Have you heard of this College?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by Kenbushway, May 23, 2013.

  1. Spot's Meow

    Spot's Meow Vice Admiral Premium Member

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    Normally folks go to a different university for their Master's degree than they did for their Bachelor's degree. You can go to the same school for both, it's usually just preferred to have some variety in experience and on your resume. Also, many schools may have strong graduate programs in a specific area but not a very strong undergraduate program in the same subject, or vice versa. Do you want to go to Georgia Tech for your undergraduate or graduate degree?
     
  2. Kenbushway

    Kenbushway Captain Captain

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    I am meeting with an adviser about that when I return to my current college this summer. If I can do it elsewhere then I will but its all about money and location; preferably my graduate degree.
     
  3. B.J.

    B.J. Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Exactly. And I have heard that some of the graduate programs at Georgia Tech don't usually accept their own undergraduates for this exact reason.
     
  4. Timby

    Timby LIKE LIGHTNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIING Administrator

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    In order to get into a graduate program, you will need a bachelor's degree of some kind. A community college will only give you an associate's degree; you will need to transfer your credits to an accredited four-year institution and complete undergraduate coursework there before you even think of a graduate program. You're trying to plan Step J when you're actually needing to focus on Step B.
     
  5. Kenbushway

    Kenbushway Captain Captain

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    Georgia Highlands is a 4 year institution. Its also expensive. Chattahoochee tech offers science classes, I am just trying to see how much I can get for cheap. Like I said its all about money.
     
  6. Timby

    Timby LIKE LIGHTNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIING Administrator

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    Not according to their own website.

    Might want to focus on getting your undergrad work taken care of before you start getting pie-in-the-sky dreams of a master's degree in physics.
     
  7. RoJoHen

    RoJoHen Awesome Premium Member

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    Indeed. Four years is a long time, and there is a lot of work to do before you should even start thinking about grad school. Who knows what might change between now and then?
     
  8. Chensams

    Chensams Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I was rooting for GT. Can't stand Kiffen.
     
  9. Kenbushway

    Kenbushway Captain Captain

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    Well that isn't a possibility, Southern polytechnic State University is my only other option. I know that is a 4 year school for sure.
     
  10. propita

    propita Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I only ask because I remember my Dad (who had a BS in Mech Eng out of USC--that's Trojans, not Carolina) used to say their motto(?) "I'm a Ramblin' Wreck from Georgia Tech." For the life of me, I can't remember why. Maybe during a football game on tv? He used to watch those every Saturday. Strange how that's a great memory of Dad.
     
  11. Tora Ziyal

    Tora Ziyal Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Isn't that the truth!

    I started college intending to major in Subject #1, but after one semester figured out that I was more interested Subject #2, so I majored in that. Then they dropped the courses I was most interested in, so I unhappily shifted to Subject #3. By junior year, I realized that where I really wanted to be was Subject #4, but it would've taken an extra semester to graduate, and I just wasn't that motivated, so I stayed with Subject #3.

    A couple years later, I got a masters in Subject #5, which was related to what they had eliminated from Subject #2. Not sure why I didn't go for Subject #2 itself. Probably just because #5 was a shorter program and available at a university within walking distance of my apartment. About 15 years later -- obviously way more motivated by then -- I finally went and got a masters in Subject #4.

    :lol:
     
  12. Nerys Myk

    Nerys Myk Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    All I know, is that I was disappointed that Trip Tucker didn't go the Georgia Tech.
     
  13. Kestrel

    Kestrel Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Ha, that would've been pretty sweet.
     
  14. jayceee

    jayceee Commander Red Shirt

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    What area of physics?
     
  15. SmoothieX

    SmoothieX Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Physics turned me from a physics heavy major to a chemistry heavy one.
     
  16. jayceee

    jayceee Commander Red Shirt

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    I remember freshman/sophomore physics frequently turned off a lot of freshman and sophomore engineering majors.

    At quite a number of universities, the freshman/sophomore physics sequence of courses were used as "weed out" courses to kick out as many engineering majors as possible. Especially after the first course on classical mechanics. The second (or third) course on electricity and magnetism further "thinned out the herd".
     
  17. SmoothieX

    SmoothieX Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I took an electrical systems class through the engineering school rather than subject myself to Physics II.
     
  18. jayceee

    jayceee Commander Red Shirt

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    I didn't take a lot of physics towards the end of my time in college. Just the freshman/sophomore sequence which the engineering majors had to take, and several optional courses like modern physics (basically an intro to quantum mechanics course for engineering majors) and an intermediate course on classical mechanics (mostly Lagrangian stuff).

    The intermediate classical mechanics course actually helped quite a lot in understanding and appreciating the basic quantum mechanics stuff (in the modern physics course), which would otherwise seem like a "deus ex machina". (I took that intermediate classical mechanics course and also an "advanced math methods for engineers" course in the previous semester, before taking that modern physics for engineers course).
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2013

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