All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Enceladus)

Discussion in 'Science and Technology' started by Zulu Romeo, Feb 19, 2009.

  1. Zulu Romeo

    Zulu Romeo World Famous Starship Captain Admiral

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    NASA and ESA to attempt unmanned missions and perhaps landing there

    The romantic in me (as well as the "Man of Science" inside me working out a way to get out) has always been fascinated by having colonies set up on Europa and Enceladus one day, in the far future. Whether it's worth the cost of sending yet another robot creature into space to invade other worlds and search for signs of non-terrestrial life is always up for debate. Or maybe we should look towards getting our own asses to Mars first?
     
  2. flux_29

    flux_29 Commodore Commodore

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    Well if liquid water is found on one or both moons, it would be a big boost to finding life within the solar system, and outside it. This would be a HUGE discovery, even if the life on Europa and Enceladus is single-celled or bacteria.
     
  3. iguana_tonante

    iguana_tonante Admiral Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    Great news. I've been a supporter of a mission to Europa for a long time. If there is (as it seems possible) an ocean of water under the frozen surface, it would be a good idea to go and take a look.
     
  4. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    I approve of this message and wish to subscribe to the newsletter.
     
  5. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    Radiation is too great for humans at Europa.

    Or most of Jupiters moons
     
  6. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    Was anybody mentioning a human mission?
     
  7. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    "colonies set up on Europa and Enceladus" implied human missions to me.
     
  8. Lindley

    Lindley Moderator with a Soul Moderator

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    Eh, keeping radiation out is only one of the many problems with colonization. It hardly seems the most immediate.
     
  9. BolianAuthor

    BolianAuthor Writer, Battlestar Urantia Rear Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    This is very cool news.
     
  10. Forbin

    Forbin Admiral Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    Oops - missed that line.
     
  11. bryce

    bryce Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Re: All these worlds are yours... including Europa (and perhaps Encela

    The biggest worry with a probe to look for life under Europa's ice would be trying to prevent cross-contamination by Earth microbes that may hitch a ride of the probe - we just don't have a way yet to sterilize every single component with a 100% guarantee it will be absoulutly free of *anything* potentially living.

    (Preventing potential cross-contamination of the Jovian moons by Earth-life is a real concern for NASA - it's a major reason they decided to crash Galileo into Jupiter: http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2003/09/19/sunday/main574222.shtml )

    It's the same problem that has kept scientists from probing lake Vostok on Earth yet, even though - much like Europe - we really think there could be life in the water under the ice. ( http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/11/1115_041115_antarctic_lakes.html )

    We just don't have the technology yet to ensure that absolutely *nothing* from Earth isn't hitchhiking on a probe - life's just too damn tenacious, it just somehow always...finds a way.