Is worf a Federation Citizen

Discussion in 'The Next Generation' started by WesleysDisciple, Feb 17, 2013.

  1. Worf'sParmach

    Worf'sParmach Commander Red Shirt

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    Here's my take on it.:

    Worf became a Federation citizen when he was adopted by the Rozhenkos and for most of his life has the 21st century equivalent of "dual citizenship." Being a Federation citizen grants him rights and protections provided by Federation Law. I also think being a Starfleet Officer gives a person Federation citizenship and protection even if their homeplanet is not in the Federation (like Nog or Ro). In "Sins of the Father" Captain Picard refused to allow Worf to be put to death because he is a Starfleet Officer and a member of his crew ..

    Conversely, I think there is a "citizenship" of sorts within the Klingon Empire, but I think it is done through membership to a House. When Worf accepts discommendation in "Sins of the Father" I see that as the Klingon version of revoking his citizenship. He is now an outsider and no longer one of them. He gets his "citizenship" back in Redemption but loses it again in Way of the Warrior (this guy just cannot keep it together!) In the same way, when Worf marries Jadzia, she joins Martok's house as well and becomes a "citizen' of the Empire, with all the rights and responsibilities therein.
     
  2. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

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    DS9 suggests that the Houses are noble families, though, and a class of commoners exists outside the Houses but is as Klingon as any of the nobleKlingons.

    Martok was low-born, but his having a House doesn't exactly go against the idea of Houses being the mark of nobility. He did ascend in social status, after all, through military service. That the House carries his name is an indication of sorts that it has a very short history...

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  3. Mr. Laser Beam

    Mr. Laser Beam Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Perhaps the head of a Klingon House has the right to change its name to their own. If Martok was the eldest surviving member, for example, I'm sure it would qualify as HIS house, since he is the leader of it.
     
  4. LobsterAfternoon

    LobsterAfternoon Commander Red Shirt

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    Perhaps Martok's house is named for a relative of his who was also named Martok? Similar to how Worf seems to be named after Colonel Worf from the sixth movie?
     
  5. T'Girl

    T'Girl Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Simply migrating to a Federation planet (or space station, what have you), and setting up residence there might be all that is require to be considered a "Federation citizen." All the rights, restrictions, and responsibilities are yours.

    I wonder if Jadzia would have been considered a second class citizen? Because, while she was married to a Klingon, she wasn't a biological Klingon herself.

    There are Klingons with family houses, who are on the council.

    There are Klingons with family houses, who are not on the council.

    There are Klingons without membership in a house (commoners).

    Non-Klingons living within the Empire. When Ancient Rome would conqueror a new land, it's residents became Roman citizens (like it or not).

    The occasional rumored slaves.

    :)
     
  6. Worf'sParmach

    Worf'sParmach Commander Red Shirt

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    There are several examples of Kingons referring to a small, non-noble House. The one that comes to mind is at the end of Sons of Mogh when Kurn becomes Rodek. Likewise, Grilka is from a small, relatively unknown House. So I don't think all Houses are noble, and the vast majority of Klingons are a part of a House even if its an insignificant one. In Soldiers of the Empire Jadzia makes a statement to Worf implying that having no House at all is something even the average Klingong would look down on ("how will the crew feel about serving under a man without a House?" Or something like that)
     
  7. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

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    ...Or then the average Klingon feels the need to look up if he's to accept commands. "Small" need not mean "commoner".

    But fair enough, nothing actually establishes Houses as automatically and systematically noble institutions.

    Timo Saloniemi
     

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