Moldy Bread

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by Trekker4747, Feb 7, 2013.

  1. Fruitcake

    Fruitcake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    I've always got frozen bread. You don't need to nuke it before you toast it.
     
  2. gturner

    gturner Admiral

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    The safety depends on the type of mold. According to this, most are harmless, but a few are not.

    Older LiveStrong link on eating moldy bread.

    Since you're probably not sure which kind of mold you ate, I'd recommend a complete blood transfusion and starting a course of steroids, human growth hormone, testosterone, EPO, cortisone, and possibly xenoandrogens and deer antler extract, masked of course by saline injections.

    You might also want to buy a really nice bicycle and get on a racing team.
     
  3. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    The Lance Armstrong Special?
     
  4. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    Actually, refrigerating bread does the exact opposite.
     
  5. Scroogourner

    Scroogourner Admiral Admiral

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    ^Not in the high humidity of florida.
     
  6. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^I guess it depends on your goal. Refrigerating bread will make it go stale.
     
  7. CorporalClegg

    CorporalClegg Admiral Admiral

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    tsq is right. There's a reason it's not breadbox.
     
  8. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    Well, it's been a few hours and I think I can say I'm in the clear. No bathroom issues, no hallucinations from ergot poisoning. So, yep, I think from now on I'll fee safe eating the "not visibly moldy" slices of bread. Go Iron Kids!
     
  9. Avon

    Avon Commodore Commodore

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    or you could just but some fresh stuff tomorrow and stop worrying
     
  10. Fruitcake

    Fruitcake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    If you live in the tropics stale is better than filled with mould in 5 minutes. Keep it in the fridge for eating over two days, in the freezer for longer storage.
     
  11. scotpens

    scotpens Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Molds are fungi, not bacteria.

    When you throw away bread that has a bit of mold on it, you dine with HITLER! :)
     
  12. Roger Wilco

    Roger Wilco Admiral Admiral

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    Freezing bread works very well in my experience, keeping it in the fridge doesn't, but of course I don't live in a climate where that's necessary. And I eat almost only dark bread, maybe it's different for American sandwich bread.

    The bread I buy and because of the way I keep it, if I don't use it in time, it gets inedibly hard long before it gets moldy.
     
  13. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    yes, same here. It used to get hard before I could eat it up, so now I always buy a big loaf, cut itup and freeze it. This way I can always have as much bread as I just need, without the rest getting hard.
    Btw, you can use the hard bread for puddings and souflees or for thickening a sauce or gravy. There's also a recipe for rye bread soup :) Or you soak it for a while and feed the ducks with it.

    In Germany, consumer protection and MDs urgently recommend that you don't eat bread that has gone moldy but throw away the whole loaf. They say that what you see is only a fraction of the fungus while the rest of it may well have spread though the whole bread already and might cause great damage to your liver and kidneys. Sliced bread is more likely to get moldy because of the larger surface. White bread (toast for example) is moister than dark bread (rye) and therefore more likely to develop mold.
     
  14. Alidar Jarok

    Alidar Jarok Everything in moderation but moderation Moderator

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    Well, you have to pick your poison. It'll prevent mold (in my experience), but, yes, it'll make it go stale quicker. Freezing it is similar in that regard. But you can toast stale bread, which helps.
     
  15. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ^sour dough rye bread freezes rather well. It gets only a tiny bit stale (about as if it were 1-2 days old). I buy it in 6 lbs loaves and freeze it in quarters (not sliced). This way it stays fresher. You can defrost it in the microwave - it's like fresh as long as it's warm.
     
  16. Captain Picard.

    Captain Picard. Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    I used to freeze my bread but I think it takes the flavor out of it.
     
  17. gturner

    gturner Admiral

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    Couldn't you just spray the loaf with Tinactin, Sporonox, or Fluconizol and get another week out of it?
     
  18. Gary7

    Gary7 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    I've not found refrigerating bread to make it go stale, if it's sealed up well with minimal air inside the plastic bag. It'll delay it from developing mold, and I have plenty of experience in that. But yes, cooler air can make moisture wick out and make it dry. That's why I try to buy a whole loaf and slice it when I need it.

    As for freezing, moisture wicking is more of a problem, so you don't want to leave the bread in there for too long (depending upon how much air you've evacuated from the bag). But I've found that softening it up a little in the microwave prior to toasting tends to achieve a more natural consistency than toasting it frozen.
     
  19. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^It's not the humidity or dryness of the environment, but the temperature that makes it go stale. Bread becomes stale fastest at refrigerator temperatures. Bread doesn't stale because moisture is leaving it -- t's not drying out at all, the chemistry is just changing.
     
  20. Owain Taggart

    Owain Taggart Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    You're right. My bad. I meant fungus. Not sure what I was thinking :)