Is there a need for a Helm Department?

Discussion in 'General Trek Discussion' started by USS Excelsior, May 10, 2013.

  1. USS Excelsior

    USS Excelsior Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    Location:
    Alpha Quadrant
    Someone also has to maintain and fix the transporters.
     
  2. T'Girl

    T'Girl Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2009
    Location:
    T'Girl
    IIRC, there was no transporter set used in Nemesis. What transporter activity we saw was directly to and from the bridge, outgoing controlled by a bridge console.

    :)
     
  3. Bry_Sinclair

    Bry_Sinclair Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2009
    Location:
    The glorious Shetland Isles!
    In my fanfic, I always have it that the Flight Control Department covers the bridge officer (as well as their relief/cover), the hangar supervisor, shuttle pilots, hangar/shuttle maintenance techs, as well as specialists attached to the navigational systems (such as VOY's elusive 'astrogation plotter') and deflector. It's never a huge department, but it at least adds a few more redshirts to the crew.
     
  4. TheRoyalFamily

    TheRoyalFamily Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2005
    Old-ish pilot joke:

    They started introducing dogs to flight crews. Their job: to bite the pilot if he ever tries to touch the controls.

    As of 2006 (when I was in school for aerospace engineering) the only thing the autopilot couldn't do was taxi to and from the gate. I'm sure that isn't an issue anymore.
     
  5. Galactic Alignment

    Galactic Alignment Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2001
    Location:
    UK
    Spot-on, IMO. Same in all walks of life and in all fields of work - that some basic tasks can be mastered by most people doesn't negate the need for specialist experts. I mean, I can prepare a basic meal with a microwave, kettle and toaster, but doesn't mean that trained chefs are an obsolete profession.
     
  6. Star Wolf

    Star Wolf Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2003
    Location:
    ciudad de Los Angeles
    The problem is that actual human technology of 2013 has surpassed Starfleet technology of 1966.

    Completely automated cars and aircraft are right around the corner and if I was on the newest technology fighter or airliner today I think I would rather have an incapacitated pilot then an inoperable computer.

    With the new systems man just can not keep the flying things stable on their own even if he is Chuck Yeager or Hikaru Sulu. The trick isn't running evasive action sequence gamma or changing course to 124 mark 12.5 the trick is just staying stable and not tearing itself apart in the process of flight.
     
  7. kennysmith

    kennysmith Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Location:
    sacramento ca
    yes there is, when i start up my club it will try to get people to teach other how to do this.
     
  8. C.E. Evans

    C.E. Evans Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2001
    Location:
    Ferguson, MO, USA
    Maybe not. Essentially, all we see is a helmsman do is input flight commands--or course data--into a console. It could be said that the rest (the actual flying of the ship) is automated with the exception of a single manual lever which apparently sends the ship into warp. Evasive maneuvers and various attack patterns may also be pre-programmed flight paths that are initiated by a single button.

    It actually may be far more rare than common for a helmsman to take full manual control. His or her primary job may actually be to input commands, make any necessary course corrections, and to overall monitor the otherwise computer-controlled helm to make sure they're flying in the right direction.
     
  9. kennysmith

    kennysmith Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2013
    Location:
    sacramento ca
    do you know how to navigate 365 from top to bottom or left or right?
     
  10. C.E. Evans

    C.E. Evans Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2001
    Location:
    Ferguson, MO, USA
    It depends on your relative or absolute bearing, but they're generally measured in 360-degree azimuth and elevation angles.