Name your imponderables for Star Trek

Discussion in 'General Trek Discussion' started by Robbiesan, Jan 16, 2014.

  1. JD5000

    JD5000 Captain Captain

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    Nov 23, 2013
    Location:
    Jackson, WY
    1. Why do Starfleet vessels almost always enter a planet's orbit in its northern hemisphere?

    Because doing everyday stuff the same way every time makes the process more efficient.

    2. Why doesn't the lighting aboard a starship change to simulate day and evening conditions?

    Yeah, that would have been a good job for O'Brien.

    3. Why do non-human races have nearly identical appearances (haircuts, skin color, etc.)?

    Because style is universal. As "The Cat" said, "I've seen mirrors, I have eyes. Let's face it, buddy. I have a body that makes men wet. " And he meant it.

    4. Why do Starfleet officers not carry knives or other cutting weapons, given that Klingons, Romulans, and Andorians (pre-Federation) frequently employed their own?

    Phasers set to even stun have proven over and over again to dramatically overpower metallic martial weapons. Unless some a-hole makes a neutrino field or something and 'disrupts phaser activity'.

    5. Given the hazardous environments they're often forced to work in, why do Starfleet officers not use skin and eye protection? Are there no hats in the twenty third or fourth centuries?

    Guinan has them all.

    Awesome questions Sran, I hope you sleep well tonight!
     
  2. USS Triumphant

    USS Triumphant Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    How do you know that isn't sometimes their southern hemisphere and the planet just rotates and revolves retrograde? ;)
     
  3. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Admiral Admiral

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    "Who are you?"
    It does.
     
  4. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    May 12, 2004
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    Oxford, PA
    This is mentioned in "Conscience of the King" as well, although, admittedly, there's seldom evidence of it.