Could a Lost Era set between 2161 and 2265 work?

Discussion in 'Trek Literature' started by Mage, Aug 21, 2011.

  1. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2001
    Yes, but one that diverged only in the late 2230s. Assuming Thelin was somewhere around Spock's age, we know the Aenar must've survived at least that long. Indeed, there's no reason to believe that Thelin doesn't exist in the Prime timeline. His Starfleet career would've turned out differently if Spock had died at age 7, but there's no reason why that would've prevented Thelin's birth.
     
  2. Mysterion

    Mysterion Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2001
    Location:
    SB-31, Daran V
    There are a couple fanzine-published stories by Leslie Fish written in the 70s that deal with Thelin in the prime Trek timeline.
     
  3. JD

    JD Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Location:
    Arizona, USA
    Ah, you're right. I always forget that that universe had the specific divergence point of Spock dying.
     
  4. Therin of Andor

    Therin of Andor Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2004
    Location:
    New Therin Park, Andor (via Australia)
    And his Aunt Shras! ;)
     
  5. bok2384

    bok2384 Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Location:
    Warwickshire, UK
    For the record, The Fire and the Rose stated that Commander Thelin th'Valrass had died by the late 2260s, killed in an avalanche during a survery of an unexplored planet while assigned as first officer aboard the USS Ticonderoga.

    Of course, the Crucible trilogy is set in its own continuity, but I personally believe that the point of divergence isn't until 2267 during "The City on the Edge of Forever" and, there is no other evidence elsewhere in licensed material to discount this.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2011
  6. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2001
    There are differences of interpretation between Crucible and the rest of the Trek Lit continuity that preclude it being explained as simply an alternate timeline. For instance, its explanation of what chronitons are is inconsistent with DTI: Watching the Clock and Forgotten History. Also, several minor characters from TOS are given different first names in Crucible than they were in other Trek lit -- for instance, Crucible has Ed Leslie and John Kyle while other Trek lit calls them Ryan Leslie and Winston Kyle.

    (Sorry it took so long to reply... I forgot to clear my browser cache and just kept getting the "BBS is closed" message for days. Oops.)
     
  7. bok2384

    bok2384 Commander Red Shirt

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2006
    Location:
    Warwickshire, UK
    Good points, Christopher, and I thank you for your reply. With regards to different explanations for chronitons, I didn't remember that, but it would be the sort of detail that I would overlook to be completely honest.

    As for the different names given for the various TOS recurring characters, your point is taken, however various different novels and comics have given varying names to the TOS characters over the years, so that's not really a deal breaker for me. If this was a barometer of a different timeline/continuity, then The Buried Age would be placed in a different one from Q & A, because Lieutenant Torres (from "Encounter at Farpoint") was given a different first name in each.
     
  8. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2001
    Well, the point is, the authors seem content to treat Crucible as an alternate fictional interpretation rather than a parallel timeline within the same metacontinuity (because it was consciously conceived as being a standalone work with no continuity ties to the other literature, just to TOS & TAS themselves), so whatever Crucible established about the fate of Thelin would not in any way preclude a live, adult Thelin from turning up in a main-continuity novel.
     
  9. Leto_II

    Leto_II Captain Captain

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2013
    Location:
    Room 303, The Heart O' The City Hotel
    In one of the Vanguard novels, set in the mid-2260s, it's mentioned that Starfleet Intelligence has recently become aware of a "new" alien government nearby, the Cardassian Union.

    Also, in Margaret Wander Bonnano's movie-era novel Unspoken Truth, set in 2286 (the same year as Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home), it's mentioned that the Starfleet captain of the science vessel that Lt. Saavik signs onto hails from a Federation colony world on the Cardassian border, whose settlers were forced to toughen themselves up, due to facing the Cardassian threat on a daily basis, etc.

    So there definitely was some knowledge of them as far back as Kirk's 5YM (and well into the TOS movie era), although of course in the Prime Universe, the Federation didn't make "official" first contact with them until the early 24th century or thereabouts...more likely "proper" open diplomatic relations in this case, supplanting the "unofficial" border brushfire-skirmishes that had been the norm for several decades by that point.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2014
  10. Dimesdan

    Dimesdan Living the Irish dream. Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Location:
    The Republic of Ireland
    Brains?

    Cheers for clarifying that given I actually wrote what you quoted nearly three years ago.
     
  11. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2001
    I'm glad this is a 3-year-old bumped thread, because the title's kind of weird in the context of what I've been writing for the past couple of years...
     
  12. Enterprise1701

    Enterprise1701 Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2014
    Location:
    Sol III, Sector 001, 2016 C.E.
    Personally I think it's silly that TOS era novels are making the Cardassians that well-known already in that era, but given that the Klingon-Cardassian Alliance conquered the Terran Empire in 2295, I guess I no longer have a valid objection.

    What do y'all think about how Kobayashi Maru has the Vulcans already knowing about the Breen in 2155?
     
  13. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2001
    I don't see how it's a problem. Korea, for instance, first became aware of the West around the 1600s, but it wasn't until the 19th century that they had ongoing interactions with the West and not until the 20th that the Korean War happened.

    And it's a big galaxy. Being aware that another power exists doesn't automatically equate to having found the time to explore and study their society in depth -- not when there are so many other civilizations to explore and study and only a finite amount of time and resources to do it with.
     
  14. Avro Arrow

    Avro Arrow Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2003
    Location:
    In Diefenbaker's Nightmares
    I guess that definitively answers the thread, though... it works just fine! :techman: