Cosmos - With Neil deGrasse Tyson

Discussion in 'TV & Media' started by Ancient Mariner, Jul 23, 2013.

  1. Frontman

    Frontman Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    I like the show. The original "Cosmos" was more vehicle for Carl Sagan himself who was very in love with himself with long close-ups to his face and him constantly pursing his lips. Carl would never let long cartoon run when he could explain it with a close-up. I remember when I watched TOS "Cosmos" I felt kind of dirty afterwards like I was on a date with a man, because of Carl's lips pursing that made me feel like he was trying to kiss me. That's why I can't stand Brian Cox shows - I mean talking about being in love with himself - YUCK!
    DeGrasse is not in love with himself. He's fat, unshaved guy and first episode was more like some little bit more ambitious BBC episode while I think in the 2nd one science really started to shine. DeGrasse is like a lovechild of Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan. With his blackness as a symbol of their hippy love toward humanity.
     
  2. Timewalker

    Timewalker Cat-lovin', Star Trekkin' Time Lady Premium Member

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    Carl Sagan wrote and hosted the original Cosmos. He did not direct any of it.
     
  3. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    That's what I figured -- that he was basically providing money, clout, and connections.


    As I keep saying, Braga has worked as a showrunner on multiple television series in the nine years since his involvement with Trek ended. Those series include two seasons of 24, one of the biggest hits FOX has ever had, and Terra Nova, which FOX only cancelled due to its cost rather than for quality or popularity reasons. So it really isn't surprising at all that FOX would have Braga on their list of showrunner candidates.
     
  4. Awesome Possum

    Awesome Possum Look up here, I’m in heaven Moderator

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    I just never expected him to go into documentary series since he's mainly known for fiction.

    Although given the special effects, he does have a lot of experience in dealing with that as a producer.
     
  5. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    And I never expected him to become a director. But few people like to do the same unvarying thing for their entire lives.
     
  6. Ancient Mariner

    Ancient Mariner Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Well that was fun! Perhaps a bit too heavy on the history-side of things for my tastes. But it was a good story, and well-told. I also enjoyed hearing about many of Halley's many other discoveries - beyond the timing of the comet that bears his name.
     
  7. Pondwater

    Pondwater Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Yeah. That and the whole Fish book disaster for Newton.
     
  8. Allyn Gibson

    Allyn Gibson Vice Admiral Admiral

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    I think large chunks of tonight's episode were drawn from Sagan and Druyan' s Comet. Which is very good, by the way.
     
  9. Christopher

    Christopher Writer Admiral

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    Well, that would explain it. I thought the focus was a little narrow for a Cosmos episode -- although a "narrow" focus on the foundations of modern astrophysics is not that narrow, admittedly.

    I wish, though, that we'd get an episode or two about scientists from somewhere other than Europe.

    It was nice to see a bit of live-action dramatization and more use of real-world settings like the coffee house, Cambridge, and the Champ de Mars. But I'm not fond of it when they do dialogue scenes in the animated sequences. Not only is the animation style not very expressive (so the "acting" is weak), but actually fictionalizing conversations when discussing real history in a documentary seems inappropriate.

    And I'm not sure that galactic collision three billion years from now would be as harmless to life as Tyson said. There'd be few star collisions, true, but galaxies are made up of gas and dust too, and the collisions of gas clouds would trigger massive bursts of star formation and supernovae, which would be hazardous to life. Dense gas or dust clouds engulfing star systems can also potentially be devastating to life on their planets.
     
  10. Coloratura

    Coloratura Snuggle Princess Premium Member

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    I loved learning about Edmond Halley tonight. I didn't know much about him, and this episode was very illuminating.
     
  11. Timewalker

    Timewalker Cat-lovin', Star Trekkin' Time Lady Premium Member

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    There's nothing wrong with learning the history behind the science. But they forgot the part where the Fourth Doctor had to climb up a tree and drop an apple on Newton's head so he could discover gravity. :p

    I hate the cartoons. But since nobody was around at the time to accurately record their conversations, all anyone can do is guess.
     
  12. tomalak301

    tomalak301 Admiral Premium Member

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    Cosmos was an amazing episode tonight, learning about Edmund Halley and his comet (Which I've been pronouncing wrong all these years). I do wonder when we will see another Comet. I remember in the 90s we had the Hale-bopp comet which brought on various cults and the like and it's always fascinating seeing how people react to cosmic events. Some take the science perspective, some are very religious about it, and some see it as the second coming, for example. We really do live in an interesting and diverse world.
     
  13. Awesome Possum

    Awesome Possum Look up here, I’m in heaven Moderator

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    That episode was actually beautiful.
     
  14. Coloratura

    Coloratura Snuggle Princess Premium Member

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    Of course it's pronounced "Hal-ley," and not "Hay-ley." Who would pronounce it like that? No one, that's who. Why are you asking? No one said anything. :shifty:

    Anyway, I also love how Neil made the point that we shouldn't laugh at people who saw the comets as portents of doom. How were they supposed to know? It's a nice way of curbing that collective sense of superiority we tend to get, at times, when we look back on the past. Of course, Hale-Bopp is different. When that whole tragedy occurred, we had a full understanding of comets and how they behaved.

    Indeed it was. I can't wait until my mom gets to watch it with me. We watched last week's this evening (my second viewing, her first), and she said that it made sense to her. She's very religious, but sees that evolution, and the Big Bang, make a lot of sense, and she accepts that. She also feels God set it all in motion, and I told her that's perfectly fine for her to feel that way. I'm an agnostic, but her believing God set it all in motion, well she's come a long way for someone who was once very fundamentalist in her faith, so I have no issue with her feeling that way. It harms nothing.
     
  15. Timewalker

    Timewalker Cat-lovin', Star Trekkin' Time Lady Premium Member

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    What tragedy? :confused:
     
  16. Coloratura

    Coloratura Snuggle Princess Premium Member

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    During the arrival of the Hale-Bopp comet, back in the late 1990s, 39 people killed themselves. It was a cult called Heaven's Gate, and they believed that the arrival of the comet foretold the arrival of an alien ship. They killed themselves on the word of Marshall Applewhite, the cult leader. It was famous for that, and for the fact that they all wore Nikes (the swoosh looked like a comet's tail).
     
  17. Timewalker

    Timewalker Cat-lovin', Star Trekkin' Time Lady Premium Member

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    That's... I don't have adequate words, since it's sad, awful, and ridiculous all at the same time. :(

    I was taking an astronomy course in college at the time when Hale-Bopp visited, and I remember being ecstatic when I spotted it for the first time. I regret that I won't live long enough to see Halley come around again, as I never did manage to see it clearly back in '86.
     
  18. Coloratura

    Coloratura Snuggle Princess Premium Member

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    Indeed it was sad. As for Halley's comet, I hope to see it next time it comes around. In 2061, I'll be 81 years old. Quite frankly, I'd like to see it a second, and maybe even a third time after that, too. :ouch:
     
  19. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    It must have been awesome to be here the time Earth passed thru Halley's tail.
     
  20. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    Same here. I try to help overly religious people understand by suggesting that the Big Bang was the moment of Creation, and evolution is simply God's way of doing things. There's no reason to divorce faith from science. But we must discourage letting dogma displace science.
     

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