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Old March 20 2013, 02:38 AM   #61
USS Excelsior
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

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Old March 21 2013, 10:55 AM   #62
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

It takes less than a week to start sounding like the locals. When I went to England, before I left I was already thinking aloud in my head with an English accent. I've already gone Upper Midwest internally even if I still sound like a fahkin' masshole.
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Old March 22 2013, 02:30 PM   #63
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

NPR had a hollywood dialogue coach on some time ago talking about how your "classic" British accent (if there is such a thing) is almost identical to the old antebellum Southern accent. the only difference was that the Southern accent was more tonal. That might be a reason why so many Southern characters in the movies and teevee are played by British actors. Think Vivian Leigh in Gone With the Wind, Andrew Lincoln in Walking Dead, Stephen Moyer in True Blood, and every single character with a Southern accent in Blackhawk Down.

Additionally, your more Appalachian accents tend to be more Scottish...kinda clipped and nasally (Liam Neeson in Next of Kin).

Then when you get more towards Louisiana, it's a mix of all kinds of accents. Have you ever noticed how some people from around New Orleans sound almost like they have New Jersey accents? Was there a lot of French influence up in Jersey?.
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Old March 22 2013, 02:36 PM   #64
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Stephen Moyer's English?
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Old March 22 2013, 02:38 PM   #65
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

^My dad was born and raised in New Orleans, and his family have been there since the mid 18th century. The accents of my extended family are...amazing. I first met my grandfather at a family reunion when I was 5. We were having BBQ and I recall being baffled and a bit giggly when he asked me for "mine-ass." He wanted mayonaise.
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Old March 22 2013, 02:40 PM   #66
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Deckerd wrote: View Post
Stephen Moyer's English?
Yeah. What's even more interesting is that Ryan Kwanten is Australian.
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Old March 22 2013, 02:42 PM   #67
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Well shut my mouth.
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Old March 22 2013, 05:32 PM   #68
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Man Afraid of his Shoes wrote: View Post
. . . Have you ever noticed how some people from around New Orleans sound almost like they have New Jersey accents? Was there a lot of French influence up in Jersey?
Don't you mean "Noo Joisey"?

I've always been curious about that similarity, especially the hybridization of the "oi" and "er" sounds in both the NY/NJ and Mississippi Delta accents. How did the same pronunciation arise in two regions a thousand miles apart, with very different cultural influences?

Big wheel keep on toinin',
Proud Mary keep on boinin' . . .
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Old March 22 2013, 05:36 PM   #69
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

And, of course, New Orleans is often pronounced "Nawlens" both down in Louisiana as well as elsewhere in the American South. As well as the different ways to pronounce the Appalachian Mountains that's been touched on in other language, dialect and accent threads over time.
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Old March 22 2013, 07:53 PM   #70
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

scotpens wrote: View Post
Man Afraid of his Shoes wrote: View Post
. . . Have you ever noticed how some people from around New Orleans sound almost like they have New Jersey accents? Was there a lot of French influence up in Jersey?
Don't you mean "Noo Joisey"?

I've always been curious about that similarity, especially the hybridization of the "oi" and "er" sounds in both the NY/NJ and Mississippi Delta accents. How did the same pronunciation arise in two regions a thousand miles apart, with very different cultural influences?

Big wheel keep on toinin',
Proud Mary keep on boinin' . . .
But were they very different cultural influences? I'm betting there's a connection somewhere. That's why I was wondering if there was a heavy French influence in early New Jersey.
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Old March 22 2013, 08:01 PM   #71
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Let's face it, you have a country the size of a continent and we have an island. We win on the dialect stakes hands down.
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Old March 22 2013, 08:25 PM   #72
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Man Afraid of his Shoes wrote: View Post
scotpens wrote: View Post
Man Afraid of his Shoes wrote: View Post
. . . Have you ever noticed how some people from around New Orleans sound almost like they have New Jersey accents? Was there a lot of French influence up in Jersey?
Don't you mean "Noo Joisey"?

I've always been curious about that similarity, especially the hybridization of the "oi" and "er" sounds in both the NY/NJ and Mississippi Delta accents. How did the same pronunciation arise in two regions a thousand miles apart, with very different cultural influences?

Big wheel keep on toinin',
Proud Mary keep on boinin' . . .
But were they very different cultural influences? I'm betting there's a connection somewhere. That's why I was wondering if there was a heavy French influence in early New Jersey.
Is Tennessee in the Delta? Because Tina Turner was born and raised in Nutbush, Tennessee. John Fogerty is from California.

My mother has lived in California for 40 years and stills sounds like she's from Tennessee. I revert to a southern accent if I spend too much time there.
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Old March 22 2013, 08:30 PM   #73
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Nerys Myk wrote: View Post
Man Afraid of his Shoes wrote: View Post
scotpens wrote: View Post
Don't you mean "Noo Joisey"?

I've always been curious about that similarity, especially the hybridization of the "oi" and "er" sounds in both the NY/NJ and Mississippi Delta accents. How did the same pronunciation arise in two regions a thousand miles apart, with very different cultural influences?

Big wheel keep on toinin',
Proud Mary keep on boinin' . . .
But were they very different cultural influences? I'm betting there's a connection somewhere. That's why I was wondering if there was a heavy French influence in early New Jersey.
Is Tennessee in the Delta? Because Tina Turner was born and raised in Nutbush, Tennessee. John Fogerty is from California.
West Tennessee is pretty close. It's all pretty much swampland around Memphis (Nutbush is about an hour away).

Somewhat related, but the other day I was watching some show on one of the History Channels about Moonshiners...probably up around Western North Carolina, and when ever some of them were talking, they were showing subtitles. I remember thinking, "What the hell are they doing that for? I can understand him plain as day!"

Then I thought to myself, "Maybe I better keep that my little secret." So here I am blabbing it to you all.
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Last edited by Man Afraid of his Shoes; March 22 2013 at 08:50 PM.
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Old March 23 2013, 04:05 AM   #74
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

Man Afraid of his Shoes wrote: View Post
scotpens wrote: View Post
Man Afraid of his Shoes wrote: View Post
. . . Have you ever noticed how some people from around New Orleans sound almost like they have New Jersey accents? Was there a lot of French influence up in Jersey?
Don't you mean "Noo Joisey"?

I've always been curious about that similarity, especially the hybridization of the "oi" and "er" sounds in both the NY/NJ and Mississippi Delta accents. How did the same pronunciation arise in two regions a thousand miles apart, with very different cultural influences?

Big wheel keep on toinin',
Proud Mary keep on boinin' . . .
But were they very different cultural influences? I'm betting there's a connection somewhere. That's why I was wondering if there was a heavy French influence in early New Jersey.
In early New Jersey, you're much more likely to find Dutch settlers (or, in smaller numbers, Swedish.) The English arrived later, and I can't really think of any significant French influence there at any time. The French would have been to the north (Canada) and to the west (Great Lakes, Mississippi River & tributaries.)
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Old March 23 2013, 04:24 AM   #75
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Re: old english accent was closer to American southern accent

cooleddie74 wrote: View Post
As well as the different ways to pronounce the Appalachian Mountains that's been touched on in other language, dialect and accent threads over time.
Ahem. There is only one way to pronounce Appalachian; the other/s is/are heretical and wrong.
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