Do turbolifts have any sense?

Discussion in 'Trek Tech' started by Faria, May 22, 2013.

  1. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    I think not.

    The ships aren't big enough, for , maybe, the excaption of galaxy class.

    Turbolisf are just a waste of space.

    They could have some sense if they connect just some critical point of the ship (bridge, engineering,sickbay, officer quarters), but just for really big ship.
     
  2. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2001
    Location:
    Great Britain
    Turbolifts are hardly a waste of space, how much internal volume do those ships have.
     
  3. Pavonis

    Pavonis Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    Turbo lifts are a problem now? What's the alternative - stairs? Ladders? Maybe site-to-site transporters?
     
  4. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    stairs, normal lift, corridors and more corridors, like today's ships
     
  5. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    A waste of space is a waste of space, even in a ship with a big internal volume
     
  6. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2001
    Location:
    Great Britain
    Let's see, what's the difference between having more corridors, and more staircases instead of a turbolift shaft?

    Wouldn't a corridor and more corridors and staircase(s) take up space as well?

    Your reasoning is non sequitor. You are saying that turbolift shafts take up space, but to replace them by corridors which also take up space.
     
  7. Robert Comsol

    Robert Comsol Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2012
    Location:
    USS Berlin
    Kirk's TV Enterprise had a sickbay that needed to receive incoming emergencies from the transporter rooms and I have a hard time imagining how to move any of these TOS stretcher trolleys from here to there other than by means of some kind of elevator.

    And walking from the Bridge to the Hangar Deck would then be less a waste of space but definitely a waste of time, wouldn't it?

    Bob
     
  8. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    an imagine is better rhan 1000 words:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    [​IMG]

    from bridge to hangar:

    1-take a lift on the bridge to deck 5
    2- walk for about 50 meters to a lift from deck 5 to a lift for deck 17
    3-walk for another 50 meters

    a walk of 100 metrs, sustenable
     
  10. MacLeod

    MacLeod Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2001
    Location:
    Great Britain
    Yes some jounreys might be more efficent walking than taking a turbolift, but thats no different than today. Where some people drive half a quarter mile to a shop to buy a paper instead of walking to the shop.

    The simple solution would be to have a transporter room next to sick bay. Or falling that at least on the same deck.

    As for deck plans available online I'd take those with a pinch of salt.
     
  11. Albertese

    Albertese Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    May 3, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR

    You may have misunderstood that drawing... Here's the same trip you tried to plot, using brown for the corridors and blue for the turbolifts. You can see the turbolift is a way more direct route. To go on foot, you have to cut through the Rec Deck! It seems like, at least on this version, the designers are assuming that turbolifts are the primary means of moving around on the ship.


    [​IMG]

    --Alex
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2013
  12. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    my draw was iuntended for a situatin where turbolifts don't work
     
  13. The Librarian

    The Librarian Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2002
    While some deck plans go overboard in my opinion and need more stairs, you really do need to have lifts to get around a ship that size. It's the vertical component that's the main problem. The Defiant would do fine without lifts, but trying to climb up and down twenty decks to go from the bridge to engineering would be time consuming and exhausting, and dangerous when rapid transit is needed.
     
  14. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    Normal lifts are ok, orizontal lift are not
     
  15. Faria

    Faria Lieutenant Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2012
    Location:
    Padova
    whay program did you use to do this?
     
  16. Pavonis

    Pavonis Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2001
    So your objection to horizontal lift tubes is that they make navigating the ship awkward if they are out of service. Yet if the lift network is out of order, navigating the ship at all would be awkward. Those vertical tubes would be just as useless as the horizontal tubes.
     
  17. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    The real difference between corridors and turboshafts is that you can walk across a corridor. If a set of cabins is to be provided access by corridor, the corridor goes through two rows of cabins and each has a door opening into the corridor. If the access is exclusively by turbolift, same thing. But if you want both types of access (a definite must in emergencies), then turboshafts severely block corridors (at each cabin door!), whereas corridors don't block other corridors at all, and only block turboshafts at key junctions. You really don't want a corridor and a shaft running parallel because that blocks 50% of corridor access - but you don't want shafts crossing corridors, either, because that truncates and terminates the corridor.

    So what you do want is shafts that dodge and weave, climbing over or diving under corridors - but that sounds like a nasty thing to turbocab speed and durability, as all those tight turns must be hell on the machinery.

    The alternative is vertical dodging and weaving by corridors rather than shafts, which would make a lot of sense but is prohibitively complex to do on a TV studio floor.

    The best alternative would be to have entire decks dedicated to turboshafts, between corridor decks; there's probably plenty of random machinery that needs to go between decks in any case, enough to justify a "tween deck" just barely high enough for a horizontal turboshaft (or then just barely not high enough, so that you have the occasional slight bump on a corridor floor and the occasional low overhang on a corridor ceiling; might look cool).

    Also, they are creating maximum compatibility with what we really see happen in the episodes: our heroes walking on a short section of a curved corridor and its radial branch, which is all that exists on the set. This is how you access a random room with a long but fast lift ride and a short but slow walk; if you walked along a greater length of a curved corridor (and thus out of the set!), or took a multiple series of curves and radials, you'd be trespassing on territory better accessed by taking the lift to a closer terminal.

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  18. Albertese

    Albertese Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    May 3, 2003
    Location:
    Portland, OR
    Adobe Photoshop CS5

    --Alex
     
  19. TwoJakes

    TwoJakes Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2011
    Location:
    Miami, Fl
    In addition to carrying personel, the turbolift would carry items too, some weighing in the tonnes.

    It's alway made sense to me that most things on the ship could be disassembled to the point where they would fit into a turbolift car.

    :)
     
  20. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2003
    ...Whether a stretcher patient would be among those things, I dare not speculate! :eek:

    OTOH, if you are going to haul a patient around on futuristic stretchers, you no doubt make sure that they

    a) hover on their own power
    b) hold the patient in place with artificial gravity or the like
    c) make the patient immune to accelerations with inertia-damping fields

    in which case it's trivial to simply flip the stretchers to a vertical position when they need to fit inside a turbolift.

    It just seems that with conventional stretchers, you indeed have to do some disassembly first, at least on the TOS elevators.

    Timo Saloniemi
     

Share This Page