Current novels set in the TV time-frame?

Discussion in 'Trek Literature' started by MikeS, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    Jeff has written a couple of very good CSI novels, not to mention his own Weird Western comic book series . . ..

    And Marco, of course, is an editor at Tor these days.
     
  2. Thrawn

    Thrawn Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    ^ I loved almost everything he commissioned for Trek, I've been wondering - is there any easy way to find out what books he's commissioned for Tor? I asked him and he said he'd probably post them on his blog, but that hasn't happened.
     
  3. Defcon

    Defcon Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    One book he seem to have commissioned is:

    The Emperor's Blade by Brian Staveley

    Marco retweeted a Tweet by the author announcing the book, so I searched a bit on the author's Facebook and found this (the title in the post was only the working title):

     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2013
  4. Thrawn

    Thrawn Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Thanks.
     
  5. Greg Cox

    Greg Cox Admiral Premium Member

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    I believe he also edited Three Parts Dead by Max Gladstone.

    Crediting editors can be a bit tricky sometimes. It's entirely possible, at Tor and Pocket and everywhere else, for a book to be acquired by one editor, edited by another, and maybe re-edited by yet another editor, just because of staff turnovers, editorial realignments, creative differences, and so on.

    Case in point: To Reign in Hell was acquired by John Ordover, who worked closely with me on the original outline, but John had departed for greener pastures by the time I delivered the actual manuscript, which was edited by Ed Schlesinger. Ditto for my second Underworld book.

    That sort of thing happens all the time. It's not at all uncommon for a manuscript to pass through two or three editors on its way to publication.

    Heck, sometimes it's just a matter of lightening somebody's workload. "Hey, Greg. Sybill is swamped with the Space Vixens books. Would you mind taking over the vampire romances for the time being?"
     
  6. MikeS

    MikeS Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Why was Marco Palmieri laid-off? The DS9 relaunch was a very enjoyable series of books.
     
  7. ryan123450

    ryan123450 Commodore Commodore

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  8. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Remember how the global economy crashed late in 2008? The American publishing industry was hit very hard and publishers had to desperately cut costs in order to avoid bankruptcy. Simon & Schuster had to lay off dozens of people in dozens of departments, lightening their load as much as they could. At the time, Pocket's media tie-in department had several editors on staff, and the cost-cutters decided that was a redundancy they could do without. Since their only consideration was saving money, they laid off the editor who had the highest salary -- who happened to be named Marco Palmieri. The fact that he'd earned that salary by doing such superb work was of no concern; they were bailing out a sinking ship, trying to stay afloat, and that was their only consideration. A lot of people at S&S and other publishers lost their jobs for reasons that had nothing to do with their performance. (Recall that a few months later, the other main Trek editor at the time, Margaret Clark, was also laid off in the second set of companywide purges.) The economic crash affected our lives in many ways, and this was how it affected Simon & Schuster.

    But fortunately the economy eventually began to recover, publishers started hiring again, and Marco was hired as an editor by Tor Books, where I think he's very happy to be.
     
  9. Stevil2001

    Stevil2001 Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Yeah, thanks to the editorial shakeups at Pocket, The Tears of Eridanus was acquired by Marco Palmieri, submitted to Margaret Clarke, edited by Jaime Costas, and seen through the final stages of publication by Emilia Pisani!
     

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