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Old May 22 2014, 10:51 AM   #31
Asbo Zaprudder
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

Flashforward written by Robert J. Sawyer and published in 1999 predicted there would a Pope Benedict XVI in 2009, six years before Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger actually became Pope Benedict XVI in 2005. Perhaps Ratzinger had read the novel, which includes religious themes framed in a scientific context.
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Old May 22 2014, 12:26 PM   #32
T'Girl
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

Melakon wrote: View Post
In TOS: Balance of Terror, Angela Martine makes the sign of the cross while grieving at the ship's chapel.
She also kneels in prayer at her wedding, Keiko is wearing traditional Shinto dress at her wedding to Miles.

In one episode, Picard waxes philosophic about his belief in a afterlife, although not tied to any particular religion.



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Old May 22 2014, 02:55 PM   #33
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

I just remembered reading the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson -- which features a band of traveling Sufis among the Martian colonists.
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Old May 22 2014, 04:41 PM   #34
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

T'Girl wrote: View Post
Melakon wrote: View Post
In TOS: Balance of Terror, Angela Martine makes the sign of the cross while grieving at the ship's chapel.
She also kneels in prayer at her wedding, Keiko is wearing traditional Shinto dress at her wedding to Miles.

In one episode, Picard waxes philosophic about his belief in a afterlife, although not tied to any particular religion.
I was going to cite this. Also, in Firefly, Anarra seems to have some kind of meditation/Buddha thing going on at times in her quarters. In written fiction, there is the Warlock series by Christopher Stasheff, featuring the monks of St Vidicon, a technologically oriented branch of Catholicism. In the B5 episode Deconstruction of Falling Stars, there is an homage sequence to Miller's Canticle monks preserving technology. Arthur Clarke writes about a priest's struggles with scientific revelation in the fantastic story The Star. Heinlein wrote about theocracy in America in the novella If This Goes On..., and Star TrekS9 had the Bajorrans.
Point is, religion in science fiction has been tackled from various angles for a long time. And that doesn't even scratch the surface- try digging into Eric Flint's 1632 series and you'll find whole sections about religion, including the novel 1634: The Galileo Affair, which is practically totally devoted to religious debate.
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Old May 22 2014, 05:00 PM   #35
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

alpha_leonis wrote: View Post
Context of the question: my wife is actually an ordained Christian minister of a progressive denomination. But she laughed out loud watching Spock's funeral in TWOK, when Scotty started playing "Amazing Grace". Her comment: it's not like Spock should conceivably be a Christian. He's not even human.
He is half-human.

I would think finding intelligent life on other planets would be a drastic blow to most established religions on this planet (especially those who are of the Judao-Christian origin)
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Old May 22 2014, 05:16 PM   #36
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

Mistral wrote: View Post

... Star TrekS9 had the Bajorrans.
... try digging into Eric Flint's 1632 series and you'll find whole sections about religion, including the novel 1634: The Galileo Affair, which is practically totally devoted to religious debate.

I was aware of these, but left them off this thread deliberately. The Bajorans aren't human (therefore their religion falls into the "made-up" category.) And 1632 isn't set in the future. (I read about the first 6 or 8 novels in that series, but gave it up because the universe got too complex to keep track of, with all the multitude of contributing authors and story threads.)

Likewise David Weber's "Safehold" series features a made-up religion for a set of future humans who've been cut off from their original Earth history. Interesting read, but not exactly "on topic" for what I was looking for.
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Old May 22 2014, 05:35 PM   #37
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

MacLeod wrote: View Post
Kirks like from "Who Mourns for Adonais?" ; "Mankind has no need for gods. We find the one quite adequate."
TNG was even at times more abrasive towards people with religious beliefs. in, Who Watches the Watchers, Picard outright says that it's backward and primitive for cultures to worship a deity
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Old May 22 2014, 05:39 PM   #38
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

DarthTom wrote: View Post
TNG was even at times more abrasive towards people with religious beliefs. in, Who Watches the Watchers, Picard outright says that it's backward and primitive for cultures to worship a deity
Granted, though, this example was more personal for him. The "deity" in question was how Picard himself was seen by a primitive culture.

I also just remembered another reference from TNG's "Data's Day". In addition to the O'Briens' Shinto-style wedding, Data also makes a reference to the shipboard celebration of the Festival of Lights. This implies that there are practicing Hindus on board.
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Old May 22 2014, 05:48 PM   #39
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

alpha_leonis wrote: View Post
Granted, though, this example was more personal for him. The "deity" in question was how Picard himself was seen by a primitive culture.
What about the TNG episode where Ardra [sp?] returns to take her planet back and Picard and crew expose her powers as not one of a deity but rather technology.

There are many, many examples in Trek where the series outright insults people with religious beliefs using metaphors.

Here is another, Voyager episode where Janeway's father returns to take her to the afterlife only to find out it was an evil alien trying to kidnap her.

The only thing close to a "deity," on Trek are the Q. And they are portrayed as nothing more than evolved aliens who act like petulant children.

Last edited by DarthTom; May 22 2014 at 06:05 PM.
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Old May 22 2014, 06:57 PM   #40
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

alpha_leonis wrote: View Post

IIRC Gene Roddenberry specifically rejected a network request to include a Christian chaplain on the Enterprise during TOS, since it went against his ideas of a diverse crew base (including religious diversity.)
Roddenberry was a sworn atheist and fairly hostile to Christianity. He was occasionally forced by the network to include Christian references in TOS, however - such as the quote mentioned above in Who Mourns for Adonis and the reference to the Son of God in Bread and Circuses.

Shawnster wrote: View Post

In one if the newer Twilight Zones there is an episode that is set in the future and deals with the Starbof Bethlehem.http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_S..._Twilight_Zone)
I wonder if that was an adaptation of the Arthur C. Clarke classic (1956) "The Star" which tells of an astrophysicist and Jesuit priest who is part of a crew on an exploration mission to a remote star system - which Mistral mentions above.

Another example - Book in Firefly is a practicing Christian minister or monk. He is shown reading the Bible on more than one occasion, spends time at a monastery, is referred to as "Shepherd" Book, a pretty plain reference to some sort of ordained or lay preacher, and gets into an argument with River about fixing the scientific inaccuracies in the Bible. Likewise, Mal is portrayed as a former Christian (he kisses a cross before diving into battle in the pilot episode) who has fallen from the faith.
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Old May 22 2014, 08:44 PM   #41
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

^Well...

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Old May 22 2014, 08:52 PM   #42
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

FreezeC77 wrote: View Post
I would think finding intelligent life on other planets would be a drastic blow to most established religions on this planet (especially those who are of the Judao-Christian origin)
I wouldn't think so. I've read nothing anywhere in the Bible that denies the existence of alien life. If I ever met such life, I'd view it as yet another part of God's creation.

Lapis Exilis wrote: View Post
Shawnster wrote: View Post

In one if the newer Twilight Zones there is an episode that is set in the future and deals with the Starbof Bethlehem.http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_S...Twilight_Zone))
I wonder if that was an adaptation of the Arthur C. Clarke classic (1956) "The Star" which tells of an astrophysicist and Jesuit priest who is part of a crew on an exploration mission to a remote star system
Yep, that's the one.
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Last edited by Mr. Laser Beam; May 22 2014 at 09:02 PM.
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Old May 22 2014, 10:10 PM   #43
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

Nerys Myk wrote: View Post
Philip Jose Farmer wrote a series of short stories featuring a character called Father Carmody, who is Catholic.
Then there's Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock, about a Jewish man who travels back in time to find Jesus.
The Riverworld series, of course, showed all of humanity being resurrected. One of the early stories featured a thinly-disguised Jesus. He was more than a little dismayed at winding up in a totally different afterlife than expected.

Melakon wrote: View Post
In TOS: Balance of Terror, Angela Martine makes the sign of the cross while grieving at the ship's chapel.
And, of course, the fact that they had a chapel at all.

JoeZhang wrote: View Post
The Seafort saga is about a Christian theocracy and I think also features Muslim characters (been a while since I read them).
The Mote in God's Eye had a Muslim character.

Mistral wrote: View Post
In written fiction, there is the Warlock series by Christopher Stasheff, featuring the monks of St Vidicon, a technologically oriented branch of Catholicism.
Aw, you beat me to it. "St. Vidicon of Cathode, pray for us!"
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Old May 22 2014, 10:33 PM   #44
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

Vendikarr wrote: View Post
Well Judaism is one of the oldest religions still in practice today, and it's traditions haven't changed much in millennia. If you want to depict a terran religion in the future, Judaism may be a good choice.
They don't stone people as much as they used to. Also, some carry keys in their pocket on Saturday, others do not. Hell, some eat pork while others do not. Judaism has as many branches as any other religion.

Regarding Amazing Grace, since it's a unitarian hymn, it's designed to be pretty welcoming to anyone who wants to sing it.
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Old May 23 2014, 03:39 AM   #45
Nerys Myk
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Re: Real-world religions on futuristic sci-fi

Silvercrest wrote: View Post
Nerys Myk wrote: View Post
Philip Jose Farmer wrote a series of short stories featuring a character called Father Carmody, who is Catholic.
Then there's Behold the Man by Michael Moorcock, about a Jewish man who travels back in time to find Jesus.
The Riverworld series, of course, showed all of humanity being resurrected. One of the early stories featured a thinly-disguised Jesus. He was more than a little dismayed at winding up in a totally different afterlife than expected.
Yeah, Riverworld mentions Jesus a few times. Apparently Jesus looks like Tom Mix.
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