Grammar Nazi Thread: Smooshing Words Together

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by scotpens, Apr 22, 2013.

  1. teacake

    teacake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    :guffaw: :guffaw: :guffaw:

    Oh dear best laugh I've had all day!

    Australians generally only use rhyming slang when overseas or faced with a mob of english speakers from another country when they have to desperately dredge up any distinctiveness and parade it around the place, the more cryptic the better. It's very old school stuff.
     
  2. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^I'm baffled! What's milhous?!
     
  3. Flux Capacitor

    Flux Capacitor Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    [yt]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M67E9mpwBpM[/yt]

    :)
     
  4. teacake

    teacake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Milhouse is a dweeby fellow from the Simpsons who when things finally went his way one episode declared, "everything's coming up milhouse!"

    I'm just using words invented this century to prove my point without banging on and frakking with your patience.
     
  5. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    I forgot that scene! Awwwww. That was adorable.
     
  6. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    Bitch, for ten minutes I was trying to get "everything's coming up roses" to rhyme with Nixon! :lol:
     
  7. JoeZhang

    JoeZhang Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I think I confused people in the Voyager forum when I made reference to Neelix being on the 'intergalactic nonce jotter'

    Nonce = Pedophile

    Jotter = Register/notebook
     
  8. teacake

    teacake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    You can't do that tsq, only Nixon can go to China.
     
  9. teacake

    teacake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    We probably just thought you were Guy.
     
  10. JoeZhang

    JoeZhang Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I can see the confusion, Guy is a Kiwi and comes from a place with lots of sheep, I am a sheep-shagger (Welsh*).




    * when it suits me.
     
  11. teacake

    teacake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    With my impending decrepitude what I need is a mutton shagger.
     
  12. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

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    You've also go to remember that just because people speak the same language their can be subtle or not so subtle differences between them. A word such as deplane might be used say in North America whilst in say the UK and Commonwealth countries disembark would be used instead.
     
  13. lvsxy808

    lvsxy808 Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    My point is that it's an unnecessary word. A word already exists to describe that concept - "disembark," as Macleod says. I'm all for new words to describe new concepts. Of course Chaucer didn't have a word for "internet," because he didn't need one. Likewise there's no need to create a new word to describe "disembark" when there's already a perfectly good word that serves the purpose. After seven years of living in the States, I have to say my impression wasn't that it was a dialectal difference, but rather ignorance of the fact that the word "disembark" exists at all.

    Likewise, usage of such non-words as "winningest" on Nascar commentary makes me want to stab a bitch.


    I never said they were identical - I know they're not. But what possible middle ground is there between the two that requires a whole new word to describe it? Either something is an educated calculation (thus an "estimate") or it's not (thus a "guess").

    It's like when people say "more unique." Impossible! "Unique" is an absolute state, it is not subject to gradation.

    .
     
  14. Jim Gamma

    Jim Gamma This space left blank intentionally. Premium Member

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    Well, you say that, but "embark" comes from Middle French "Embarquer", with Em- being from "En" meaning in, and "Barque" meaning ship. So you're actually saying you're boarding a ship, not an aircraft, when you embark. (Barque came from the Latin Barca, meaning ship.)

    Thus, dis-em-bark would mean to get off a ship. I can certainly see the point in having a specific alternative for aircraft. :)

    (Of course, it's also true that you "embark" on a journey - this is a broadening of the original meaning, and lends support to the thought that we don't need any such alternative, but some people just prefer to be specific about their mode of transport.)
     
  15. teacake

    teacake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    Just leave English alone!! Organic, that's your word. Stuff shifts and drifts and changes.
     
  16. Retu

    Retu Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    "Deplane" sounds like someone is trying to pull the poor airplane's wings off.
     
  17. Starkers

    Starkers Admiral Admiral

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    Isn't deplane what Tattoo used to yell on Fantasy Island?
     
  18. teacake

    teacake Fleet Admiral Admiral

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  19. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

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    Well the definition of disembark is

    Leave a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle.

    And you can make a case for an aircraft being a ship, it's just a ship which travels through air instead of say the water or space.

    But language evolve and change overtime, some languages at a faster pace than others.
     
  20. Foxhot

    Foxhot Commodore Commodore

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    Is ''ginormous'' a real word now? Furthermoron......why do we even need it??
     

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