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Old December 26 2013, 12:04 PM   #1
Nathan
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Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

I know this is Off-Topic, but I was hoping someone could answer. I just got Game of Thrones -- Book One. On the cover it says, "Movie Tie-In Edition" and has a pic of Ned Stark on the front. I know it is different from the other older books.

My question is the Movie Tie Edition different from the Original Book in terms of the text. I figure it would be the same since the book came out first, but I'm getting hung-up on the "Movie Tie-In Edition."

I think it would be the same, as for instance, say Christopher Bennett's book Star Trek DTI was turned into a movie, I doubt it would be marketed as "Read CLB's Book....now watch CLB's Book turned into movie, and then it would be "Read CLB's book based on the movie!" I assume the movie tie-in books would be the same as the original in content, but the cover may be different.

Yep, I know Google can be your friend, but I couldn't find anyting if Game of Thrones Movie Tie In book is the same as the original book (except for the cover of course)

Thanks for any input.

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Old December 26 2013, 12:23 PM   #2
Relayer1
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

I'm reading the novels at the moment. I don't have the 'tie-in' versions, but I can't imagine the author rewriting them. He's involved in the TV show and although I've only seen season one, it does stick very close to the book anyway.

Very close...
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Old December 26 2013, 12:29 PM   #3
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Relayer1 wrote: View Post
I'm reading the novels at the moment. I don't have the 'tie-in' versions, but I can't imagine the author rewriting them. He's involved in the TV show and although I've only seen season one, it does stick very close to the book anyway.

Very close...
The first season was pretty close, but as its gone on hes drifted further and further from the books.
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Old December 26 2013, 01:04 PM   #4
Christopher
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Generally tie-in editions are just the original book with a photo/poster from the movie or show used as the cover art, in order to promote the book to the movie/show's audience.
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Old December 26 2013, 03:07 PM   #5
Therin of Andor
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Christopher wrote: View Post
Generally tie-in editions are just the original book with a photo/poster from the movie or show used as the cover art, in order to promote the book to the movie/show's audience.
Yep. I know I saw a James Bond movie tie-in once ("The Spy Who Loved Me") that was a wholly new novelization by Christopher Wood. Obviously it varied enough from the Ian Fleming novel to warrant a new version. He also wrote "James Bond and Moonraker", a variation on the original.

There's also been a SF fantasy movie that has had two different novelizations of the same movie. Can't recall which movie series, though.
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Last edited by Therin of Andor; December 26 2013 at 11:56 PM. Reason: typo
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Old December 26 2013, 03:57 PM   #6
Greg Cox
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

In general, a "movie tie-in edition" is simply a new printing of the original book with a new cover using art from the movie. For example, when the most recent version of I AM LEGEND came out, Tor simply reprinted Richard Matheson's original novel and slapped the movie poster on the cover. There were no changes to the text. Ditto for the movie tie-in editions of WHAT DREAMS MAY COME, STIR OF ECHOES, and THE MOTHMAN PROPHECIES by John Keel. (All of which I handled for Tor.)

Now, as mentioned, occasionally someone will put out a novelization of movie based on an earlier novel, as with that Bond movie or, infamously, Bram Stoker's Dracula by Fred Saberhagen. But that's a different thing. You can tell the difference by looking at the credits. If it says something like "A novel by Greg Cox based on the screenplay by Joe Blow based a novel by Charles Dickens," you're dealing with a book based on a movie based on a book.

But if it just says "by George R.R. Martin," it's simply the old book with a new cover.

Hope this makes sense!

Elaborating on the topic: Sometimes, of course, a movie is based on a short story, not a novel, which presents certain challenges. In cases like REAL STEEL or THE BOX, which were each based on short stories by Matheson, I would put together a new short-story collection, The Box and Other Stories or whatever, and slap the movie poster on the cover to create a new "movie tie-in" collection of Matheson stories.

I did the same thing with REAL STEEL . . . .
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Last edited by Greg Cox; December 26 2013 at 04:29 PM.
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Old December 26 2013, 07:26 PM   #7
Relayer1
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Therin of Andor wrote: View Post
Christopher wrote: View Post
Generally tie-in editions are just the original book with a photo/poster from the movie or show used as the cover art, in order to promote the book to the movie/show's audience.
Yep. I know I saw a James Bond movie tie-in once ("The Spy Who Loved Me") that was a wholly new novelization by Christopher Wood. Obviously it varied enough from the Ian Fleming novel to warrant a new version. He also wrote "James Bond and Moonraker", a variation on the original.

There's also been a SF fantasy movie that has had two different novelizations of the same movie. Can't recall with movie series, though.
Shaun Hutson and Randall Frakes both did different novelizations of The Terminator.

Anyone know why ?
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Old December 26 2013, 08:00 PM   #8
Christopher
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Therin of Andor wrote: View Post
Yep. I know I saw a James Bond movie tie-in once ("The Spy Who Loved Me") that was a wholly new novelization by Christopher Wood. Obviously it varied enough from the Ian Fleming novel to warrant a new version. He also wrote "James Bond and Moonraker", a variation on the original.
Well, most of the Bond movies from the '70s onward just took the titles of Fleming novels and created completely new stories for them.

Relayer1 wrote: View Post
Shaun Hutson and Randall Frakes both did different novelizations of The Terminator.

Anyone know why ?
Maybe regular and young-adult versions? I know one or two Trek movies had both.
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Old December 26 2013, 09:14 PM   #9
Greg Cox
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Yeah, it's not uncommon these days for there to be an adult novelization and a "junior novelization." It's also conceivable that there could be an American edition and a British edition, published by different companies for different territories, using different writers . . . although I've never known that to happen.

Where it really gets tricky sometimes is when the movie changes the title. In olden days, this wasn't so much of a problem. You just put the movie logo in big type on the cover and the original book title in smaller type. But nowadays you really want to use the movie title so that search engines can find the book when people are shopping on-line, so there's going to be more pressure to change the title of the book to match the movie . . . at least on the tie-in edition.

In some cases, the movie title definitely wins out over time. Nobody remembers Somewhere in Time as Bid Time Return anymore, even though that was the original title of Matheson's novel. And I'll cop to using the movie title on every edition Tor has ever published . . . with Richard's permission, of course.
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Old December 26 2013, 09:40 PM   #10
ronny
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Greg Cox wrote: View Post
If it says something like "A novel by Greg Cox based on the screenplay by Joe Blow based a novel by Charles Dickens," you're dealing with a book based on a movie based on a book.
Kind of a sneaky way to tell us about your next book. I can't wait to see it!!!
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Old December 26 2013, 09:43 PM   #11
Greg Cox
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

ronny wrote: View Post
Greg Cox wrote: View Post
If it says something like "A novel by Greg Cox based on the screenplay by Joe Blow based a novel by Charles Dickens," you're dealing with a book based on a movie based on a book.
Kind of a sneaky way to tell us about your next book. I can't wait to see it!!!
I'm blowing the lid off Great Expectations!
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Old December 26 2013, 11:31 PM   #12
Relayer1
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Greg Cox wrote: View Post
Yeah, it's not uncommon these days for there to be an adult novelization and a "junior novelization." It's also conceivable that there could be an American edition and a British edition, published by different companies for different territories, using different writers . . . although I've never known that to happen.
With the Terminator novels, they're both 'adult'. Hutson is British (I think) so it could be a territorial thing.

Seems a waste of effort though, two authors writing the same book...
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Old December 27 2013, 12:01 AM   #13
Therin of Andor
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Relayer1 wrote: View Post
Shaun Hutson and Randall Frakes both did different novelizations of The Terminator.

Anyone know why ?
That's the title I was thinking of.

http://www.goingfaster.com/term2029/misctermdata.html

Fascinating comparison of the two. Plus it continues, "The Huston novel was not marketed in the US. It is a Star Book, published in 1984 by the Paperback Division of W. H. Allen and Co. PLC, of 44 Hill Street, London, W1X 8LB. The book itself was printed and bound in Australia by The Dominion Press - Hedges and Bell, Victoria."
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Old December 27 2013, 12:01 AM   #14
Greg Cox
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Relayer1 wrote: View Post
Greg Cox wrote: View Post
Yeah, it's not uncommon these days for there to be an adult novelization and a "junior novelization." It's also conceivable that there could be an American edition and a British edition, published by different companies for different territories, using different writers . . . although I've never known that to happen.
With the Terminator novels, they're both 'adult'. Hutson is British (I think) so it could be a territorial thing.

Seems a waste of effort though, two authors writing the same book...
I agree. I can imagine scenarios where it could happen, though. In general, the publisher pays the writer, not the movie studio, so I don't think a British publisher could just "borrow" the manuscript the American publisher paid for (or vise versa), even though the copyright would belong to the studio of course. It certainly seems like it would be easier for Publisher A to pay Publisher B for the right to use the same manuscript, but if they couldn't come to terms . . . it could conceivably be cheaper just to hire a local writer to re-novelize the script.

Again, this is just hypothetical. I've been in this business for years and I've never personally dealt with such a scenario.

(Although I know of at least one instance where two separate novelizations were written of the same movie, but neither ever saw print!)
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Old December 27 2013, 12:32 AM   #15
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Re: Off Topic: Movie Tie-In Editions

Never mind, beaten to it.
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