Crusher Out of Control in "The Enemy"

Discussion in 'The Next Generation' started by Clark Terrell, Mar 13, 2014.

  1. Flake

    Flake Commodore Commodore

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    On top of all this, Crusher didn't even keep Picard up to date!

    He calls Worf to the ready room and has an entire speech scene trying to nudge Worf into making the 'right' decision of saving the Romulans life and after all that speech he contacts Bev to tell her not to ask for Worfs help.... and she tells him it doesnt matter anymore because hes died !

    Well for goodness sake woman you could have told me before I made my speech and saved me the bother :klingon: What a waste!

    What if he said 'Sorry Captain, I will donate my blood immediately. I have seen the error of my ways'

    'Excellent Mr Worf, I will accompany you to sickbay' (Where they find him dead :p )
     
  2. Clark Terrell

    Clark Terrell Lieutenant Commander

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    And then she brings the incident up again a few weeks later during "The Defector." And why? To take a shot at Worf for doing something she didn't approve of.
     
  3. urbandefault

    urbandefault Commodore Commodore

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    I don't remember details of this one, so I'm going off the posts in this thread ...

    The Romulan was a prisoner of war, if not officially. Crusher's first duty is to preserve the life of her patients, and especially that of a prisoner. Starfleet does not kill its prisoners.

    Worf refused to submit to the procedure (transfusion?) and the Romulan (Patahk? :lol:) refused treatment. In that case, the prisoner should have been immediately placed in stasis until another donor could be located or until he could be transferred to a Romulan ship.

    I'm sure there were plenty of plot complications built in to prevent this simple solution.

    But the story might have been better if Picard had made such a compelling argument that Worf agreed to the procedure, only to find that the prisoner had died.

    Then Worf would have his own internal conflict to deal with, resulting in character growth.

    But as I said, I don't really remember this episode.
     
  4. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    He was neither a prisoner nor a "prisoner of war" as the Romulans and Federation were not at war. (At most they were in a "cold war.")

    The Enterprise found a crashed Romulan scout ship on a Federation planet and rescued, presumably, its only crew member. He had severe injuries probably exasperated by the conditions on the planet on his physiology. He needed some kind of transfusion (not strictly a blood transfusion but some other body greeble made up for the show) to survive his injuries. Crusher tested Enterprise crew members to find a match and turned out Worf was the only match. (He did not have a problem with being tested.) Crusher tried to enlist Worf's donation but he refused citing personal/cultural disagreements with the Romulans. The Romulan seemed to hold similar biases.

    The Romulan was never considered a captor.

    Communications with an incoming Warbird revealed tensions between Picard and the Romulan Commander. Picard refused to allow the Warbird to enter Federation space so that they could come and retrieve their fallen comrade. At the same time Picard refused to bring the injured Romulan to the TNZ so the Warbird could retrieve him because Geordi was still lost on the planet and they were awaiting in a window for sensors to find him/transporters to work.

    The Romulan Warbird eventually broke The Neutral Zone and got to the planet where a confrontation (mostly chest puffing) occurred between Picard and the Romulan Commander. By this time the injured Romulan had succumbed to his injuries.

    (All of this time there's question on why the Romulan scout ship had violated The Neutral Zone treaty and how many crew members were on the crashed ship.)

    Meanwhile on the planet Geordi meets another survivor of the crashed ship. Both are suffering the effects of the planet's radiation/magnetic field. It's made Geordi's VISOR useless to him as visual aid and it's made the Romulan weak. There's some initial tensions between the two (The Romulan posturing that Geordi is "his prisoner" and will be captured when the Romulans return) but eventually they overcome their differences to find a solution to get off the planet. Geordi is able to direct the Romulan on how to combine the VISOR with a tricorder to get it to pick up the signal of a nearby probe to use it as a homing signal to the Enterprise.

    The Enterprise receives the homing signal and in act of "trust" to the Romulans drops the shields and beams Geordi and the crash survivor to the Enterprise. Picard assures the Romulan he will not be harmed. The surviving Romulan reports to his commander that he has revealed no information, and has survived due to the help of Geordi. Picard then releases the Romulan to Romulan Commander and, presumably, escorts them back to TNZ.

    Again, I think it's really a good episode to show the contrasts of the way different people in the episode treat "the enemy." On the one hand we have Worf refusing to help the injured Romulan survive as well as the injured Romulan refusing treatment. We have the posturing between Picard and the Romulan commander over protocols and the treaties keeping a semblance of "peace" between the two peoples.

    And then we have Geordi and the Romulan on the planet working through their differences and working together to solve their mutual problem. There's even a nice moment where the Romulan seems surprised Geordi's parents "let him live" due to his disability. But it ends up being that disability (namely the prosthetic that allows him to live through that disability) that helps save the both of them.

    As I said above the biggest problem I have is that Picard seems a bit needlessly irrational in the episode. Given the information he has, that the injured Romulan was the only man on the crashed ship, it seems like it would be in his and the Federation's best interests for that man to survive lest it make more problems with the Romulans.

    It's illogical that Picard refused to allow the Romulan ship to come sooner so they could treat their injured man or that Picard didn't take the ship to TNZ to deliver the injured Romulan. He was putting the life of ONE crew member on the planet over the possibility of higher tensions or war with the Romulans. Picard's a smart man and he should have seen this.

    As I said up-thread he could have allowed the Romulans to come get their man provided during the trip they take a specified route and stayed uncloaked. At that time the "excuse" by the Romulans was that the crashed ship crossed TNZ into Federation space due to a navigational error. Very likely a lie, and Picard knew this, but he could have given the benefit of the doubt and dealt with that issue later.

    His #1 priority in that situation should have made sure that the Romulan he was housing lived and was given every opportunity to live. If his personal ethics, or the ethics of Starfleet, preclude him "ordering" someone to undergo a medical procedure against their wishes then his hands are tied. There's only one place that Romulan can get the treatment he needs and that's on a Romulan ship. Picard should have allowed the Romulan to get there. If he had to abandon Geordi on the planet in order to take the Romulan to TNZ then that's the risk Geordi took when he signed up for Starfleet.

    If he has to allow one Romulan ship in this very special circumstance to cross TNZ then so be it.

    But, again, that was all sort of the point of the episode. The different ways we treat "the enemy." And in all of it, clearly, Geordi and the planetside Romulan survivor handled it the best.
     
  5. Nightdiamond

    Nightdiamond Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Like why go to a Klingon when Vulcans are actually related to Romulans and should be more likely to provide a better match? :lol:

    I'll give Worf the benefit of the doubt for a moment.

    It would have to be really grating for someone pressure you to save the life of your worse enemy - as in someone who calls you or your culture filth.

    With Worf being a super proud Klingon, it was obvious he wasn't going to be willing to do it.

    I think Beverly Crusher represents the conscience of Starfleet. She is always the first to speak out against anything she sees is wrong.

    That's why we need people like her on Trek-it makes future humans look so much better than we are now.

    And yet she can be so 'enlightened' that she sometimes comes off as naive, like in Chain of Command.
     
  6. Clark Terrell

    Clark Terrell Lieutenant Commander

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    I don't know that she was naïve so much as bitter. Her comment to Jellico about having sickbay ready for casualties was priceless.
     
  7. JarodRussell

    JarodRussell Vice Admiral Admiral

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    If a black racist doesn't want a bone marrow transplant from a compatible white racist, who in turn refuses to give it to the black one, the DOCTOR is to blame for trying to convince both to save a life? What kind of messed up world view is that? Shouldn't the racists be blamed for their stubborn bigotry?
     
  8. Clark Terrell

    Clark Terrell Lieutenant Commander

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    Yes, they should. But the problem with your analogy is that both parties in your example are human and have been raised with human values. It's not difficult to see who's in the wrong when applying human values to a scenario involving only human participants. But the same values can't be applied to a situation involving Klingons and Romulans, who've been enemies for decades.

    And I don't blame Crusher for trying to get Worf to do the right thing. I blame her for continuing to raise the issue after he'd made his feelings clear, and for apparently failing to consider the Romulan's wishes, as he didn't want Worf's help any more than Worf wanted to help him.
     
  9. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    No one is saying Worf is "right" in denying the donation or that the Romulan was "right" in potentially refusing the donation.

    Just that once the potential donor said "No", Crusher should have dropped it. And if her PATIENT was saying "No" then she certainly should have dropped it. Have him sign an AMA form or something and show it to Tomalak. "Look, your guy could have been saved but he was being kind of a dick so, what can you do?"

    Since she was a doctor saving a life Crusher is probably the "better" one of the three but she certainly isn't 100% in the right in this messed-up situation either.
     
  10. Armored Saint

    Armored Saint Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    The great naive was DaiMon Solok. (And I'm jealous of this naive.:drool:)
     
  11. The Old Mixer

    The Old Mixer Clean Old Mod Moderator

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    That would have been an unlikely situation, what with the Enterprise fighting the Japanese in the Pacific and all. Not a lot of carrier action in the European theater.
     
  12. PhoenixClass

    PhoenixClass Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    It's not inappropriate to show someone the consequences of his actions. Which is what Crusher did by introducing Worf to the Romulan.
     
  13. starburst

    starburst Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Ive always had the impression that shooting those under your command was reserved for desertion and treason not for refusing to donate organs risking your immediate life and long term health in the process.

    If this is/was ever an American Military attitude then to be honest most would consider the idea that maybe the wrong side won the war... and if this ever had happened it would have sullied the name Enterprise for me personally.


    Well yes there is that small fact which tears my analogy apart but trading Enterprise's.

    Yes they are to blame but no matter the basis of their issue the Doctor cant force one or both to go through with it.

    If Picard had ordered those involved to perform the transfusion I have no doubt we would be discussing the moral issues of forcing someone to go through with a procedure, even a life saving one, which you could assume would have shortly led to the Romulan committing suicide due to now being 'tainted' with 'dirty' Klingon blood.
     
  14. Clark Terrell

    Clark Terrell Lieutenant Commander

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    But the consequences of whose actions? Worf refused to be a donor, but the Romulan also refused his help. The Romulan's death was the result of two people's choices, not one as Crusher (and Picard) seemed to believe.
     
  15. Tosk

    Tosk Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    The death of an individual is nothing compared to slightly offending someone.
     
  16. Clark Terrell

    Clark Terrell Lieutenant Commander

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    Has anyone here said otherwise?
     
  17. Mojochi

    Mojochi Commodore Commodore

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    The Romulan doesn't get a say, as his superior officers threateningly demanded his safe return, & Worf only gets a choice in so much as Picard allows it, which I believe was done to demonstrate to Worf the liberty in Starfleet, & the duty that comes with it
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2014
  18. Timo

    Timo Admiral Admiral

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    I sort of imagine Picard hailing Crusher in the middle of a delicate surgery, and the beep makes her hand slip. "Thanks for calling, Sir, he's dead now. Or perhaps I should say thanks to." :devil:

    Seriously, knives, I can't really imagine Crusher taking her time to report the death. It probably just happened to coincide with Picard calling.

    How so? Romulans respect shows of force. Picard could call them that he had located a survivor from an illegal spying mission, tortured him to death, and has recommended that the UFP send an ultimatum to the RSE regarding the matter. Meanwhile, Tomalak is allowed to come retrieve the body, in a Federation transport escorted by Starfleet warships. But he has to sign a confession to authorizing the spy mission first. That would minimize current and future problems with Romulans.

    As you say, though, this is about different cultures clashing, aboard Picard's ship as well as outside it. From what we know of the Romulan culture, Tomalak would not have fired anyway, not unless Picard fired first, and Picard wouldn't do that, so we can forget about that part of the tension-building. Picard holds all the trump cards here, but if he plays them and defeats Tomalak, he betrays the policies he wants to promote. It's a PR gig rather than a combat engagement, and Picard has to make sure his side comes out smelling of roses.

    Yet not any old roses, but only those roses deemed acceptable in a complex analysis of the interactions with this odd and alien culture. So "showing humane sentiment" won't work, but playing hardball the Romulan way won't win the required points, either.

    It's not particularly likely that species identity would be relevant here. After all, all humanoid species in Trek are more or less the same, capable of interbreeding and whatnot. Clearly, Klingons and humans have the same medicobabble elements in their blood as Vulcans and Romulans here, as Crusher is studying them all for compatibility.

    But you wouldn't care, because the Nazi atom bomb would have killed you.

    That's the emphasis here: soldiers are supposed to die for their country as needed, and sometimes the need is particularly great. The sterile atmosphere of "The Enemy" fools people into thinking that the need in this particular occasion wasn't particularly great, but other elements in the episode suggest that it was at least comparable to Nazi A-bomb secrets being at stake.

    As for wrong sides winning wars, that invariably happens. You can't win a war without being on the wrong side - the one committing the greater offenses to humanity, i.e. the most murders and/or the worst deterrence demonstrations. Winners simply stand on the tallest piles of skulls.

    Timo Saloniemi
     
  19. Tosk

    Tosk Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    I sure hope so.
     
  20. Trekker4747

    Trekker4747 Boldly going... Premium Member

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    In a medical situation, I'd say it is. Worf's body, Worf's choice. Do you think a present-day doctor would have you meet face-to-face a man you refuse to donate blood for or donate a kidney or part of your liver to?