How do you deal with Depression?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by Dick Whitman, Nov 24, 2012.

  1. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    They're nothing compared to those cancer patients. If they'd just buck up...


    Actually, JarodRussell, mental illness has a strong biological/physiological foundation. The brain is a part of the body, after all. There are now genetic tests that accurately detect schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia can also be seen in brain structure. Even mental illnesses we traditionally think of as having a stronger psychological base, like eating disorders, have mounting evidence to show that there may be a much stronger physiological component than once thought.

    Medication certainly isn't the answer for everyone, but the idea that it treats only the symptoms and not the cause of depression displays a very simplistic understanding of mental illness. You are right that depression always has a cause, and like many illnesses, the cause is usually a combination of both environment and physioligy. Sometimes that cause is more situational, and in that case medication could be used to treat the symptoms in the hope that it could function as a crutch while the patient works on resolving whatever issues are contributing to the depression. However, sometimes the cause is more physiological, and while non-pharmacological treatments can be successful in treating individuals suffering this kind of depression, medication is often the best choice.
     
  2. Chaos Descending

    Chaos Descending Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Lexapro, Church, Therapy.
     
  3. doubleohfive

    doubleohfive Fleet Admiral

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    I was not aware you had added "M.D." to the end of your name. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Lindley

    Lindley Moderator with a Soul Premium Member

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    Most medication does not control how you feel. It can, however, make it easier to ignore or reduce unhelpful emotions so you can focus on important things without that distraction. It's pretty much the opposite of what you're saying here: what's making it harder is an imbalance in your brain. Fixing that imbalance makes it easier.

    The first medication you try might not be the one you need, of course. You'll have to work with a psychiatrist to figure it out. But it can help.

    The one I linked to earlier, EMPower, is not really an anti-depressant. It's almost just a multi-vitamin, in fact, pretty lightweight as far as meds go.....but it has proven very effective for a lot of people with mood problems.
     
  5. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^I'm sorry Lindley but that EMPower looks pretty shady.
     
  6. Dick Whitman

    Dick Whitman Commodore Commodore

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    I understand and respect the mediation and therapy suggestion. Particularly because I mentioned my grandmother's being Manic Depressive. But after years of thinking it was that I am fairly certain it is not that at all. And I am not certain of much, but this I am.

    Therapy, all that did was make me uncomfortable talking about things I did not want to. It did nothing else. It made me feel worse. I can see how that would help many but it does not fit my personality.

    I don't have time to finish describing this right now. Got to work early.

    I feel like I just don't fit in well in the world. I feel like missed out on too much at a younger age. ANyways I should get ready for work.

    I do appreciate all these suggests. I am considering them
     
  7. Kestra

    Kestra Admiral Premium Member

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    You should also try to understand that therapy is only as good as the therapist you're going to. And even then, it's more about the right fit. There are several different approaches to therapy and people specializing in different types. Perhaps doing a little research in that area may help you find a therapist that would be a better match for your needs.
     
  8. Ryan8bit

    Ryan8bit Commodore Commodore

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    Actually, I believe any speak of "chemical imbalances" is still not a cause. It's likely an effect that is a result of many factors.

    One solution that I think is good, but I don't think has been mentioned yet in this thread is diet. I don't just mean healthy servings of fruits and vegetables, or taking vitamins, but food sensitivities. You might be surprised how many people are affected by something like a gluten sensitivity, and how many of those people are depressed and feel better once they cut it out of their diet.

    If you're really concerned about putting things in your body, perhaps it's time to consider what other things you are putting in your body. Because our brains very much work on chemicals. The food and drink that we consume can have an affect on that chemistry.
     
  9. propita

    propita Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I had a theory that some people have a genetic tendency while others have a malfunction, either in formation of the brain or later. But neither of these is necessarily going to cause various mental issues, they may, but sometimes a triggering event is needed. The trigger could be single, multiple, physical, emotional, etc--all of which will cause the release of various chemicals in the body, one of which is the trigger for that person.

    The more times the trigger gets pulled, the worse the situation may become, until it's self-triggering or permanent, absent intervention. Which is why, with most people, medication and some other action is required.

    I was on anti-depressants for 3 years. During this time, I was tasked with trying again and again to store positive feelings of self-worth. My brain malfunctioned on permanent storage of positive feelings, something in the creation-to-storage pathway did work; negative ones got stored fast as "needed for survival." The meds got the process to function, but I had to keep trying until the pathway was set.

    Analogy: My positive thoughts/feelings had to cross a chasm for storage. I had no bridge, no pathway, because of an error in the formation of my brain. The meds provided the materials for the bridge, but I had to figure out how to build it. You must remember, I had been trying to build the bridge with imaginary materials and didn't have the slightest idea how to build something that most people already have by the time they're 5yo. 100% failure rate prior, but now I had to keep trying. The bridge is built. It's a bit flimsy sometimes, and if I'm not actually DOING anything, I don't really have a lot of accomplishments (materials to build/reinforce the bridge), so things kinda wear down.

    Eh, the shrink said that was a good analogy and asked if he could use/alter it. I like analogy.

    Oh, and Kestra is right about getting the right fit with a therapist. The person might be great at what they do...for some people. But not for you. Not anyone's fault, just a black sock and a white sock instead of a matched pair. Both are good socks otherwise.
     
  10. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    You say "our brains do work very much on chemicals" and then reject the idea that chemical imbalance can be the cause of mental illness? This makes no sense.
     
  11. Coloratura

    Coloratura Snuggle Princess Premium Member

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    Colorful ponies. That's how I deal with depression.
    So far, it has worked fantastically, as while I can still become depressed (yes, that sentence is awful), it's mitigated by the positivity I find in the show and the fandom.
     
  12. doubleohfive

    doubleohfive Fleet Admiral

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    I kick my own ass with exercise.

    Which, ironically enough, tends to have a rather beneficial effect on my ADHD as well.
     
  13. Lindley

    Lindley Moderator with a Soul Premium Member

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    I know. Doesn't change the fact that it has worked for me.
     
  14. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^I have some really serious reservations about it even after only preliminary researching, but I don't think this thread is the right venue to discuss it. I just think it's dangerous to recommend something like this online: think of it this way, if it does work then it must have some pharmacological properties, and really, the only person who should be recommending specific drugs to a patient is a doctor.
     
  15. Lindley

    Lindley Moderator with a Soul Premium Member

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    True enough.
     
  16. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    Let me know when you become a doctor and I'll listen to you. Until then I'll listen to what actual doctors have told me. Depression is caused by chemical imbalances in the brain, chemical imbalances that often times can only be corrected with medication.
     
  17. Ryan8bit

    Ryan8bit Commodore Commodore

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    Mostly I find the term "chemical imbalance" to be somewhat clumsy. It doesn't imply that in itself it is a cause, but rather that there are parts of the brain that are either not producing enough neurotransmitters or the receptors are too closed off to them. Why are those parts of the brain not functioning? What is an actual "balance" of chemicals? And how might your lifestyle choices affect those balances?

    These are good questions that point to the actual root causes, not wishy washy terminology.

    Let me put it this way. Lets say you have an iron deficiency. Is that necessarily the cause of some intestinal pain that you might be having? Or could it be a larger cause like celiac disease? A deficiency alone does not necessarily constitute a cause.

    Spare me the whole doctor spiel. You only say that because you disagree. If I were to use this reasoning, I shouldn't listen at all to what you have to say on the matter either. And it wouldn't really be too hard for me to pull up examples of doctors who believe that "chemical imbalances" aren't the sole cause of depression.

    Take some time to read my response to tsq above. I have no qualms with people taking anti-depressants, and yes chemical imbalances are a part of the processes that affect mental illness, but I still do not believe that it can be described as a cause so much as an effect or symptom.
     
  18. doubleohfive

    doubleohfive Fleet Admiral

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    Unless there are tacos involved. Priorities, people!
     
  19. doubleohfive

    doubleohfive Fleet Admiral

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    (Sorry, Treker... I couldn't resist.)
     
  20. Tora Ziyal

    Tora Ziyal Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yeah. A while back, I did a bit of research on EMPower, because I met a couple people who'd taken it. Didn't help them significantly, and the research looked very iffy. It might be helpful for people who are only mildly depressed to begin with, but I wouldn't encourage someone I loved who was moderately or severely depressed to try it.