RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 139,568
Posts: 5,423,257
Members: 24,809
Currently online: 503
Newest member: Dobian

TrekToday headlines

Star Trek: Alien Domain Game Announced
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Red Shirt Diaries Episode Three
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Made Out Of Mudd Photonovel
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Takei Has Growth Removed
By: T'Bonz on Sep 15

Retro Review: Tears of the Prophets
By: Michelle on Sep 12

New Wizkids Attack Wing Ships
By: T'Bonz on Sep 12

Coto Drama Sold To Fox
By: T'Bonz on Sep 12

Braga Inks Deal
By: T'Bonz on Sep 12

Remastered Original Series Re-release
By: T'Bonz on Sep 11

UK Trek Ships Calendar Debuts
By: T'Bonz on Sep 10


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Misc. Star Trek > Trek Tech

Trek Tech Pass me the quantum flux regulator, will you?

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old October 28 2013, 04:51 PM   #1
Mark_Nguyen
Commodore
 
Mark_Nguyen's Avatar
 
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Scrapping Old Starships

In recent news, the US Navy's first supercarrier, USS Forrestal, has been sold for scrap metal for the handsome sum of $0.01...

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/10/24...d-for-1-penny/

Here's some discussion around just HOW such large ships are being scrapped. Point being, no one has ever scrapped so large a ship - it takes forever, and it's really tough to do:

http://www.airliners.net/aviation-fo...d.main/156294/

This makes me wonder how starships are scrapped in Trek. We know that this is probably done, given possible-future Admiral Riker's remarks that Starfleet wanted to scrap the Enterprise-D before he got them to assign her as his personal flagship (after only 33 years? - but that's a whole other thread). Following today's parallels, a ship would first be stripped of all components that can be re-used in other starships (typically those of her class still functioning, but then also any ship that can use those components), weapons systems, computers, engines, and anything classified. Then the ship would be scrapped and recycled into raw materials for new ships, assuming no one wanted the hull as a museum or to be used as target practice, etc.

Obviously there is a practical limit to this though, and there may be a skeleton of a starship left over, stripped to the point where it's simply easier to create new components than to take the hull apart and forge new alloys from them (this is assuming they aren't using replicators or matter converters, which is a safe bet for the most part). So what happens then? Do we simply send the rest into the local sun?

Mark
__________________
Mark Nguyen - Producer
The 404s - Improv Comedy Group

Oh, I like that Trek thing too...
Mark_Nguyen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 28 2013, 06:50 PM   #2
Unicron
Continuity Spackle
 
Unicron's Avatar
 
Location: Cybertron
Send a message via ICQ to Unicron
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Scrapped ships are pretty common in the FASAverse, and this seems to be the fate of more than a few Constitution/Enterprise type heavy cruisers. I would suppose some vessels also wound up being scrapped after wartime service and taking too much damage to make repairs practical.
__________________

"My dream is to eat candy and poop emeralds. I'm halfway successful."


Catbert, Evil Director of Human Resources
Unicron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 28 2013, 08:13 PM   #3
T'Girl
Vice Admiral
 
T'Girl's Avatar
 
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Mark_Nguyen wrote: View Post
Do we simply send the rest into the local sun?
Seems wasteful, majority of the materials could/should be repurposed following the starship's disassembly.

Would make more sense to re-employ say the hull metals, as opposed to expending the energy to replicate what you already have.

T'Girl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 28 2013, 08:18 PM   #4
Mirror,Mirror
Ensign
 
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Scrapping would seem rather easy at large yards. With industrial sized replicators you could dematerialize large chunks and store the energy. Rare components and such could be stored, but much of the ship could simply be transfigured in to energy.
Mirror,Mirror is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 28 2013, 08:21 PM   #5
Relayer1
Commodore
 
Relayer1's Avatar
 
Location: The Black Country, England
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Given that the volume of explored space increases exponentially with every lightyear traveled outwards, the need for more and more ships to service that space is inevitable.

Whilst a ship may be too outdated for frontline service, unless severely damaged it would be unlikely to be scrapped but given run of the mill assignments - patrol, supply, passenger service or simply given over to civilian use.

I wouldn't be surprised to see ships well over 100 years old in regular use.
__________________
Soon oh soon the light, Pass within and soothe this endless night, And wait here for you, Our reason to be here...
Relayer1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 28 2013, 09:04 PM   #6
Nob Akimoto
Captain
 
Location: The People's Republic of Austin
View Nob Akimoto's Twitter Profile
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Given that resource scarcity isn't a big deal for the Federation outside of a handful of materials, if a ship's to the point where it needs to be scrapped, they're probably pretty efficient about doing so, and might do stuff like expend it in live fire exercises and the like after stripping out the useful bits.
Nob Akimoto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 29 2013, 12:33 AM   #7
Mirror,Mirror
Ensign
 
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Well we know some really old ships are still either in service or were rushed back into it as a constitution class took part in wolf 359. We also know excelsior were still common ships during the dominion war. From some TNG we know some old ships, constellations were phased out, some used as target ships and we know the federation had floating "scarp yards". Which may have been more of a mothball thing.
Mirror,Mirror is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 29 2013, 06:24 PM   #8
CharlieZardoz
Lieutenant
 
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Phaser on level 16!
CharlieZardoz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 30 2013, 04:45 AM   #9
Lyon_Wonder
Commander
 
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

The Enterprise D's saucer section that crash landed on Veridian III in "Generations" was likely scrapped since I assume it wasn't worthwhile for Starfleet to repair it.
Lyon_Wonder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 30 2013, 11:45 AM   #10
Robert Comsol
Commodore
 
Robert Comsol's Avatar
 
Location: USS Berlin
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

How "expensive" is a baryon particle sweep? TNG's "Starship Mine" suggested that prolonged velocities at higher warp speeds build up harmful radiation residue that somehow needed to be neutralized.

It's inconclusive at what time in-universe this problem was acknowledged and how they dealt with it in the 23rd Century. I believe they did not have baryon sweep technology in the 23rd Century and simply sent the hulls for cremation into the nearest star or sun (too bad the ex-Soviet Navy couldn't do that with their nuclear submarines).

Contamination might be an issue to consider.

Bob
__________________
"The first duty of every Starfleet officer is to the truth" Jean-Luc Picard
"We can't solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them."
Albert Einstein
Robert Comsol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 2 2013, 03:09 AM   #11
Praetor
Vice Admiral
 
Praetor's Avatar
 
Location: The fine line between continuity and fanwank.
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

That's a great point, Bob. It's possible it existed all along, or it's possible it was invented at some point between TOS and TNG, allowing all those medium-old Mirandas to retain in service.
__________________
"If you can't take a little bloody nose, maybe you ought to go back home and crawl under your bed. It's not safe out here. It's wondrous, with treasures to satiate desires both subtle and gross; but it's not for the timid." - Q
Praetor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 2 2013, 09:38 AM   #12
Nob Akimoto
Captain
 
Location: The People's Republic of Austin
View Nob Akimoto's Twitter Profile
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Whoever used the term "baryon particles" as something to be removed from a ship should permanently have their sci-fi writing privileges taken away. "Starship Mine", even if it was an okay episode, has such an absurdly horrible bit of science in it that puts it on nigh "Threshold" level of badness.

Perhaps by the 24th century 'baryon particle' actually refers to exotic NON-baryonic matter.
Nob Akimoto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 4 2013, 06:15 PM   #13
zDarby
Lieutenant
 
Location: NorCal
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

I'm with you on that one, Nob. Fortunately, there's a linguistic out.

I don't remember the episode stating what they were using to do the sweep with, so it could be they were sweeping for baryons ...specific ones ...specific molecular collections of them. My point being that English has several idiums that no longer make sense in today's context but still have the old meaning. (I'm suddenly blanking on examples. I had three when I started writing.) "Baryonic sweep" could easily be a 24th century example.

In the 24th century, I would guess the ship would go through a barionic sweep to get rid of any dangerous particles, trim trilithium to core coolant. (Remember what happened to the Borg when they got exposed?) This would make the vessel completely inert and ready for storage, if that were her fate. Any useful systems could then be identified by engineering teams, disconnected and beamed off the ship. If she were to be scrapped, large chunks would then be carefully cut off her and pushed through an industrial replicator that would take the individual molecular components and separate them into large blocks of that material to be used again.

In the 23rd century, when I assume they did not have baryonic sweeps or replicators of that sophistication, a phaser set to vaporize might be the best answer: any dangerous compound would be turned into it's constituent elements, making it inert. One should easily be able to extract much of the energy used by exposing the resultant plasma to an electromagnetic field of the right shape. And then the individual elements could be separated via another set of mag fields. Easy!
zDarby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 4 2013, 07:17 PM   #14
Metryq
Captain
 
Metryq's Avatar
 
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

zDarby wrote: View Post
English has several idiums that no longer make sense in today's context but still have the old meaning.
Some idioms made no sense originally and are still used today, such as "the alarm went off," when actually it sounded (went on).

Other idioms that are technically incorrect include "see the light" and dietary programs being referred to as "weight loss" rather than "mass loss" or even "waist management."

(I suppose "see the light" might be debated; we don't actually see objects. We see by the light they reflect or emit, but do we really see light? A high school physics teacher's favorite peeve was "seeing steam.")
__________________
"No, I better not look. I just might be in there."
—Foghorn Leghorn, Little Boy Boo
Metryq is offline   Reply With Quote
Old November 4 2013, 09:59 PM   #15
Chemahkuu
Vice Admiral
 
Chemahkuu's Avatar
 
Location: United Kingdom
Send a message via Yahoo to Chemahkuu
Re: Scrapping Old Starships

Nob Akimoto wrote: View Post
Whoever used the term "baryon particles" as something to be removed from a ship should permanently have their sci-fi writing privileges taken away. "Starship Mine", even if it was an okay episode, has such an absurdly horrible bit of science in it that puts it on nigh "Threshold" level of badness.

Perhaps by the 24th century 'baryon particle' actually refers to exotic NON-baryonic matter.
Or an exotic particle field that eliminated anything that *wasn't* bayronic from the structure held inside it.
__________________
"But there's no sense crying over every mistake. You just keep on trying till you run out of cake."
Chemahkuu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:51 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.