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Old October 12 2012, 06:46 PM   #16
blssdwlf
Commodore
 
Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Timo wrote: View Post
How does something the size of the running light jeapordize the ship when the other running lights of the same size and protrusion do not?
and among the study procedures is the launching of an ion pod.
However, launching that ion pod is NOT part of any study procedures but an emergency procedure to protect the ship according to the episode. Finney was in there to take readings, not to prep it for launching. I'd argue that the pod was already attached and held away from the ship not the equivalent of an attached light enclosure which could bear no danger to the ship. If it put the ship at such risk as you suggest, Kirk would've simply turned the ship out of the storm and kept the running light-pod attached.
SPOCK: Attention, Commander Finney, report to pod for reading on ion plates.
...
FINNEY [OC]: Finney here, Captain. Ion readings in progress.
KIRK: Make it fast, Ben. I may have to go to Red Alert.
...
SHAW: Freeze that! If the court will notice, the log plainly shows the defendant's finger pressing the jettison button. The condition signal reads Yellow Alert. Not red alert, but simply Yellow Alert. When the pod containing Lieutenant Commander Finney was jettisoned, the emergency did not as yet exist.
Timo wrote: View Post
The idea of different timelines for different fragments of Trek is pretty silly. It's all falling apart at the seams in TOS already; no reason to make it any worse.
Then stories like "Parallels" must be silly right? TOS timelines don't fit well withing TNG and onwards, but neither does TNG's own dates either. If you want to argue about falling apart at the seams, why not address why Voyager's version of ST6 is different? Or TNG's Shroedinger Kirk problem. TNG's "Parallels" (and TOS' "Alternate Factor", "Mirror,Mirror") offer up the a simple way to reconcile the time issues and major differences between TOS and TNG onwards as simple parallel universes.

Last edited by blssdwlf; October 12 2012 at 06:59 PM.
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Old October 12 2012, 10:17 PM   #17
Robert Comsol
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Timo wrote: View Post
two "ion pod" running lights near the stern
"Or just one, considering the overall lack of symmetry on the ship..."
There...are...two...(running) lights!

http://tos.trekcore.com/gallery/albu...Factor_375.JPG (port side light ON)
http://tos.trekcore.com/gallery/albu...Factor_376.JPG (port side light OFF)

and just one ion pod.

http://tos.trekcore.com/hd/albums/1x...rtialhd361.jpg

(Captain Kirk: Is today Tuesday or Wednesday? On Tuesdays I launch the port ion pod, on Wednesdays I launch the starboard ion pod. Or was it the other way 'round?)

Bob
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Old October 13 2012, 04:53 PM   #18
Timo
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

launching that ion pod is NOT part of any study procedures but an emergency procedure to protect the ship according to the episode.
Only according to one interpretation. The other one makes better overall sense.

Finney was in there to take readings, not to prep it for launching.
Only according to one interpretation. The other one makes better overall sense.

Finney needs to go to the pod and get the ion readings going, but he also needs to get out of it before it is jettisoned. Makes perfect sense if the intent all along is to prepare the pod for jettisoning.

Kirk needs to fly the ship in tricky conditions, splitting his attention between dozens of things - so he cannot verbally communicate with all the people involved, but needs to have his hand hovering over mission-critical controls, chief among them the pod deployment button. Instead of warning Finney of launch verbally, he gives a collective warning by signaling alert, as plenty of other things apparently will take place simultaneously in this hectic operation. But launching of the pod is at the very heart of the operation, as evidenced by the fact that a button in Kirk's own console is dedicated to this function. It's not an emergency-related procedure, it's something literally built in to this mission profile.

If it put the ship at such risk as you suggest, Kirk would've simply turned the ship out of the storm and kept the running light-pod attached.
That wouldn't be an option unless the edge of the storm were nearby. And the point of such a "tornado hunting" study would no doubt be to get as deep as one dares.

and just one ion pod.
Are you positive? I mean, what about negative ions?

Really, a big part of why I like the idea of this thing being the ion pod is because it would be logical for the ship to have small auxiliary craft of this sort, launched from chutes (a classic design from the 1950s, both in comics and in the serious engineering studies that the comics were modeled after). Among the things launched from the chute would be repair pods, recorder markers, possibly garbage bags and body bags as well - plus this one ion pod, for the rare once when the ship crosses paths with an interesting ion storm.

I would frankly have been even more thrilled had the round feature next to the pod in TOS-R been another chute, rather than an explicit porthole. But I can live with two chutes and their associated observation ports.

If you want to argue about falling apart at the seams, why not address why Voyager's version of ST6 is different?
Oh, that's trivial - the entire point of the VOY episode was that it was a false dream. It was important that there be excessive, unreal death and suffering in the dream, as this was the established symptom of the disease Tuvok was suffering from.

Timo Saloniemi
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Old October 13 2012, 06:25 PM   #19
blssdwlf
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Timo wrote: View Post
Finney needs to go to the pod and get the ion readings going, but he also needs to get out of it before it is jettisoned. Makes perfect sense if the intent all along is to prepare the pod for jettisoning.
If you want to interpret that way then you need to be able to prove that launching the pod was part of the mission.

The episode made launching the pod contingent on an emergency condition when Red Alert is called.

In other words, when they flew into the ion storm they may or may not have an emergency. The ion pod's mission would not have been included being ejected as a normal operation. But since having the pod was considered dangerous enough to jeopardize the ship, it was normal to have an extra button just to eject it in an emergency.
KIRK: Make it fast, Ben. I may have to go to Red Alert.
...
SHAW: Freeze that! If the court will notice, the log plainly shows the defendant's finger pressing the jettison button. The condition signal reads Yellow Alert. Not red alert, but simply Yellow Alert. When the pod containing Lieutenant Commander Finney was jettisoned, the emergency did not as yet exist.
Timo wrote: View Post
If you want to argue about falling apart at the seams, why not address why Voyager's version of ST6 is different?
Oh, that's trivial - the entire point of the VOY episode was that it was a false dream. It was important that there be excessive, unreal death and suffering in the dream, as this was the established symptom of the disease Tuvok was suffering from.
The episode presented Tuvok's flashback as a legitimate part of Voyager history. It'd be trivial to just put TOS on a different continuity to account for the death on the Excelsior. It'll be like watching "Parallels" all over again
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Old October 13 2012, 06:56 PM   #20
Timo
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

If you want to interpret that way then you need to be able to prove that launching the pod was part of the mission.
Not really. I only need to claim it. Everything else follows from the claim.

But the proof is obvious: a dedicated button was installed* in Kirk's very command chair for launching the pod. The jettison was not just part of the mission, it was the mission.

The episode made launching the pod contingent on an emergency condition when Red Alert is called.
To the contrary, the pod could be launched unrelated to any emergency; there even was a totally separate button for it.

It just happens that there would be various ways to get Finney safely out of the pod before the launch, including ordering him out and then waiting to hear from him; sounding red alert which would mean it's Finney's own damn fault if he lingers; or sending a crewman to drag him out. Kirk did not do the first or the third thing, but would not have been negligent had he done the second, equally good thing. Which he did in reality, but not according to the evidence the prosecution presented.

Timo Saloniemi

* By "install", I of course mean Kirk or his technician keyed in a command that altered the function of one of the regular buttons, causing the new function to be presented in text next to the button. Kirk often seems to fiddle with those settings, so that the Intercom and Yellow Alert buttons keep switching places...
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Old October 13 2012, 10:08 PM   #21
blssdwlf
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Timo wrote: View Post
If you want to interpret that way then you need to be able to prove that launching the pod was part of the mission.
Not really. I only need to claim it. Everything else follows from the claim.
The problem is that the claim meets none of the criteria set forth by the episode. I doubt the mission was to launch the pod. If it was the dialogue would've at least mentioned prepping it for launch. Instead we have from the dialogue:

That there is a list of crewmen that take turns to go into the ion pod:
KIRK: Weather scan indicated an ion storm dead ahead. I sent Finney into the pod.
STONE: Why Finney?
KIRK: His name was at the top of the duty roster.
STONE: If he blamed you
KIRK: He may have blamed me that he never rose to command a ship, but I don't assign jobs on the basis of who blames me. It was Finney's turn, and I assigned him. He had just checked in with me from the pod when we hit the leading edge of the storm.
And inside the pod they take readings
FINNEY [OC]: Finney here, Captain. Ion readings in progress.
And the ion pod must be jettisoned in an emergency:
KIRK: Given the same circumstances I would do the same thing without hesitation, because the steps I took in the order I took them were absolutely necessary if I were to save my ship. And nothing is more important than my ship.
KIRK: I agree. I waited until the last possible moment. We were on Red Alert. The storm got worse. I had to jettison the pod.
Timo wrote: View Post
But the proof is obvious: a dedicated button was installed* in Kirk's very command chair for launching the pod. The jettison was not just part of the mission, it was the mission.
Are you also claiming "Yellow Alert" and "Red Alert" was also the mission? It's pretty obvious that the jettison button there is because only the Captain has the authority to eject the pod. Plus if the emergency created by the pod in a force 7 ion storm was that great, it would make sense to cut out the middle guy when hitting the eject button. That also conveniently makes Kirk on the hook if something went wrong - thus the episode
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Old October 13 2012, 10:53 PM   #22
Albertese
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

I think it's somewhat telling that the word "jettison" is used, rather than the word "launch."

In fact I just checked, and the word "jettison" (or "jettisoned") is said exactly ten times in the episode. The word "launch" is said exactly zero times in the episode.

"Launch" would suggest a planned operation with maybe a countdown and all the sundry ceremony that a preplanned operation would include. It's a controlled and coordinated process.

"Jettison," OTOH, at least to my thinking, is more in the family of words like "abort" and "eject" and such emergency contingency words.

Here's some synonyms from thefreedictionary.com:

jettison
verb
1. abandon, reject, desert, dump, shed, scrap, throw out, discard, throw away, relinquish, forsake, slough off, throw on the scrapheap. "The government seems to have jettisoned the plan."
2. expel, dump, unload, throw overboard, eject, heave. "The crew jettisoned excess fuel and made an emergency landing."
The word comes from the Old English to throw burdensome weight over the side of a ship to lighten it. It's the same root for the word "jetsam" which is essentially ocean-going garbage. If the ion pod was being "launched" then why not use the word "launch" instead of the word for "oh-crap, get-this-thing-the-hell-off-my-ship-and-I-mean-right-now!"

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Last edited by Albertese; October 13 2012 at 11:03 PM.
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Old October 14 2012, 10:49 AM   #23
Mytran
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

For those who haven't read it, this thread and specifically this post shed light on the original thinking behind why jettisoning an Ion Pod might be neccessary.
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Old October 14 2012, 03:52 PM   #24
blssdwlf
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Thanks for the back threads, Mytran. Yeah, the episode supports that the ion pod could become a danger to the ship requiring an emergency "jettison" but it is not meant to be "launched".
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Old October 14 2012, 04:38 PM   #25
Timo
Admiral
 
Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

That there is a list of crewmen that take turns to go into the ion pod
...To prepare it for each sortie into an ion storm - a sortie that never lasts long enough to involve multiple crew.

The task falls on a qualified person who isn't tasked with something else at the time; the duty roster exists for that very reason. The alternative would be to have a dedicated pod-preparing person, which would be really silly if the task calls for the expertise of a Lieutenant Commander or even a Lieutenant. You don't tie down somebody of that caliber with a single duty; you rotate your personnel resources.

And inside the pod they take readings
...They prep the pod so that as the end result, readings are in progress, and will continue to do so throughout the flight of the pod.

And the ion pod must be jettisoned in an emergency
...It must be jettisoned before an emergency. If there's an emergency, then it's almost too late, and there's no time to ensure that the preparations guy gets out - the skipper has to trust that he follows the procedure relating to Red Alert.

Are you also claiming "Yellow Alert" and "Red Alert" was also the mission?
Certainly. The crew knows exactly what to do when Red Alert is sounded in these circumstances, and it's a procedure specific to the circumstances. For Finney, it means "get out of the pod, we're launching regardless of whether you're ready or not", a meaning it will not have in any other circumstances.

For Kirk, the special mission involves configuring his console in a very specific manner, with just three functionalities out of five keyed in. These are in a specific order dictated by the nature of the mission: fly in, press Yellow Alert, fly deeper in, press Red Alert, press Jettison Pod, get the hell out of Dodge.

It's pretty obvious that the jettison button there is because only the Captain has the authority to eject the pod.
Indeed. So, solid proof that the mission is all about firing the pod into the storm.

...if the emergency created by the pod in a force 7 ion storm was that great, it would make sense to cut out the middle guy when hitting the eject button.
If the emergency were that great, there would be no pod in the first place.

It's not as if the pod is detrimental by default. Nor is it likely that it becomes detrimental at any specific point, because the person in charge of the jettison button has no access to data specifying the point.

Kirk says they began encountering "difficulties": "variant stress, Force 7, the works". Extremely vaguely put if he's discussing the approaching of a preset cutoff point. Then he adds that "finally" he had to signal Red Alert. It's fuzzy logic through and through, not a preset point of any sort.

In contrast, if we assume that Kirk's mission was to deliver the pod, he'd do that exactly when Finney was ready, storm status be damned. Only if the storm got worse would he cut and run, launching a semi-prepared pod for at least partial scientific return (because at the very least the readings on the ion plates were in progress) and then saving the ship in a completely separate maneuver that might still utterly fail despite the pod having been jettisoned.

Nothing in the dialogue explicitly indicates that the pod would be a danger to the ship. So that silly idea is best dropped regardless of what interpretation we choose.

If the ion pod was being "launched" then why not use the word "launch"
Because the pod would be an unpropelled rather than a propelled device, simply dumped overboard to begin its mission. You just "let it loose" and allow the storm to carry it away.

Timo Saloniemi
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Old October 14 2012, 07:17 PM   #26
Albertese
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Timo wrote: View Post

...

If the ion pod was being "launched" then why not use the word "launch"
Because the pod would be an unpropelled rather than a propelled device, simply dumped overboard to begin its mission. You just "let it loose" and allow the storm to carry it away.

Timo Saloniemi
So you're saying it's disposable? As in disposable as an assumed role for it's mission? That would mean that Enterprise is only capable of studying one, or at most two (assuming another pod in the symmetrical location on the other side of the ship), ion storms ever without a base layover. We know they can't load another one from the inside because in TOSr we see the device in question being installed from the outside of the ship.

To me this brings up some odd assumptions. Why would Starfleet require it's ships to be carrying bulky disposable single use items to cover the measurement of one fairly isolated phenomenon? If ion storms are common enough for their regular measurement and study to be a standard mission of Starfleet ships, then why equip ship's with the goods to only ever study two? If they are more rare, then why equip ships with big bulky elements that only have one, occasionally called upon use?

It seems most likely to me that the ion pod(s) are there to study ion storms and other ion-related phenomena but they aren't disposable. I posit that the ship has its shields up during the fly-through (and Yellow alert is standard practice) but for the pod to work, it must be extended on some kind of boom to outside the shield envelope, where, if things get bad, it can function in an analogous way to a sea anchor and can put the ship in extreme danger. If something goes wrong enough, then the ship goes to Red alert and the offending pod is jettisoned -- that is, cut off from the ship and ejected away in order to prevent whatever greater damage would be caused by allowing it to drag. This is an emergency procedure. If things go by the book, then after the readings are taken on the ion plates, then the whole shebang is reeled back in and the hapless crew member hops out none-the-worse-for-wear.

Why can't this whole operation be automated, sparing the risk and exposure of a crewman? Perhaps the nature of the ion storm causes interference to make computers unreliable or even non-functional. The process can only be carried out manually. This might explain how Finney got out in time without there being any record of it: since automation is unreliable, there is an emergency line which is on a spring loaded pulley system which can yank the crewman back if he tugs the cord. This is a totally mechanical system and when Finney got back aboard, he released the lock and let the line roll back into space, making it appear that he was lost and then stashed his space suit and proceeded to monkey around with the log records.

Now, for my money, this is the only scenario that makes a lick of sense. Your mileage may vary, of course. But that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

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Old October 14 2012, 08:25 PM   #27
blssdwlf
Commodore
 
Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Timo wrote: View Post
That there is a list of crewmen that take turns to go into the ion pod
...To prepare it for each sortie into an ion storm - a sortie that never lasts long enough to involve multiple crew.

The task falls on a qualified person who isn't tasked with something else at the time; the duty roster exists for that very reason. The alternative would be to have a dedicated pod-preparing person, which would be really silly if the task calls for the expertise of a Lieutenant Commander or even a Lieutenant. You don't tie down somebody of that caliber with a single duty; you rotate your personnel resources.
And inside the pod they take readings
...They prep the pod so that as the end result, readings are in progress, and will continue to do so throughout the flight of the pod.
Nothing in the dialogue mentions or even suggests "preparation". Got a quote?

Also, what was the pod going to do once jettisoned? We know that ion storms wreak havoc with equipment making them unreliable or inoperative. That's probably why they need a guy in the pod just to "take readings" as said in the episode and not a guy remotely connected to it via a long control circuit/cable.

Jettisoning the ion pod would gain them no additional sensor information or scientific purpose. But, the episode made it clear that keeping the pod attached during an emergency would've destroyed the ship.

Timo wrote: View Post
...It must be jettisoned before an emergency.
Whoa Timo, if that was true, then there would be no trial!

The very reason that Kirk is on trial is because he is being blamed for jettisoning the ion pod before an emergency.
SHAW: Freeze that! If the court will notice, the log plainly shows the defendant's finger pressing the jettison button. The condition signal reads Yellow Alert. Not red alert, but simply Yellow Alert. When the pod containing Lieutenant Commander Finney was jettisoned, the emergency did not as yet exist.
Timo wrote: View Post
Nothing in the dialogue explicitly indicates that the pod would be a danger to the ship. So that silly idea is best dropped regardless of what interpretation we choose.
If the pod was no danger to the ship then why do they need to eject it only in an emergency?
KIRK: I agree. I waited until the last possible moment. We were on Red Alert. The storm got worse. I had to jettison the pod.

SPOCK: It reports that the jettison button was pressed before the Red Alert.
SHAW: In other words, it reports that Captain Kirk was reacting to an extreme emergency that did not then exist.

KIRK: Given the same circumstances I would do the same thing without hesitation, because the steps I took in the order I took them were absolutely necessary if I were to save my ship. And nothing is more important than my ship.
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Old October 14 2012, 08:27 PM   #28
Timo
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

That would mean that Enterprise is only capable of studying one, or at most two (assuming another pod in the symmetrical location on the other side of the ship), ion storms ever without a base layover.
Judging by the shape the ship was in after its one known encounter, I think this is not a bad assumption...

The phenomenon was also encountered only once by our heroes, or by any other set of onscreen Trek heroes for that matter (indeed, most sets never met this specific phenomenon, only comparable ones by different names). Everything fits with it being rare indeed - thus warranting these near-suicidal sorties into the belly of the beast by a random starship in the name of science, even though starships might have much better things to do, and even though the Federation might be capable of building special ships or craft better equipped to deal with the storm studies. It just wouldn't do to send dedicated ships on a hunt: every vessel has to stand ready in case she is the one to get lucky and meet a storm.

Really, the only in-story element that calls for the storms not to be super-rare is the fact that Finney was counting on encountering one. But he had obviously spent years if not decades preparing for his revenge, and most of it might have been spent waiting for the perfect storm.

It seems most likely to me that the ion pod(s) are there to study ion storms and other ion-related phenomena but they aren't disposable.
This goes against a command chair button being dedicated to the very act of disposing, though.

Kirk should really have control over the deploying and retracting of this supposed recoverable pod, too, if he has control over its emergency scuttling...

Why can't this whole operation be automated, sparing the risk and exposure of a crewman?
Good question, and the idea of uncrewed deployment answers it. And since an ion storm study is a highly time-critical operation, such uncrewed deployment would rightfully call for priming of the system after probable years of dormancy, in a great hurry, and inside a storm.

This might explain how Finney got out in time without there being any record of it
I'm not sure this should be an issue for the Records Officer, though.

Also, the more elaborate we make the ion pod, the more "accountable" it becomes. Something forgotten in a lone corner of the ship for years at an end would call for assorted precautions if its very operation jeopardized lives. If it's just an automated piece of equipment to be jettisoned to do its job after an expert has checked that it still works and primed its experiments, then nobody is required to anxiously await for said expert to return, ready to offer assistance. After all, the expert has not really left the ship.

Timo Saloniemi
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Old October 14 2012, 08:50 PM   #29
Timo
Admiral
 
Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Nothing in the dialogue mentions or even suggests "preparation". Got a quote?
I just choose to interpret the applicable bits the right way.

"We'll need somebody in the pod for readings."

Not for taking the readings, but to facilitate the getting of readings by priming the system.

"Report to pod for reading on ion plates."

Clearly, the futuristic act of "reading on" primes the plates.

"Finney here, Captain. Ion readings in progress."

But other systems still need priming.

"Make it fast, Ben. I may have to go to Red Alert."

And that marks the point where we deploy and run, ready or not. Note that Kirk does not say anything even remotely like "I may have to jettison the pod".

Also, what was the pod going to do once jettisoned?
Study the storm, autonomously, with better odds of survival than a starship (and less at stake in case of failure) - while it lasts. Kirk was in a great hurry to get into the storm, suggesting it would evaporate or move away in a moment. Once that happens, they can go and look for the pod and get the results, physically or via telemetry. Standard tornado hunting stuff, that.

But, the episode made it clear that keeping the pod attached during an emergency would've destroyed the ship.
Nothing of the sort was ever stated. Instead, Kirk made clear that the storm was a threat to his ship, quite regardless of pods or other factors. And then he said that when the storm got worse still, he had to jettison the pod. Which is fully consistent with jettisoning being the climax of the mission, something Kirk was anxious to do because it would allow him to save his ship by sailing out of the storm.

The very reason that Kirk is on trial is because he is being blamed for jettisoning the ion pod before an emergency.
Nope, he's on trial because Finney is dead, and evidence suggests both that Kirk didn't give Finney a warning necessary for his survival, and that Kirk had a motive to hold back the warning and cause Finney's death.

There was a full-blown emergency underway all the time, with various alert statuses to indicate it. That Kirk jettisoned before pressing Red Alert would be a poor handling of the emergencies at hand, and could be interpreted variously as incompetence or malice - but everybody knew he would jettison sooner or later. That was assumed, inevitable, and no doubt the aim of the whole process.

Shaw is of course speaking out of her pretty ass: the ship was in danger already, per all witness statements. The ship suffered heavy damage, none of it ever attributed to the presence of the ion pod. But the prosecution would be motivated to use provocative expressions: Kirk looks more incompetent (or more damnably suspect) if he panics when there "is no emergency".

Spock: "It reports that the jettison button was pressed before the Red Alert."
Shaw: "In other words, it reports that Captain Kirk was reacting to an extreme emergency that did not then exist."
But of course it does not report that. It only reports that Captain Kirk did not believe in an extreme emergency yet, and thus didn't press the Red Alert button to express such belief.

Button pushes are the thing being judged in the trial. But button pushes do not relate to emergencies. Button pushes only relate to Kirk's assessment on whether there exists an emergency or not. If Kirk doesn't press Red Alert in time, Shaw can only accuse him of failing to notice or express that there is an emergency there; the emergency itself cannot be talked away by the silly woman.

Timo Saloniemi
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Old October 14 2012, 09:40 PM   #30
blssdwlf
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Re: exterior surface markings of Kirk's Enterprise

Timo wrote: View Post
Nothing in the dialogue mentions or even suggests "preparation". Got a quote?
I just choose to interpret the applicable bits the right way.
Yes your interpretation, but no dialogue. I'd buy into your interpretation if there was just a shred of dialogue support into the episode. However, there doesn't appear to be any.

Timo wrote: View Post
"We'll need somebody in the pod for readings."

Not for taking the readings, but to facilitate the getting of readings by priming the system.
He should've of said, "We'll need somebody to prep the pod for readings."

Timo wrote: View Post
"Report to pod for reading on ion plates."

Clearly, the futuristic act of "reading on" primes the plates.
He should've said, "Report to pod for readying the plates for launching."

Timo wrote: View Post
"Finney here, Captain. Ion readings in progress."

But other systems still need priming.
He should've said, "Finney here, Captain. Ion readings in progress. Ready to launch as soon as I get clear."

Timo wrote: View Post
"Make it fast, Ben. I may have to go to Red Alert."
Kirk should've said, "Finney, where's my damn ion pod!?"

Timo wrote: View Post
And that marks the point where we deploy and run, ready or not. Note that Kirk does not say anything even remotely like "I may have to jettison the pod".
And that is where Kirk is forced to jettison the pod, not deploy and run. If they could've fired an automated ion probe into the storm they would've. But since they have a guy manually taking readings indicate that they are unable to automate the process. And with that, there would be no way a jettisoned ion pod could've gathered and saved any data for later retrieval or even send telemetry to the ship.

Timo wrote: View Post
Nothing of the sort was ever stated. Instead, Kirk made clear that the storm was a threat to his ship, quite regardless of pods or other factors. And then he said that when the storm got worse still, he had to jettison the pod. Which is fully consistent with jettisoning being the climax of the mission, something Kirk was anxious to do because it would allow him to save his ship by sailing out of the storm.
That's not true. If the storm did not get worse, they would've kept the pod and sailed out of it. Would the ship have been damaged, probably. Would the ship have been destroyed? No.

But with the storm worsening, the pod was the danger and it had to be jettisoned. That was the emergency as stated in the episode. Jettisoning it saved the ship. Was the ship still damaged? Yes, but that was to be expected.


Timo wrote: View Post
The very reason that Kirk is on trial is because he is being blamed for jettisoning the ion pod before an emergency.
Nope, he's on trial because Finney is dead, and evidence suggests both that Kirk didn't give Finney a warning necessary for his survival, and that Kirk had a motive to hold back the warning and cause Finney's death.
That's not what the episode dialogue states. He's on trial because Kirk perjured himself and jettisoned the pod in a non-emergency situation, which caused Finney's death.
STONE: Then, Captain, I must presume you've committed willful perjury.This extract from your computer log says you jettisoned the pod before going to Red Alert. Consider yourself confined to the base. Official inquiry will determine whether a general court martial is in order.

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