Inevitable future spectacular catastrophe in the making seen here.

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by Mutara Nebula 1967, Jul 6, 2013.

  1. Pavonis

    Pavonis Commodore Commodore

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    Could you elaborate more on why, though? Is the vacation less relaxing if the facade of the boat is more boxy than sleek? Is the food less edible for being served on a boat that doesn't look streamlined? Will your vacation be ruined by being seen in a vehicle that is more functional than decorative on the outside?
     
  2. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    the Frozen Wastes
    We live on an island. I'm an ex-boat owner and I live in a country where most of the periphery is only contactable by ferry. We live in a country with literally dozens of ferries and all of them, even the oldest CalMac bucket in operation, looks better than that. Even the local ferries look better than that. But more importantly I travel across the Forth Bridge every day so we see all variety of cruise ships parked under the bridge on a visit and there are lovely cruise ships and there are ugly bastard cruise ships and I know which one I would pay my money for.
     
  3. 137th Gebirg

    137th Gebirg Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    Who is John Galt?
    Just sayin'... :shrug:
     
  4. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    A Long Time Ago...
    When I last worked for RC, Freedom had just launched and Oasis was just known as the Genesis Project. Which as a trek fan I found infinitely funny.

    I've worked aboard:

    Navigator
    Legend
    Grandeur
    Enchantment
    Sovereign
    Voyager
    Explorer
    Majesty
    Viking Serenade (just before it was retired. what a crappy boat)
     
  5. Lindley

    Lindley Moderator with a Soul Moderator

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    "Bad name for a ship....either that or this suit is really unlucky.” - The Doctor
     
  6. scotpens

    scotpens Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Los Angeles, CA
    The record for the fastest trans-Atlantic crossing by ship -- the so-called Blue Riband (although there was never an actual medal or trophy) -- was a big deal from the early 20th century through the 1950s. It was a matter of national pride as well as prestige for the ship owners. Today, nobody gives two rat turds about the trans-Atlantic speed record. People take planes nowadays.

    Also, as previously posted, cruise ships and trans-oceanic liners are really two different animals -- although some ships are built to do both jobs.

    That's why modern cruise ships look like floating hotels, both outside and inside. With cruising, the voyage itself is the experience. Oh, and you also get to stop at some touristy ports and buy a lot of tacky souvenirs.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2013
  7. JuanBolio

    JuanBolio Admiral Admiral

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    Florida Keys, USA
    I sincerely hope it happens.

    Major catastrophes are the only way head-in-the-sand people get their blinders knocked off. I'm also looking forward to the next major meteor impact and hopefully the wave of space exploration and control that will follow.
     
  8. Colonel Midnight

    Colonel Midnight Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Colonel Midnight
    The SS United States is (or was -- granted she's around, but basically just a sad rusting hulk along the pier anymore... :() an AMAZING ship. Beautiful, clean lines... just a gorgeous ship.

    The lengths that they went to in designing/building her was incredible -- even the piano, IIRC, was specifically made of aluminum in order to save weight! During the speed run for the Blue Riband, supposedly the paint on the bow was peeling off from the hull speed through the water.

    If you can find a copy, look/read a book called A Man and His Ship[/b[, by Steven Ujifusa. It's basically a biography of William Francis Gibbs (her designer), and his quest to build the SS United States.

    Cheers,
    -CM-
     
  9. scotpens

    scotpens Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yes, the S.S. United States was a beauty in her day.

    [​IMG]

    Sadly, her glory days are long behind her.

    [​IMG]
     
  10. marillion

    marillion Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Workin' in a coal mine...
    Those ships look amazing... Lots of fun to be had by all, I'm sure... If I could handle my irrational fear of drowning, I'd be all in... I just don't like being in water where I can't touch/see the bottom... Has nothing to do with the boat pitching about, either.. I'm all about "thrill rides"... I just have seen too many movies where a ship sinks and the last shot you see is of it shooting down into the darkness with the lights flickering on and off.. Gives me the creeps like you can't believe..
     
  11. Colonel Midnight

    Colonel Midnight Vice Admiral Admiral

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    ^ Your fear of not being able to touch the bottom reminds me of the swim call we had at the Equator. As he was announcing it over the intercom/1MC, the QMOW (Quartermaster of the Watch) said:

    "Now, swim call, swim call, swim call on the starboard side. Temperature of the air is 98 deg; Temperature of the water is 95 deg; Depth of the water is.... (long pause)... uhh, 3 MILES!!"

    (Sorry, just had to be there, as it was hilarious in pacing.)

    Cheers,
    -CM-
     
  12. Jiangnan Freak

    Jiangnan Freak Lieutenant

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    Jul 17, 2013
    That is one ugly ship.
     
  13. Savage Dragon

    Savage Dragon Savage Mod Moderator

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    Ottawa, ON
    Were you able to explore the ships at all? I know most cruise lines prohibit mingling with guests.
     
  14. sojourner

    sojourner Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, at my rank I could use most of the guest facilities. Uniform required at all times. I had to do the occasional "night duty" which basically involved doing rounds of the ship and being seen in dress uniform as well. Mingling was strictly of the meet and greet variety. No "Doc" from the Loveboat interaction.:)

    Being an IT guy I didn't have to spend too much time interacting with guests, which was fine by me. I was never a "front of the house" type.

    Overall working on a cruise ship is a great experience. Just have a skill that gets you some higher rank and privileges before seeking out a job. (and be sure you can handle the work schedules) Most jobs onboard are 8 to 10 hour days with no days off for your entire "contract" of 4 to 8 months on board. You do however get 2 to 4 months of vacation a year.
     
  15. Kirby

    Kirby Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    [Scotty] Not quite as big as her Captain, I think [/Scotty]
     
  16. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

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    Well the Titanic was an Ocean Liner not a cruise ship, intead most if not all of the ships that held the Blue Riband where Ocean Liners. And many of those ships where designed to be bigger/faster/more luxurious (edit as needed) than the predesscor. Sure the Titanic is famous but in terms of the UK to US North Atlantinc run which the Titanic was build along with her sisters vessels to do. Arguable Cunards Queens are just as famous.
     
  17. publiusr

    publiusr Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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  18. rhubarbodendron

    rhubarbodendron Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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  19. scotpens

    scotpens Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Well-proportioned, yes, but not as efficient as modern ships in terms of interior volume and room for passenger amenities. And that's what modern cruising is all about.

    As sojourner pointed out upthread, today's ships are actually quite stable. They have all the heavy stuff at the bottom, while the upper decks are lightweight aluminum. Cruise ships spend most of their time in the relatively calm waters of the Caribbean and Mediterranean seas, not in the rough North Atlantic. And they steer clear of storms.

    Hell, if some things were as top-heavy as they look, Pamela Anderson wouldn't be able to walk without tipping over. :)