3D Software?

Discussion in 'Fan Art' started by JoshC, Jan 26, 2004.

  1. dubeau

    dubeau Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2004
    Location:
    Canada, Quebec
    Update:
    3Dmax: Got around it. You have some limitations with modeling, but not has extensive then Cinema 4D. Figured out textures. The best site i found to learn 3DSmax was this one: http://www.mrbluesummers.com/

    I stopped using C4D, mainly because at how the software would corrupt a model when doing Boolean or trying to cut hole in a shape.

    After Effects is also a software where you can put overlay effects on movies, like water, snow, lighting and more...
     
  2. Today

    Today Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Feb 14, 2009
    There hasn't been an official announcement yet, but any 'wavers who haven't heard about it yet probably want to try googling "LightWave11.5":techman:

    Looks like modeler is finally getting some much needed attention, and the bullet dynamics and flocking tools are getting some pretty cool updates as well:mallory:
     
  3. Sumghai

    Sumghai Lieutenant Red Shirt

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    Jul 17, 2012
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    Christchurch, New Zealand
    Interesting thread - I came across this discussion whilst mulling over whether to post a question for you pros out there.

    I myself have only ever used parametric modelling CAD programs like SolidWorks, due to my engineering background, and I'm comfortable specifying exact dimension, extruding sketches and sticking in chamfers / fillets than the mere thought of tugging/deforming meshes.

    Up until this point, SW limited me to CADing up 25th Century versions of various Trek props and knick-knacks e.g. combadges and hypos.

    It seems to me, though, that the majority of modellers are geared towards stuff like 3DS / Blender - I guess it's something to do with meshes being much easier to deal with by renderers than the additional data that comes with parametric feature-based CAD?

    Amongst the things I'd like to do one day are:

    • Various canon and Star Trek Online ship classes and rendering various space scenes
    • An explorable Intrepid-class interior (sort of like what Lewis Niven is doing with the Ent-D in Source)
    However, I've found myself in a dilemma:

    • Should I make use of my existing SW skillset by doing all the modelling in SW, and then import the geometry into Max / Blender for the texturing, etc?
    • Or should I simply stop being a wuss and learn to work with meshes directly in Max / Blender like everybody else is doing?
     
  4. Gep Malakai

    Gep Malakai Vice Admiral Admiral

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2007
    CAD data imported into a polygon-based program requires extensive cleanup and/or rebuilding. The process that converts parametric data to a polygonal mesh is inexact, to say the least, and the resulting mesh usually unsuitable for professional work. Since you'd have to learn poly modeling to rebuild it anyway (or invest in decent retopologizing software, which still takes time to learn), you'd be better off just jumping in to modeling directly.
     
  5. The Librarian

    The Librarian Commodore Commodore

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    Feb 1, 2002
    I'm in a similar position to Sumghai, in that I'm most familiar with parametric modeling and have built a model I'm fairly happy with in FreeCad, but it's not really suitable for details like windows and doesn't do textures at all. I find Blender absolutely bewildering, though; it seems way too complicated for even fairly simple shapes.

    Are there any other (free) programs that are similar to parametric modelers where I can slap in some dimensions into a sketch and rotate/extrude it, then cut in details? Just as an example, in FreeCAD I could create an profile of a saucer section, then rotate it to create an object.
     
  6. Metryq

    Metryq Fleet Captain Fleet Captain

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    Jan 23, 2013
    A "lathe" operation is very basic and found in every 3D app I've ever used. You can create with a parametric CAD modeler, if you wish. Most have a function for exporting polygonal models for formats such as STL (for rapid prototyping). Some exporters are better than others. 3D forums or your own trial-and-error are the way to learn what works best for you.

    I would recommend learning the native modeling tools for whichever package you choose, as some of the native "entities" will give you flexibility that an imported polygonal model may not.

    Blender looked interesting to me the first time I saw it, but I didn't pick it up seriously until recently. The feature set is so good, I just couldn't brush it off anymore. Although the interface is improving, one really should learn the common key shortcuts. GUI controls are just so darned slow.

    There are so many Blender tutorials (books, web pages, wikis, videos, etc.) that it is hard to know where to begin. I've tried many books. Many will drag you through a detailed look at the interface until your eyes begin to glaze over. Even long-time 3D users want to jump into a new app and just use it. Learn by exploring. The following video tutorial lets you do just that—learn the navigation while exploring some advanced features:

    Ice Text Tutorial

    And a simple, yet not sleep-inducing, book is Blender 3D Basics.

    Also, Andrew Price's tutorials are excellent.
     
  7. TowerPower

    TowerPower Commander Red Shirt

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    Nov 22, 2006
    Does anyone know of a good starting tutorial for learning the basics of 3ds Max?
    I am a beginner and want to start learning.
    Thanks,
     
  8. TowerPower

    TowerPower Commander Red Shirt

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    Nov 22, 2006
    Wanted to say thanks to Donny for his advice. Have not heard from anyone else. Saw an article yesterday stating that Doug Drexler started out in Adobe Illustrator.
     
  9. Halmirdax

    Halmirdax Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Studio
    Thanks to all this discussion I'm downloading Blender. Sounds like there is a lot that can be done with it!
     
  10. Halmirdax

    Halmirdax Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Blender is not for the faint of heart. But I'm looking forward to the insane amount of time it's going to take to work out how to do anything, love at first sight.
     
  11. kennysmith

    kennysmith Lieutenant Commander Red Shirt

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    Jan 7, 2013
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    sacramento ca
    my question to you is this do you have a like or the full name of that web site or the program i can see if it can work for me?.
     
  12. B.J.

    B.J. Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Jul 14, 2004
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    ^Not quite sure what you're asking with that broken English, but there are several links in the third post of this thread. Some of those might be outdated, though.
     
  13. poserverse

    poserverse Ensign Newbie

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    Aug 25, 2013
    Location:
    Upstate Ny
    I noticed reading this thread that people have forgotten to mention Carrara and Hexagon (Both can be purchased at Daz3d. I have used these peices of software to make everythng from simple props to spaceships.
    If you are looking for a simple box modeling software I can recommend looking again at Daz3d and search Pegasus Modeler. It has the basics tools any beginner needs and then some.
     
  14. Tom Hendricks

    Tom Hendricks I like the Beats and the Shouting Premium Member

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    If you look a few threads down, there is a sticky thread all about Daz.
     
  15. martok2112

    martok2112 Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2013
    Hi, all,

    Late to the game here, but I thought I'd chime in with the tools of my hobby trade. :)

    This is how I roll:

    Blender-- I use this to construct the components for my ships. I have not learned how to texture in Blender yet. I build the ship completely in Blender, but I export the separate components for assembly in other programs I will speak of later. Blender, for me, was very easy to grasp on a basic level, thanks to a quick, 20 minute, basic interface tutorial by Karan Shah. I downloaded and kept that tutorial available for my first couple of go's at Blender, and within 5 days, built my first model....the classic battlestar, Galactica. (I've since improved on the model.) Program cost-- FREEEEEEEEE!!!!!! :) Thanks to some online tutorials, and to some books I've bought, my understanding of this increasingly powerful program is growing, slowly, but surely.

    Now, like I said, I hadn't learned how to texture in Blender yet. (I haven't even learned how to do unwraps). What I do is use a program called 3DEXCHANGE 5.4 PRO, from a company called "Reallusion". With this program, I can convert the .obj files into a format that is usable in another program, also made by Reallusion. 3DEXCHANGE is also great for creating persona animations (animation collections) for characters, as well. Program cost-- around $250 I think.

    Adobe PhotoShop. I have an old version of PhotoShop that I use to match the textures up to UV images from the models I assemble in the program listed below. Program cost-- A friend of mine gave me this copy, and I have guarded it like a watchdog ever since.) I wish I could afford the current version of PhotoShop which actually allows you to paint directly onto a 3D object. I've been thinking about subscribing to the Adobe Creative Cloud which would give me access to the current versions of PhotoShop and AfterEffects.

    That program is called iClone. I have the current version (5.5. PRO), but have been using iClone since version 4. iClone is not a modeling program. It is an animation program, but everything is already rendered, so exports of images and videos are very quick compared to higher end animation and modeling programs. This is the program I use to do final assembly and texturing (in conjunction with PhotoShop), and animation of my ships and sets. If I built the components large enough in Blender, by the time I bring the converted components over, they will simply fall into proper place when I drag the component to the center of the grid. Now, when I do texturing for my ships, it is a ping pong process between iClone and PhotoShop. (Program cost for iClone 5.5. PRO, I think it's around $299....but there are free versions you can try out.) iClone 5.5 PRO will also render in "toon" mode....which is not exactly cel-shading, but with the right tweaks, you can get some very cartoony looking imagery if that is your style. It can also do stereoscopic images in Anaglyph (red/cyan), Side by Side, Above/Below, and DualStream modes with adjustable convergence. There is a beta test version of a 64 bit version of iClone 5.5. PRO that I have found invaluable. Yes, it still crashes on me from time to time due to the detail of my work, and my imagination, but still, if it were not for iClone, I doubt I would've gotten even this far into venturing into 3D modeling/animation. iClone is pretty easy to use.'

    Ever since utilizing all this stuff, I have built tons of models from Star Trek, Star Wars, and Battlestar Galactica (mostly classic, but am planning on doing some new Galactica stuff soon), and even did a ship of my own design which I need to retexture a bit.
     
  16. TJ Sinclair

    TJ Sinclair Captain Captain

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    There and back again...
    What's a good program for making star charts (ie, maps of Federation space and such)? Every time I try and fiddle around with this kind of thing in Photoshop, the results are less than...stellar...
     
  17. B.J.

    B.J. Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

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    Jul 14, 2004
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    Huntsville, AL
    For a star chart, I'd go with a vector program like Inkscape or Illustrator. That way you can adjust the objects as much as you need, and also export a final image to whatever size you want.
     
  18. Triskelion

    Triskelion Rear Admiral Rear Admiral

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2008
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    To the Bat Tank!


    Adobe's Photoshop CS2 is available as freeware now.



    Enjoy gratis with Adobe's blessing!

    I'm not modeling, but thinking about book cover art. I was considering 3D modeling as a method for easier digital painting, like this stuff made with Daz 3D and Photoshop:

    Black Steel

    But after seeing these digital painting tutorials, I might stick with digital painting for now! He can accomplish a great deal of realism with just a few very simple techniques you can understand quickly. If you want to use Photoshop like a paint canvas - and create almost anything you can imagine - this is a great hands-on starting point.
     
  19. Ember

    Ember Lieutenant Junior Grade Red Shirt

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    Aug 31, 2015
    Location:
    The Netherlands, Earth
    I mostly use 3dsmax and Maya myself. It's and old post, but it seemed relevant to reply as it's stickied.

    I find 3dsmax easier and faster to model with, but Maya is better at animating.
     
  20. martok2112

    martok2112 Commodore Commodore

    Joined:
    Oct 8, 2013
    Hey, thanks for the info on that. :)
    Now if I can just get my new computer, or get my older ones back up to running as they should!

    BTW, update since my last post. I have learned to do much more on Blender. (When I do get my computers fixed, or get a new one, I'll have to do some brushing up on those new skillz.)

    Booleans, unwrapping, texturing, bones. My starship Enterprise refit really turned out nice. :) As did my Klingon K't'inga.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Booty shot!
    [​IMG]
    Components built and textured in Blender, assembled and rendered in iClone 5.5 PRO.
    to be continued...
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2015