Well, that's the first I've heard of this :mallory:, but having an ominous tiutle like The Fall would have been quite a callback to the back pages of ASD, when it was written that "2010 - the Typhon Pact will rise".. oh well :rolleyes:
     
  2. Paris

    Paris Commodore Commodore

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    Re: Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP a

    By chance, does DRG3 mention Nog's rank in either one of these books? I'm pretty sure he was a Lieutenant Commander in IFM. Just curious if this was carried over or not. We don't want another Taurik on our hands ;)
     
  3. Marcus Porcius Cato

    Marcus Porcius Cato Commander Red Shirt

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    Re: Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP a

    Maybe, but what is left at this point but a war to the Death between Federation and the Typhon Pact?
     
  4. Hartzilla2007

    Hartzilla2007 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP a

    What makes you think a war would be on the table at this point seeing as a decent chunk of the anti-federation Pact members have probably blown what influence they might have due to their grand schemes blowing up in their faces.
     
  5. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Re: Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP a

    Star Trek has very rarely been about "war to the death." Indeed, even in its most seemingly intractable military conflicts -- the Dominion War, the Xindi conflict, the Borg Invasion in the novels -- the ultimate resolution has usually turned out to be an act of peacemaking rather than destruction (although only half credit goes to the Xindi conflict, since they only made peace with the mammalian factions).

    If anything, what we're seeing in the books has never been a strict Pact-vs.-Federation dynamic -- it's been more of a competition among the Pact's own members, some hardline and some moderate. And rather than uniting to form a common front, those factions have only become more divided in recent books, with the Romulans and Gorn becoming friendlier to the Federation than they are toward their own fellow Pact members.
     
  6. Marcus Porcius Cato

    Marcus Porcius Cato Commander Red Shirt

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    Re: Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP a

    War to the death might have been exaggeration, but I think way the novels-verse has been shaping up, the state of the two powers have been locked in a cold war much like before the Dominion War, a open conflict, a warfare seems to be the next step.
     
  7. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Re: Plagues of Night and Raise the Dawn – conclusion of the first TP a

    ^I'll never understand readers who assume war is inevitable. In the history of Star Trek, both screen and prose, stories about open warfare have been very rare. Maybe they've gotten more common starting with DS9, but Star Trek is not, never has been, and hopefully never will be a franchise that's predominantly about war. If it were, it would've been called Star Wars, and then George Lucas would've had to think of some other name for his little movie.

    Also, keep in mind that the term "Cold War" comes from the real history of US-Soviet Union interactions in the mid-20th century. And that never blew up into open war; on the contrary, it was a decades-long standoff that ended with the collapse from within of one of the competing powers, followed by greatly improved, peaceful relations between the former mortal enemies. So to assume a cold war must inevitably escalate into hot war is to overlook actual history.

    The one thing the Pact has been consistently in conflict with has been itself. It's never been anything like a united front; it's been six nations with separate agendas jockeying with each other for advantage. And if anything, their internal conflicts have only been escalating. You talk about "the two powers," but there are at least two major factions within the Pact that are turning increasingly against each other.
     

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