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Star Trek - Original Series The one that started it all...

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Old August 2 2013, 06:49 AM   #31
ZapBrannigan
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

Noname Given wrote: View Post
I also got into computers because of Star trek (not in the way you might think). In 1975, I found out my Jr. high school had a teletype hooked into an HP2000 mainframe via 110 baud acoustic modem; and one of the things you could do on it was play a 'Star Trek' simulation - and I was hooked

I remember that game. I was in junior high, but since I was a huge ST fan, my sister and her boyfriend invited me over to the high school to play it. The school had a Decwriter:




The only keyboard I had ever used before that day was my parents' manual (non-electric) typewriter, about 30 lbs of iron and a lot of work to operate:





So on the Decwriter they immediately had to tell me not to bang the keys so hard ("Don't kill it!").

The game as I recall was based on the Romulan attack scene in "The Deadly Years." You entered your name and became "Captain (name)", and then the machine would describe some Romulan action and say "What are your orders?" It was a novelty, but even at the time it wasn't that bitchin'. It got a little repetitive.

Last edited by ZapBrannigan; August 2 2013 at 07:00 AM.
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Old August 2 2013, 08:02 AM   #32
Noname Given
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

ZapBrannigan wrote: View Post
Noname Given wrote: View Post
I also got into computers because of Star trek (not in the way you might think). In 1975, I found out my Jr. high school had a teletype hooked into an HP2000 mainframe via 110 baud acoustic modem; and one of the things you could do on it was play a 'Star Trek' simulation - and I was hooked

I remember that game. I was in junior high, but since I was a huge ST fan, my sister and her boyfriend invited me over to the high school to play it. The school had a Decwriter:




The only keyboard I had ever used before that day was my parents' manual (non-electric) typewriter, about 30 lbs of iron and a lot of work to operate:





So on the Decwriter they immediately had to tell me not to bang the keys so hard ("Don't kill it!").

The game as I recall was based on the Romulan attack scene in "The Deadly Years." You entered your name and became "Captain (name)", and then the machine would describe some Romulan action and say "What are your orders?" It was a novelty, but even at the time it wasn't that bitchin'. It got a little repetitive.
As to the game, nope - you commanded the 1701 - and searched an 8X8 grid (64 Quadrants) for Klingon battle cruisers to fight/repel.

A long range scan gave you a look at the quadrants nextr to your current quadrant and printed out like this:

Code:
 
===========
003|101|213
-----------
000|002|213  
-----------
000|201|100
===========
With:
The hundreds digit showing the number of Klingons
The tens digit showing the number of Starbases (Where you can dock/repair.)
The ones digit showing the number of Stars (blocked photon torpedoes)

Code:
 
---------------
. . . . . . . .
. . . E . . . .
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . * . .
. . . . . . K .
. . . . . . . .
. . K . . . . .
. . . . . B . .
---------------
E= 1701 USS Enterprise
*= Star
K = Klingon
B = Starbase

You entered commands like fire phasers (which auto-locked on - and then you had to decide how much energy to fire); or photons (and which point you had to enter a vector (1-360 degrees) setting the path along which the torp would travel. If it hit a K (Klingon) it destroyed him instantly. Phasers drew from your Energy total (as did moving at warp or Impulse - and if you got to zero energy you were dead in space, or if an enemy disruptor took you below zero energy, you blew up (IE game over). You had a stock of 10 photons too; and docking (maneuvering next to a Starbase - replenish both you energy and photon totals to max.

A couple of the things I added were:
-----------------------------------
- a chance for a Romulan to randomly decloak and fire in any quadrant you were in on occasion.

- I separated a shield rating out from the energy total - and any enemy hit over that rating took a main system offline (Warp Drive, Photons, Phasers, etc.) - and you replenished shields at your discretion (max of 250) - and it subtracted the rating from your overall energy each turn. Damaged systems were auto-repaired when you docked at a Starbase.

My local version of the game became pretty popular while I was attending the school. I don't know if they kept it stored/available after I graduated; and I kept a printout and paper tape reader copy of the code so it could be reloaded from scratch if needed.
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Old August 2 2013, 01:00 PM   #33
Mr. Hengist
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

plynch wrote: View Post
Never in my life had I thought of vagina dentate and the salt vampire. Its mouth looks like it, though. Is that your own thought or are there others who have said they think/see that?

Giving that one some thought. And looking for a screen cap of the other, just for curiosity.
I don't remember seeing it anywhere else, it's just something that occurred to me as I was mulling over some of this stuff in retrospect.

Maybe it wasn't written that way on a very conscious level, but the salt creature is actually analogous to the idea of a succubus. For obvious reasons in-episode references to anything sexual were very very indirect. But they were definitely there if you want to look for them.

For example, the salt creature is living on the planet alone with that surviving male scientist (whose wife the salt creature killed) for years before the Enterprise visits. I believe there's dialog that says the salt creature fulfills his "needs." (In exchange for the salt tablets I guess?)

The salt creature replaced the scientist's wife. The salt creature looks into people's minds and creates their "fantasy." It's always highly sexualized even when the salt creature did to to Uhura, instead of a sexy fantasy woman, it became a studly male crewman.

When Chekov sees it, it's another sexy image of a woman that Chekov knew, and I think they even play "sexy" music in the score.

So, that's what a succubus is, except succubi are supernatural, but psychologically it's the same thing. The succubus comes at nighttime, has sex with their victim, and basically sucks out the victim's life force.

Now the way it's explicitly depicted when the salt creature attacks it creates great pain but why wouldn't the salt creature be able to delude the victim into thinking they were having sex with the fantasy person? Obviously on T.V. they can't show the salt creature giving its victims orgasms while sucking the life out of them. So it can't be a perfect parallel.

If you remember the Tobe Hooper movie "Life Force" from the 1980's (which also had Patrick Stewart in his pre-TNG days playing a supporting role), based on a Colin Wilson novel, it's about "space vampires" that come to earth, in the form of very physically attractive humanoids. Their real form is like a gian bat like creature though. When they get physically close to a human they suck the "life force" out of the human which is depicted as electrical sparks.

It's pretty much the same idea.
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Old August 2 2013, 02:13 PM   #34
Mr. Adventure
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

I have a version of that text based game on my iPhone. Never played it on a teletype but played a lot of it on my Commodore 64.
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Old August 2 2013, 02:19 PM   #35
CaptainDave1701
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

Those were indeed the days and I miss them dearly.
I remember all of the models, fanzines and conventions. Making Tribbles out of fake fur and uniform tunics out of sweatshirts. I still kick myself to this day for not shelling out $100.00 back in the 70's to buy a Phaser off of Bill Hickey.

That being said I am glad that we have the days we have. All of the old models are available along with the 1:350 Enterprise which can be totaly tricked out. Tribbles are abundant for sale on the net are they come with sound and motion. You can also buy nice Phasers, Communicators and Tricorders all with lights and sound for a reasonable price as back in the day they were very expensive. Quality uniforms, props and blue ray remastered versions of the show are available.
So....in many ways these are the days.
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Old August 2 2013, 02:36 PM   #36
TREK_GOD_1
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

Mr. Hengist wrote: View Post
When Chekov sees it, it's another sexy image of a woman that Chekov knew, and I think they even play "sexy" music in the score..
Chekov was not in "The Man Trap," as it was one of the early episodes produced in season 1.

Chekov was introduced in season 2.
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Old August 2 2013, 03:12 PM   #37
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

Most of what I'd want to say on this topic has been said by others. But when I was in college, TOS was being syndicated on a local UHF station and was usually being watched in the dorm lounge by at least a few, maybe many if one of the "good ones".

Also since Robert J. Sawyer has been mentioned, I would point out that his novels almost always include Trek references, either as "throwaway" lines or occasionally as plot points.
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Old August 2 2013, 03:34 PM   #38
Hambone
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

Let's see. My fondest memories of early 1970's Star Trek fandom are:

-The Making of Star Trek, The World of Star Trek, and "The Trouble With Tribbles". My original books are on my bookshelf, five feet away from me, as I type this.

-model kits and James Blish books

-paying for cable TV myself, out of my paper route money, so I could watch Star Trek on WTCM-TV out of Minneapolis. It cost $6.50 per month (my parents wouldn't pay it, as we got a whopping six channels)

-getting the latest Lincoln Enterprises catalog and collecting film clips

-the thrill of The Animated Series' original run. "Thrill"? You bet. These were new stories, and we were starving for them.

-publishing one of the earliest fanzines (Star Trek Nuts and Bolts) along with three friends. We solicited stories and artwork, and did all the editing and paste-up. One of the guys actually bought a used mimeograph machine so we could do the printing ourselves. We even figured out how to do bulk mailing. Not bad for 13- and 14-year-olds. It ran from 1974 to 1979, when Star Trek: The Motion Picture came out.

http://fanlore.org/wiki/Star_Trek_Nuts_%26_Bolts
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Last edited by Hambone; August 2 2013 at 03:46 PM.
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Old August 2 2013, 04:03 PM   #39
Warped9
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

E-DUB wrote: View Post
?..since Robert J. Sawyer has been mentioned, I would point out that his novels almost always include Trek references, either as "throwaway" lines or occasionally as plot points.
Very true!
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Old August 2 2013, 04:13 PM   #40
Redfern
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

I'm not sure how my era of fandom should be classified.

I was born in November 1962 and vaguely remember a sequence or two when the series first aired (specifically the "looming" shot of the Doomsday Machine as it slowly filled the screen accompanied by Sol Kaplan's score), but I remembered a bit more of "Lost in Space" when it still aired in prime-time.

It was actually the Fall of 1972 when I started to watch the syndicated reruns with rapt attention. And I did so initially so I'd know what to do when my childhood buddy Kyle wanted to play "let's pretend". (Today I guess we'd call it informal "role play", no dice, no rules, just on the spot improv'.) Kyle needed a Spock to play opposite his Kirk. Since I stood an inch or two taller than he and I possessed black hair, I got the role. Within a couple of months, I watched simply because I liked it.

Come September 1973, the animated series debuted and the the affiliate stopped airing the live-action reruns during the two years TAS aired. It did not return until the Fall of 1975. (Obviously, different affiliates handled broadcasts differently, but this was the way Birmingham, Alabama did it.)

Maybe I shoule be listed as a "first rerun" fan? Maybe there's a better term.

Anyway, a lot of points have already been mentioned, but one I didn't see (unless I just overlooked the text) was the (in)famous "Exploration Set" model kit by AMT. Yeah, we may laugh at it today given we can purchase properly scaled prop/toys released through Asylum Arts at a reasonable price. But at the time, the "kid sized" field gear was the answer to a lot of prayers. Before its release, Kyle and I had to "make do" with smuggled TV remotes as pocket phasers, binocular cases as tricorders, and probably most awkward, his mother's expended make-up "compacts" for communicators. Kyle kept the black rectangular case for himself (not that I blame him), but I got stuck with a pink circular one. I rarely "hailed the ship" if we played outside lest the older kids in the apartment complex spotted me! Finally, we had pieces that actually looked (more or less) like the equipment "real" landing parties used!

I never figured out how to make acceptable ears. Today, there exists all sorts of ear tip appliances, but during my personal "heyday" spanning from 1972 to 75 (when Kyle and I both moved from the complex), decent ear props just didn't exist. No, I didn't do the "cardboard schtick"; even I was not that dorky. A local magic shop sold "elf" ears, but they slipped over the entire ear and looked clownishly oversized. One time my father and I patroned a local "celebrity themed" restaurant and I saw a waiter dressed as Spock. His ears, while not as refined as Nimoy's appliances certainly looked better than the rubber "ear muffs" I saw in the shop. He explained that he used a material called "nose putty", basically a clay-like material used to build up distinctive facial features. Later, I bought a tube, but I never could shape it as I wanted and it sure as h3ll didn't want to adhere to my ears. (In retrospect, I assumed he used additional materials like spirit gum to "glue" the putty into place.) Of course, by the time we moved apart (Kyle to a different town), my incentive to "role play" was gone.

Sincerely,

Bill
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Old August 2 2013, 04:29 PM   #41
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

My parents watched it while I was an infant, so when I found it in the 70's, it clicked. I immediately identified with it. Yes, I caught hell in school. Wouldn't trade THE ONLY SERIES for anything.
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Old August 2 2013, 04:41 PM   #42
Warped9
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

I, too, caught a glimpse or two of the show in the late '60s, but I didn't start watching regularly until 1970.

I guess you could say the first wave of fans were those who saw the show from the beginning. The second wave could be those fans who started watching when it went into syndicated reruns throughout the '70s. And I would consider myself one of the second wave. The third wave could be those who got into the show after seeing one or more of the films, and admittedly the line would get blurry here. I've known of some folks who saw the films and had no idea they were spun off a decades old television series.

Any subsequent wave of TOS fans could have come from being introduced to Trek through any one of the spin-off series until finally you get to JJtrek.
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Old August 2 2013, 08:42 PM   #43
Galileo7
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

As a young boy in the mid-'70s, I first experienced both the reruns of TOS Mondays through Fridays and the new Saturday morning TAS. It was five years before TMP, so Star Trek was an important part of my boyhood.
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Old August 3 2013, 03:39 AM   #44
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

Interesting thoughts, Mr. Hengist.
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Old August 5 2013, 06:02 PM   #45
AtoZ
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Re: Being a TOS fan back in the day...

I think I got into Star Trek around 1970 as a 5 year-old. It was in reruns then; I remember watching it around my lunch on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. I remember asking for it, to watch it, as the weekends would approach.

I remember there was a local Buffalo station that began re-running TOS every weekday at 4pm around 1974. I rushed home that first day only to hear the telephone ring. It was my grandmother. God-bless her....she had been reading the TV Guide and saw that Trek was listed...and she called to tell me. If the weather was good we'd have a good picture, if it wasn't, I'd be watching Snow Trek......and loving it. Eventually I consumed everything TOS; the Blish books, the tech manual, the AMT offerings and Viewmaster.....even Spock Must Die!

I also remember my peers mocking my taste in entertainment. I had two friends that were closet fans. I remember pulling out the Blish books in school during reading period and being laughed at. It didn't bother me, TOS was far more intelligent and compelling than about 90% of anything else on at the time. - to me.

I remember my early teens years and being up at a summer camp as a staff member. One Saturday night the gang looked to head into town to see a movie. It was one of the Muppet movies from that period around 1981. NEVER AGAIN would I let anybody try to shame me for my love of TOS. Lol!

From about 78-84 I saw very little of my favorite all-time TV series. School and life in general kept me busy. One Wednesday night in 1984 I stumbled across TOS....The Tholian Web.....and believe me when I say this, it was like seeing some cherished, old friends once again after many years. I was hooked all over again.
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