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Old December 18 2008, 04:14 PM   #61
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

The way I see it is that in American English, "theatre" is the spelling you use when you're being pretentious and arty, and otherwise it's "theater."
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Old December 18 2008, 04:54 PM   #62
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Blizzard wrote: View Post
Funny thing, I've never been outside of the continential US.. And thus have learned firmly the American version English. However, I have never spelled theatre as "theater." The latter doesn't even look right to me.
That's because it ISN'T right. Even in America, the proper spelling for "theatre" -- at least live theatre -- is "-re."
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Old December 18 2008, 06:16 PM   #63
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Sci wrote: View Post
That's because it ISN'T right. Even in America, the proper spelling for "theatre" -- at least live theatre -- is "-re."
No, it isn't.

http://www.bartleby.com/61/54/T0145400.html
theater

SYLLABICATION: the·a·ter
...
VARIANT FORMS: or the·a·tre
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Old December 18 2008, 06:26 PM   #64
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Christopher wrote: View Post
Sci wrote: View Post
That's because it ISN'T right. Even in America, the proper spelling for "theatre" -- at least live theatre -- is "-re."
No, it isn't.

http://www.bartleby.com/61/54/T0145400.html
theater

SYLLABICATION: the·a·ter
...
VARIANT FORMS: or the·a·tre
Bartleby is wrong. Ask anyone involved in the American theatre, any University theatre program, or any reputable theatre, and they'll all tell you it's "-re." And a hell of a lot of us get driven batshit crazy by people spelling it "-er."
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Old December 18 2008, 06:34 PM   #65
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Sci wrote: View Post
Bartleby is wrong.
It's not Bartleby, it's the American Heritage Dictionary as transcribed by Bartleby. My print version of the AHD confirms it. So does every dictionary cited on Dictionary.com.

Ask anyone involved in the American theatre, any University theatre program, or any reputable theatre, and they'll all tell you it's "-re." And a hell of a lot of us get driven batshit crazy by people spelling it "-er."
Yes, within the theatrical subculture that spelling is preferred, but everywhere else, it's "theater." That's why it's called a variant. That means a form that is in common usage, but only among a minority of the population or within a particular specialized jargon or dialect.
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Old December 18 2008, 08:44 PM   #66
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

^ You mean in the US?
Cuz in Canada, I think its theatre whether its on stage, a movie theatre, an operating theatre...

Must be a British thing Canada retained and the US switched in some cases... even Firefox doesn't like the "re" in any usage...
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Old December 18 2008, 09:18 PM   #67
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

i really don't get cinemas being called 'theatres'. to me a theatre's where you go see Shakespeare or a panto or possibly a musical or opera. not a place to pony up six and a half quid for a ticket to the latest output of a Hollywood studio...
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Old December 18 2008, 10:38 PM   #68
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

captcalhoun wrote: View Post
i really don't get cinemas being called 'theatres'. to me a theatre's where you go see Shakespeare or a panto or possibly a musical or opera. not a place to pony up six and a half quid for a ticket to the latest output of a Hollywood studio...
Well, look at the etymology. It comes from the Greek word for "viewing," so it means "a place for watching." That applies to movies as well as live performances.
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Old December 19 2008, 01:10 AM   #69
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

captcalhoun wrote: View Post
i really don't get cinemas being called 'theatres'. to me a theatre's where you go see Shakespeare or a panto or possibly a musical or opera. not a place to pony up six and a half quid for a ticket to the latest output of a Hollywood studio...
I don't know why movie theatres exist period. I worked at one.
People pay 12$ to go to a movie they could watch at home for 5$.
They watch that movie with between 100-400 people, who may be loud, obnoxious, stupid or crowding you etc.
When you could be sitting on your couch...
Handicapped seating is abysmal, and you always have to throw the able-bodied people out of them for some reason.
They pay 20$ for 3$ worth of food.
They drive there in blizzards and have accidents (as do the staff having to get to work)- and its a dumb reason to risk your life!
They have to be open every single day, for some reason.

Books are better... stay home, and read books...
Preferably ones with British spelling...
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Old December 19 2008, 01:59 AM   #70
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

^ Movie theatres have seen a decline in butts-in-chair as the home studio continues to be perfected. That said, when I go it's usually to see a movie that I've a) been looking forward to and b) has a certain level of FX that makes the larger screen an advantage, as opposed to my TV or computer screen. I'd never go see a comedy or a drama at the theatres--like you said, why bother when I can get it far cheaper in a few months' time, and nothing is lost in the transition from big to small screen?

Fictitiously yours, Trent Roman
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Old December 19 2008, 02:10 AM   #71
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Me too, if I'm led to believe it "needs" the theatre screen... or unless my friends drag me... seriously, why on earth would we need to see Bolt in theatres? o.O
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Old December 19 2008, 03:38 AM   #72
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

But on the other there are movies like Lord of the Rings, or Star Wars, that really do need to be scene in the theater at least once.
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Old December 19 2008, 10:59 AM   #73
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Christopher wrote: View Post
Sci wrote: View Post
Bartleby is wrong.
It's not Bartleby, it's the American Heritage Dictionary as transcribed by Bartleby. My print version of the AHD confirms it. So does every dictionary cited on Dictionary.com.

Ask anyone involved in the American theatre, any University theatre program, or any reputable theatre, and they'll all tell you it's "-re." And a hell of a lot of us get driven batshit crazy by people spelling it "-er."
Yes, within the theatrical subculture that spelling is preferred, but everywhere else, it's "theater."
That's a bit like saying that if the person who makes a film calls it Star Trek but everyone else calls it Star Track then the second part is a valid spelling.

The theatre subculture is the one that ought to be regarded as being authoritative in its communal decision on how to spell the word when it comes to the live stage.
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Old December 19 2008, 02:53 PM   #74
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Sci wrote: View Post
That's a bit like saying that if the person who makes a film calls it Star Trek but everyone else calls it Star Track then the second part is a valid spelling.
No, it's nothing like that. A proper name such as a title has only one correct spelling -- for instance, the Richard Dean Anderson TV series is MacGyver, not MacGuyver as people constantly misinterpret it. In the same way that my name is spelled Bennett rather than Bennet. In a case like that, there is a single right answer. But that doesn't mean there aren't people out there named Bennet. And it doesn't have anything to do with variant spellings of a non-proper noun.

The theatre subculture is the one that ought to be regarded as being authoritative in its communal decision on how to spell the word when it comes to the live stage.
Well, who the hell said we were talking only about the live stage? I'm talking about the word "theater," which means:
1. A building, room, or outdoor structure for the presentation of plays, films, or other dramatic performances.
2. A room with tiers of seats used for lectures or demonstrations: an operating theater at a medical school.
3. a. Dramatic literature or its performance; drama: the theater of Shakespeare and Marlowe.
b. The milieu of actors and playwrights.
4. a. The quality or effectiveness of a theatrical production: good theater; awful theater.
b. Dramatic material or the use of such material: "His summation was a great piece of courtroom theater" (Ron Rosenbaum).
5. The audience assembled for a dramatic performance.
6. A place that is the setting for dramatic events.
7. A large geographic area in which military operations are coordinated: the European theater during World War II.
Your statement that the spelling "theatre" is preferred with reference to one specific usage of the word is not the least bit inconsistent with my point that "theatre" is a specialized variant of a word that is spelled "theater" in other contexts. So I don't understand why you're making a fuss over this. I also don't understand why you think this is something you need to try to debate with me. Not only am I not fundamentally disagreeing with you, but I'm just reporting what the dictionaries say. If you have a problem, take it up with Webster's, Merriam-Webster's, American Heritage, Random House, etc. Don't bust my chops over it.
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Old December 19 2008, 03:23 PM   #75
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Re: German expressions in recent Trek novels

Christopher wrote: View Post
Sci wrote: View Post
That's a bit like saying that if the person who makes a film calls it Star Trek but everyone else calls it Star Track then the second part is a valid spelling.
No, it's nothing like that. A proper name such as a title has only one correct spelling -- for instance, the Richard Dean Anderson TV series is MacGyver, not MacGuyver as people constantly misinterpret it. In the same way that my name is spelled Bennett rather than Bennet. In a case like that, there is a single right answer. But that doesn't mean there aren't people out there named Bennet. And it doesn't have anything to do with variant spellings of a non-proper noun.

The theatre subculture is the one that ought to be regarded as being authoritative in its communal decision on how to spell the word when it comes to the live stage.
Well, who the hell said we were talking only about the live stage?
I did.

Sci wrote: View Post
That's because it ISN'T right. Even in America, the proper spelling for "theatre" -- at least live theatre -- is "-re."
I'm talking about the word "theater," which means:
1. A building, room, or outdoor structure for the presentation of plays, films, or other dramatic performances.
2. A room with tiers of seats used for lectures or demonstrations: an operating theater at a medical school.
3. a. Dramatic literature or its performance; drama: the theater of Shakespeare and Marlowe.
b. The milieu of actors and playwrights.
4. a. The quality or effectiveness of a theatrical production: good theater; awful theater.
b. Dramatic material or the use of such material: "His summation was a great piece of courtroom theater" (Ron Rosenbaum).
5. The audience assembled for a dramatic performance.
6. A place that is the setting for dramatic events.
7. A large geographic area in which military operations are coordinated: the European theater during World War II.
Your statement that the spelling "theatre" is preferred with reference to one specific usage of the word is not the least bit inconsistent with my point that "theatre" is a specialized variant of a word that is spelled "theater" in other contexts. So I don't understand why you're making a fuss over this. I also don't understand why you think this is something you need to try to debate with me. Not only am I not fundamentally disagreeing with you, but I'm just reporting what the dictionaries say. If you have a problem, take it up with Webster's, Merriam-Webster's, American Heritage, Random House, etc. Don't bust my chops over it.
I would point to this exchange:

Christopher wrote: View Post
Sci wrote: View Post
That's because it ISN'T right. Even in America, the proper spelling for "theatre" -- at least live theatre -- is "-re."
No, it isn't.
I stated that the proper spelling of the word in reference to the live stage is "theatre." You attempted to argue that that is merely a variant of "theater;" by contradicting my claim that the proper spelling with regards to the live stage is "-re," that means you were claiming that "-er" is also a proper spelling with regards to the live stage.

It is not. The proper spelling of the word in regards to the live stage is "t-h-e-a-t-r-e." This is not a question of debate; no other spelling is valid with regards to the live stage.
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