Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Point?

Discussion in 'Star Trek - Original Series' started by Captain Shatner, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. T'Bonz

    T'Bonz Romulan Curmudgeon Administrator

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    This needs to be Star Trek-related, guys.
     
  2. OneBuckFilms

    OneBuckFilms Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    1. What else would I have been referring to? Tell me, because freedom of speech is such a universal concept in liberal democracies, as is the right of protest.

    2. I cannot prove a negative, but I can say that the defined-role-only model of the 10th amendment is the only example of it's kind I know of.

    I have attempted to find contrary examples, but encountered none.

    I guess nobody raised the question as to the uniqueness of the concept or implementation.

    3. Sovereignty is absolutely relevant, regardless of interconnectedness.

    Anyway, back to the real issue at hand:

    I still believe the Federation is a union modeled on the UN, as all of the member worlds seem to have their own political structures, and there are mentions of member worlds being in charge of themselves.
     
  3. OneBuckFilms

    OneBuckFilms Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    Sorry, don't want to become a Tellarite. :)
     
  4. T'Girl

    T'Girl Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    Let see if we can.

    If communications were up to it, the (hopefully well educated) general populace of the Federation could be involved to the point where they directly ran the governance of the Federation, leaving the Council to handle only fast paced problems. Certainly by the 24th century the populace would be directly deciding what the Federations general policies would be.

    Soon after the Federation enter into one of it frequent wars, there would be a referendum as to whether to continue at all, or what the Federation's "exit strategy" would be.

    There could be a Federation wide plebiscite to permit a new member (like Bajor) to join. Or to expel a member species homeworld.

    When T'Pau told Starfleet to stay off Kirk's back at the end of Amok Time, Starfleet listen up rather quickly. And Starfleet was less than all powerful in the Face of Ardana's government.

    Sci, correct me if I'm wrong, but Germany's invasion of Poland was in 1939.

    :devil:
     
  5. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    My history books also 1939, must be a typo.
     
  6. Sci

    Sci Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    It was a typo. Thanks for catching it.
     
  7. CorporalCaptain

    CorporalCaptain Admiral Admiral

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    On the issue of each member having its own government, and of how rights and restrictions transfer across the Federation, in TNG it was shown that applicants for Federation membership were assessed for suitability, which involved determining whether the society was mature enough.

    Perhaps part of that assessment was to make sure that the laws the applicant imposed on its own beings would be sensibly adapted to the alien worlds of the other members, in order to render the question of incompatible rights a non-issue.

    Part of maturity is getting along well with others.
     
  8. OneBuckFilms

    OneBuckFilms Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Re: Is the Federation a True Democracy? And How Did It Reach That Poin

    This makes sense, as the Federarion has guarantees for rights for both member worlds and their populations.

    Given Bajor as an example, it appears that there are options to allow a member world to voluntarily leave.

    The Federation also, from what we've seen, protects free travel and trade between member worlds, and seems to have a unified currency to augment local financial systems, the Federation Credit.
     

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