Changing Language Usage

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous' started by Jim Gamma, Oct 4, 2012.

  1. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    My one year of linguistics courses bow to your MA.
     
  2. Admiral Buzzkill

    Admiral Buzzkill Fleet Admiral Admiral

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    The use of the past tense for "plead" - "pled" - has disappeared in favor of "pleaded."
     
  3. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^I think that's one that is context specific, though. I never thought of it before, but "I pleaded with him," sounds more correct to me than "I pled with him," while in the context of law, "He pled guilty," sounds more correct than "he pleaded guilty." What a strange and interesting language we have!
     
  4. Alidar Jarok

    Alidar Jarok Everything in moderation but moderation Moderator

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    Pleaded guilty is used often now, which I think is weird (pled still seems preferred). Although, in other legal contexts, pleaded is used more often. So, even in the law, context matters more than it should.
     
  5. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    Not in the UK so much, except in literature in the example tsq gave. One irregular verb that the US seems to have lost, at least in literature, is the past tense of to light. The number of times I've read lighted recently is, well, legion.
     
  6. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^Really? I've never heard 'lighted' in place of 'lit.'
     
  7. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    I read it all the time.

    One thing that happens occasionally in US English is the irregularisation of regular verbs. Dive is a good example. I see the pt 'dove' a lot, as though it's the same irregular group as strive. Of course the pp of dive/dove is not diven, so the analogy breaks down there.
     
  8. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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    ^Interesting. "Lighted" is definitely not common in American English, though, except in a couple specific phrases. I'd say "He was in a lighted room," not "He was in a lit room," but I've never heard anyone say, "He lighted a fire."
    Dove is definitely considered the past tense of dive, though.
     
  9. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    While I'm on the subject, I remember being infuriated when Honey, I Shrunk the Kids came out.
     
  10. thestrangequark

    thestrangequark Admiral Admiral

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  11. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    Irregular verbs are the bane of my existence.
     
  12. Shaytan

    Shaytan Vice Admiral Admiral

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    Fluctuat nec mergitur.
    I never bothered to learn them. I always pretended that my memory wasn't so good :lol:
     
  13. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    The strive group are my favourite.

    shrive, shrove, shriven

    it sounds so medieval.
     
  14. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    I usually pretend I learnt English from a drunken Ukrainian babushka. Which isn't too far from reality, actually.
     
  15. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    I wrote an Honours paper on swa sceal man do as an underlying theme in Beowulf. It got me a first. The best thing about it is that English hasn't actually changed in 1500 years.
     
  16. ITL

    ITL Vice Admiral Admiral

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    All of this analysis is giving me a nerdgasm. Thank you, peoples of this thread.
     
  17. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    I can give you a linguistic analysis of your sentence ITL. That's borderline geek.
     
  18. ITL

    ITL Vice Admiral Admiral

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    As long as it's not an F- I'll be happy.
     
  19. Deckerd

    Deckerd Fleet Arse Premium Member

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    Anyone can do it really[Norman]. One syllable[Greek] is usually[Norman] Old English (OE or Anglo Saxon). Other words can be guessed[Norman] at.
     
  20. scotpens

    scotpens Vice Admiral Admiral

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    That was a funny movie. The sequel, Honey, I Blew Up the Kid, stunk. I mean stank. Whatever.

    The past tense "learnt" is very British. Americans say "learned."

    But you knew that, right?
     
    Last edited: Oct 5, 2012