RSS iconTwitter iconFacebook icon

The Trek BBS title image

The Trek BBS statistics

Threads: 139,235
Posts: 5,406,303
Members: 24,762
Currently online: 659
Newest member: PaulHicks

TrekToday headlines

Star Trek Online Adds More Voyager Actors
By: T'Bonz on Sep 2

The Wil Wheaton Project Axed
By: T'Bonz on Sep 2

Kurtzman’s Production Company Signs Deal
By: T'Bonz on Sep 2

Retro Review: Time’s Orphan
By: Michelle on Aug 30

September-October Trek Conventions And Appearances
By: T'Bonz on Aug 29

Lee Passes
By: T'Bonz on Aug 29

Trek Merchandise Sale
By: T'Bonz on Aug 28

Star Trek #39 Villain Revealed
By: T'Bonz on Aug 28

Trek Big Bang Figures
By: T'Bonz on Aug 28

Star Trek Seekers Cover Art
By: T'Bonz on Aug 27


Welcome! The Trek BBS is the number one place to chat about Star Trek with like-minded fans. Please login to see our full range of forums as well as the ability to send and receive private messages, track your favourite topics and of course join in the discussions.

If you are a new visitor, join us for free. If you are an existing member please login below. Note: for members who joined under our old messageboard system, please login with your display name not your login name.


Go Back   The Trek BBS > Entertainment & Interests > Science Fiction & Fantasy > Doctor Who

Doctor Who "Bigger on the inside..."

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old October 19 2009, 06:16 PM   #1
Steve67
Commander
 
Steve67's Avatar
 
Location: 'The Transformed Man' Recording Sessions
The ABOUT TIME Books

I have vols. 4 and 5 of Lawrence Miles and Tat Wood's excellent About Time: The Unauthorized Guide to Doctor Who. Each book goes into wonderfully excruciatingly analytical detail about every episode of the classic series and is a nice British pop culture primer for we "Yanks" who are also Anglophiles! I have vol. 3 (revised, expanded second edition) on order and eagerly await the authors' (well, just Wood; Miles is not credited on the 2nd edition) as I venture into the Jon Pertwee Era of Dr. Who.

I grew up worshipping Tom Baker's incarnation as The Doctor and after decades away from the program, I look forward to exploring his predecessors' work on the show.

Has anyone else read these fantastic books?
__________________
"Come, come, Mr. Scott. Young minds, fresh ideas. Be tolerant!"
Steve67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 19 2009, 07:00 PM   #2
The
Rear Admiral
 
The's Avatar
 
Location: Tomorrow
View The's Twitter Profile
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

No, but now that I know they exist, I'm placing them on my Amazon Wish List...
The is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 19 2009, 08:39 PM   #3
Allyn Gibson
Vice Admiral
 
Allyn Gibson's Avatar
 
Location: South Pennsyltucky
View Allyn Gibson's Twitter Profile Send a message via AIM to Allyn Gibson Send a message via Yahoo to Allyn Gibson
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

They're fantastic!

The explanation for "The Two Doctors" presages Time-Crash, interestingly.

They deal pretty well with the controversial points of Who continuity, and while you may not agree with their conclusions they will make you think.

There are some annoying tendencies throughout the series. They take a fair few swipes at the RTD-era, and Wood really hates the 1996 television movie.

I'm glad I have this series. Puts the Handbooks to shame.
Allyn Gibson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 19 2009, 10:21 PM   #4
OmahaStar
Disrespectful of his betters
 
OmahaStar's Avatar
 
Location: OmahaStar
View OmahaStar's Twitter Profile Send a message via Windows Live Messenger to OmahaStar Send a message via Yahoo to OmahaStar
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Allyn Gibson wrote: View Post
I'm glad I have this series. Puts the Handbooks to shame.
I've got the Sixth Doctor handbook, and the omnibus of Handbook and Television Companion, and find them quite useful. How does the About Time series put the Handbooks to shame?
__________________
"Sorry. Wrong movie, buddy."
OmahaStar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 19 2009, 10:40 PM   #5
Emh
Doctor of TARDIS
 
Emh's Avatar
 
Location: Brussels, Belgium
Send a message via ICQ to Emh Send a message via AIM to Emh Send a message via Windows Live Messenger to Emh Send a message via Yahoo to Emh
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

I heard about these books not to long ago. I might check them out when I have the time.
__________________
"Eccleston was a tiger and Tennant was, well, Tigger. Smith [is] an uncoordinated housecat who pretends that he meant to do that after falling off a piece of furniture." - Lynne M. Thomas

"I'm in Hell and it's full of Avons!" - Vila
Emh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20 2009, 12:11 AM   #6
Steve Roby
Commodore
 
Steve Roby's Avatar
 
Location: Ottawa, ON Canada
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

I've only read the one on the Hartnell years so far, but I liked it. There are plenty of episode guides with the basic facts out there. It's the opinions and essays that make About Time interesting.

Still have to get the revised one on the Pertwee years, and the first Time Unincorporated. Mad Norwegian publishes some really good stuff. Dunno what I would have done a few years ago without the I, Who books.
Steve Roby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20 2009, 02:38 AM   #7
Steve67
Commander
 
Steve67's Avatar
 
Location: 'The Transformed Man' Recording Sessions
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Lord Ob wrote: View Post
Allyn Gibson wrote: View Post
I'm glad I have this series. Puts the Handbooks to shame.
I've got the Sixth Doctor handbook, and the omnibus of Handbook and Television Companion, and find them quite useful. How does the About Time series put the Handbooks to shame?
I can't speak to what the Handbooks and the others include (I've never read them), but the About Time authors assume the reader knows more than a bit about DW and takes it from there, as there's not much in the way of episode summaries, other than a brief--and often amusing--reminder of what a given story is about.

Continuity is seriously looked at and scrutinized--but then so is everything about DW! They aren't afraid to take shots at the shoddy production, but then they give credit when things look impressive, too.

Behind the scenes battles are covered: producers, the BBC, the actors and their feuds. Endlessly interesting and a goldmine for Whovians.

The essays are thought provoking and there's much more detail in the books than can be described here about every aspect of the show--except the aforementioned episode synopses!

Amazon has the "Search inside this book" feature, so you can read a few pages to get an idea of how it's set up.
__________________
"Come, come, Mr. Scott. Young minds, fresh ideas. Be tolerant!"
Steve67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20 2009, 03:57 AM   #8
Cutter John
Rear Admiral
 
Cutter John's Avatar
 
Location: Beyond the wall of sleep, just south of Seattle.
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Sure make them sould interestign Steve. I'm a sucker for 'behiond the scenes' info, and I've never had patience with books/shows that throw in recaps or intros meant to get first timers up to speed. So these sound right up my alley.

Anyway, thanks for the heads up. Just ordered a used copy of Vol 1 off Amazon.
__________________
"The way I see it, every life is a pile of good things and bad things. The good things don't always soften the bad things. But vice versa, the bad things don't necessarily spoil the good things or make them unimportant."

Last edited by Cutter John; October 20 2009 at 04:15 AM.
Cutter John is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20 2009, 05:27 PM   #9
Steve67
Commander
 
Steve67's Avatar
 
Location: 'The Transformed Man' Recording Sessions
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Another amusing aspect of these books is the inclusion on the cover of a given era's worst special effect or monster. In vol. 4, which covers the Tom Baker era, the giant rat from "The Talons of Weng-Chiang" is featured on the cover.

The scathing but obviously affectionate humor is part of what makes this series so much fun to read. I've never even seen much outside the Tom Baker era, but I still want to get all of these books! The first edition of vol. 3 went out of print and is still fetching HUGE $$$ on the secondary market! The second edition adds 200+ pages of additional material.
__________________
"Come, come, Mr. Scott. Young minds, fresh ideas. Be tolerant!"
Steve67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20 2009, 08:41 PM   #10
Andrew_Kearley
Captain
 
Andrew_Kearley's Avatar
 
Location: Moonbase Alpha
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

The most important aspect of these books, I think, is that they're not just about Doctor Who. They're about the social/political/cultural history of the times in which the series was made. As such, there's an awful lot of background on what was going on in the world and what the writers might have been thinking of when they wrote the episodes. The books explore that subtext brilliantly, and demonstrate how Doctor Who wasn't just created in its own bubble, but was part of a larger cultural landscape - this is stuff that would have been prevalent in the minds of the original viewers, who would have understood the resonances in the scripts, something that perhaps we don't see at a thirty year remove - and it's this grounding of the series in the reality of the times that really make these books worthwhile. Having said that, the revised edition of the third volume is just too long - it's the only one of these books that drags a bit.
__________________
Blog: Anderthon Follow my journey through the worlds of Gerry and Sylvia Anderson

Doctor Who - The Complete Adventures
Andrew_Kearley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20 2009, 11:04 PM   #11
Steve67
Commander
 
Steve67's Avatar
 
Location: 'The Transformed Man' Recording Sessions
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Andrew_Kearley wrote: View Post
The most important aspect of these books, I think, is that they're not just about Doctor Who. They're about the social/political/cultural history of the times in which the series was made. As such, there's an awful lot of background on what was going on in the world and what the writers might have been thinking of when they wrote the episodes. The books explore that subtext brilliantly, and demonstrate how Doctor Who wasn't just created in its own bubble, but was part of a larger cultural landscape - this is stuff that would have been prevalent in the minds of the original viewers, who would have understood the resonances in the scripts, something that perhaps we don't see at a thirty year remove - and it's this grounding of the series in the reality of the times that really make these books worthwhile.
Well said!

Does Trek have anything like About Time?
__________________
"Come, come, Mr. Scott. Young minds, fresh ideas. Be tolerant!"
Steve67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 20 2009, 11:21 PM   #12
OmahaStar
Disrespectful of his betters
 
OmahaStar's Avatar
 
Location: OmahaStar
View OmahaStar's Twitter Profile Send a message via Windows Live Messenger to OmahaStar Send a message via Yahoo to OmahaStar
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Steve67 wrote: View Post

Does Trek have anything like About Time?
lol nope.
__________________
"Sorry. Wrong movie, buddy."
OmahaStar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 21 2009, 12:23 AM   #13
Steve67
Commander
 
Steve67's Avatar
 
Location: 'The Transformed Man' Recording Sessions
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Lord Ob wrote: View Post
Steve67 wrote: View Post

Does Trek have anything like About Time?
lol nope.
Rhetorical question. But I'm still surprised that after all this time and how "rabid" the fanbase is, that there isn't.
__________________
"Come, come, Mr. Scott. Young minds, fresh ideas. Be tolerant!"
Steve67 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 21 2009, 01:00 AM   #14
Phillip Culley
Captain
 
Phillip Culley's Avatar
 
Location: Kitchener ON
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Allyn Gibson wrote: View Post
I'm glad I have this series. Puts the Handbooks to shame.
Although you're more likely to find actual correct facts in the Handbook, whereas the About Time series is full of errors...
Phillip Culley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old October 21 2009, 11:51 PM   #15
diankra
Commodore
 
Location: UK
Re: The ABOUT TIME Books

Andrew_Kearley wrote: View Post
The most important aspect of these books, I think, is that they're not just about Doctor Who. They're about the social/political/cultural history of the times in which the series was made. As such, there's an awful lot of background on what was going on in the world and what the writers might have been thinking of when they wrote the episodes. The books explore that subtext brilliantly, and demonstrate how Doctor Who wasn't just created in its own bubble, but was part of a larger cultural landscape - this is stuff that would have been prevalent in the minds of the original viewers, who would have understood the resonances in the scripts, something that perhaps we don't see at a thirty year remove - and it's this grounding of the series in the reality of the times that really make these books worthwhile. Having said that, the revised edition of the third volume is just too long - it's the only one of these books that drags a bit.
Well, that whole understanding of the trivia and [what's the opposite of trivia - the supposedly important, but maybe not in retrospect, stuff? Doesn't seem to be a word.] is what Tat does, and what makes him such a joy to spend a night at the pub with...
__________________
"Some days are better than others. They say that where I come from."
"Loudly, I imagine, on the day you left."
(Blake's 7 - Rumours of Death)
diankra is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
about time book series

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 12:10 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.6
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
FireFox 2+ or Internet Explorer 7+ highly recommended.