Most popular male names since 1960s

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by JoeZhang, Oct 24, 2013.

  1. JoeZhang

    JoeZhang Vice Admiral Admiral

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  2. Kirby

    Kirby Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    That's an interesting graphic, and somewhat hypnotic. I was born in 1968 and there were a lot of Michaels in my elementary school class, and I was one of four Davids. My son Ethan was born in 2002, and he is once of five Ethans in his elementary school class. We chose the name Ethan because in 2001 it was number 17 or so in the most popular name list, and then shot to number 2 in 2002. Strange how that works out.
     
  3. RoJoHen

    RoJoHen Awesome Premium Member

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    I've always wondered how people with "popular" names deal with that. I think it would annoying as hell having lots of people in your life with the same name as you.
     
  4. Naira

    Naira Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Interesting. I had seen the corresponding graphic for girls (link), which seems to offer greater variety throughout the years. However, there are many popular girl names that sound similar, like Jessica, Jenifer etc.
     
  5. bbjegglebells

    bbjegglebells Admiral Admiral

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    Neat. As a James, I haven't had a school classroom or a job without another James present (and they always took the name Jim first).
     
  6. Hau’oli Lanui

    Hau’oli Lanui See where the sky meets the sea, It calls me Premium Member

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    My brothers name is William Jacob, two of the most popular names. He wound up naming his son Jacob William, yeah so make of that what you will. I'm Thomas Edward, while Thomas was one of the more popular name, no idea where Edward came from. I could have been named Kelly Lee as my mom wanted to do before my father overruled her. Kelly was a good friend of my fathers, who was suppose to be my godfather until he was killed in a car crash.
     
  7. HobartFloyt

    HobartFloyt Captain Captain

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    Personal experience in having an uncommon name would suggest that having a common name is more comforting for kids, being "normal" and all that. I hated my first name up through my teen years, though have come to accept that it works well against my surname. Luckily my first name wasn't easily corruptible too
     
  8. Yoda

    Yoda Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Madison is a horrible name. Sorry, all you Madisons out there.
     
  9. RAMA

    RAMA Admiral Admiral

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    All religious names of course.
     
  10. scotpens

    scotpens Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Scott is a fairly common name, but I'm the only Scot I know who spells his name with one "T." (It wasn't my idea, but I kind of like it.)

    Probably a way of giving the son his father's name without the confusion that can result from being a Suchandsuch, Jr.

    Or a son can have his father's first name but a different middle name, like the Reagans or the Bushes. Or the son can use a different nickname, e.g. Eugene Wesley Roddenberry Jr. who goes by "Rod" Roddenberry.
     
  11. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    It is indeed interesting, especially how state trends overlap the national thread, but regional variations (North-West, New England, South) are significant.

    For very obvious reasons, last year I did some research on names (meaning, origin, popularity, etc), but of course it was for Italy, so the threads are very different.

    For the record, while the most common names for the whole population in Italy are still the old-fashionate Giuseppe and Giovanni for men, and Maria and Anna for women, the most common baby names in Italy in the last 10 years are Francesco and Alessandro for boys, and Giulia and Sofia for girls. Foreign names are a growing trend (especially English names, so it's not something specific to the immigrant population), but I'm a bit wary of them: sometimes they sound cool, but more often than not they are just awkward, and end up being horribly mangled by Italian speakers.

    When we were choosing the name of the kid, each of us had a few favourites (Alessandro, Luca, Michele, Marco, Davide, to say a few), but we were also looking for a name that was short, simple, common but not overwhelmingly popular. Dario was not on our mind at first, but it started to grow on us, and in the end we were very pleased with the selection. (It doesn't sound either too cute or too stuffy, it's easy to pronounce, has a nice meaning, and translates well in other languages.)
     
  12. Pondwater

    Pondwater Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Totally!

    Same here.
     
  13. Skywalker

    Skywalker Admiral Admiral

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    Really? Forty years of Michael? It's a fine name, but come on...
     
  14. Kestra

    Kestra Admiral Premium Member

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    As someone with an extremely uncommon name in the US, I disliked it for maybe a couple grades in elementary school, then grew to love it. I'd much rather have my name than a common one. That being said, I wouldn't want some random uncommon name. Mine is unusual here because it's Indian, but my parents are from India so it makes sense. If they had picked an unusual name from somewhere else or just done an unusual spelling of a common name, I might feel differently.

    And yes iguana, I like that your son's name is fairly easy to say even for non-Italians. I don't think that sort of thing is a requirement, but it's definitely a bonus when it's a name you already like.
     
  15. Stephen!

    Stephen! Captain Captain

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    Too many Jacobs .... reminds me of these :)

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Hau’oli Lanui

    Hau’oli Lanui See where the sky meets the sea, It calls me Premium Member

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    We were very deliberate in the names we chose for our kids. I wanted to use names that were short and couldn't be shorten or had other nicknames. We wanted the names to be different but not so unique that it would be weird.

    So we chose Ian Riley for my oldest. I wanted to name our oldest Ian Malcolm, yes after the scientist from Jurassic Park. My wife wanted to name him Riley Hunter, so we compromised with Ian Riley. We decided to used a R name as the middle name to honor her father Robert. Ian is ranked about 75th in the US.

    Our second son Aaron Liam was named after her Uncle who passed away a few days before he was born. This uncle was very important to my wife, helped her family though when her dad died when she was a child. I wanted to name him Jared Chase and she originally wanted Avery Tyler. We decided that we would also choose a middle name to begin with L to honor my father Leo. Aaron is currently ranked #65 in the US.

    Our third child, Kira Avery was super easy. We both chose the name Kira/Kiera from the start. However I wanted Kira Paige and my wife wanted Kiera Avery. To compromised we used the Kira spelling and we used the name Avery for her middle name. Kira is currently ranked #359 in the US.
     
  17. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    I agree, it's not required but it's really a plus, especially since I work in a very international environment, so I expect my son to be exposed to different languages from early on.

    I must confess, I never really understood this reasoning (and I've heard it often, so it must be something wrong with me, I suppose). As I mentioned, my name is pretty long, so it gets shorted often (and sometimes in different ways - in fact, I think my mother is the only one who consistently uses my full given name). I don't see the harm in it.

    Also, nicknames have often nothing to do with given names, so it's not like as a parent you can do anything about that. I am pretty sure my parents never expected anyone to call me "iguana" when I grew up. :lol:
     
  18. IndyJones

    IndyJones Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I find the Twilight of it all a little depressing.
     
  19. Tora Ziyal

    Tora Ziyal Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ^ Exactly. Great name, terrible connection.
     
  20. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Not a lot of Jeffs...There is a football player called Jeff Wright, a director and firefighter I think--and Jeffrey Wright the actor....So I have competition