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Star Trek - Original Series The one that started it all...

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Old February 10 2012, 07:21 PM   #31
Mysterion
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

nightwind1 wrote: View Post
Mysterion wrote: View Post
I've just written off to them only having the one corridor set and gotten on with my life. Of course engineering is in the secondary hull.
Nope. I've always gone with Fraz Joseph's layout, with Engineering at the aft end of the Primary Hull.
Sorry but, IMO, FJs layout of the Constitution Class starship creates amny more problems than it solves.
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Old February 10 2012, 09:07 PM   #32
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways



Those Enterprise corridors are just filled with curves!
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Old February 10 2012, 11:20 PM   #33
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

A beaker full of death wrote: View Post
It's funny. When I studied admiralty law the professor was this old salt with one arm.
Let me guess -- his other arm was bitten off by a shark. Or a big white whale.

He told about how land lubbers would come aboard ship well versed in port vs. starboard, and the captain would just say "turn right!"
Left and right full (or X degrees) rudder have been the standard commands since World War I.

And sailors don't learn to "box the compass" anymore either.

GSchnitzer wrote: View Post
Those Enterprise corridors are just filled with curves!
Couldn't resist the obvious, eh?
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Old February 11 2012, 01:55 AM   #34
A beaker full of death
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

scotpens wrote: View Post
A beaker full of death wrote: View Post
It's funny. When I studied admiralty law the professor was this old salt with one arm.
Let me guess -- his other arm was bitten off by a shark. Or a big white whale.
Did I mention the eyepatch?

ok, but the arm thing is true. I always assumed it was the war.

EDIT: Well, damn. I just googled him and found his obit.
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...52C0A96E9C8B63
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Old February 11 2012, 12:55 PM   #35
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Left and right full (or X degrees) rudder have been the standard commands since World War I.
...Replacing "starboard" and "port", respectively. And that's not an error.

Realistically, command language in the 3D battlescape of Star Trek should have room for more directional commands than just "right/left" and/or "port/starboard". Seagoing ships have just two degrees of freedom: left/right and forward/aft; "port/starboard" is currently reserved for bearings rather than maneuvers. But a spacegoing ship of the Star Trek type would have significantly more degrees of freedom, including turns to right/left, translations to right/left, turns to up/down, translations to up/down, and then translations forward/aft, and then roll.

It's thus very good that ST6 told us that they at least use "right/left" in parallel with "port/starboard"...

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Old February 11 2012, 08:22 PM   #36
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Timo wrote: View Post
Left and right full (or X degrees) rudder have been the standard commands since World War I.
...Replacing "starboard" and "port", respectively. And that's not an error.

Realistically, command language in the 3D battlescape of Star Trek should have room for more directional commands than just "right/left" and/or "port/starboard". Seagoing ships have just two degrees of freedom: left/right and forward/aft; "port/starboard" is currently reserved for bearings rather than maneuvers. But a spacegoing ship of the Star Trek type would have significantly more degrees of freedom, including turns to right/left, translations to right/left, turns to up/down, translations to up/down, and then translations forward/aft, and then roll.

It's thus very good that ST6 told us that they at least use "right/left" in parallel with "port/starboard"...

Timo Saloniemi
Basically they do, hence the "mark" between so many degrees up or down and right/left etc. But still, I agree, the reference system should have been worked out a little more thoroughly.
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Old February 11 2012, 08:33 PM   #37
scotpens
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Timo wrote: View Post
Left and right full (or X degrees) rudder have been the standard commands since World War I.
...Replacing "starboard" and "port", respectively. And that's not an error.
That was true in the days of sail, when steering commands were tiller commands.



To come full starboard (right) the tiller would be swung as far as possible to the port (left), opposite of the intended direction. On a ship with a modern helm, the wheel (or more recently, the joystick) is turned in the intended direction of travel.
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Old February 12 2012, 11:12 AM   #38
Timo
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

...It's just that the Royal Navy didn't quite come to grips with this until some time after WWI!

Which makes life all the more interesting for historians comparing German and British naval logs against each other in retracing the battles; it's best to hold a mirror to one set of logs. It might also have caused complications in convoy, because British military and merchant sailors switched between terminologies at different times after the war.

Another thing differentiating the sea from the outer space is that the horizon at least provides one absolute. If nothing else, it prevents one ship's port from being another's starboard when the two have the same heading; no such comfort for ships in space, with their ability to roll at will!

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Old February 16 2012, 08:50 AM   #39
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Mysterion wrote: View Post
I've just written off to them only having the one corridor set and gotten on with my life. Of course engineering is in the secondary hull.

Your position on this is dangerous, and you're on the verge of letting reality bleed into our Trek-universe discussions.

Stop. Now. Please. Before some of the less-entrenched of us are affected by your thinking, and they end up sliding away to becoming Babylon 5 fans or something.
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Old June 2 2013, 12:37 AM   #40
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

GSchnitzer wrote: View Post


Those Enterprise corridors are just filled with curves!
Awesome! I was just looking for a Classic Corridor shot as reference to help design a 'Captain's Announcement' scene for my little film ''Beyond Antares'' and it turned out to be posted by the guys that inspired my entire project to start with! (Phase II crew) ;~) (I clicked on it in Google images & it brought me to familiar ground)!
This is my initial camera placement before going to look for reference;

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Old June 2 2013, 03:26 AM   #41
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

The thing is that nobody even seems to consider is that there is no up or down in space. The fact that the engineering corridors are circular could be because they are actually perpendicular to the plan of the saucer section. With artificial gravity it would make no difference. The circular sections could be because those corridors are going around the circumference around the secondary hull.

Is that too far out?
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Old June 2 2013, 03:41 AM   #42
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

Conforming to the indentation labeled "cove" on FJ's sheet 3, on the aft underside of the secondary hull, might be a plausible reason for curved hallways, at least under and around the shuttlecraft hangar (cf. The Doomsday Machine).
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Old June 2 2013, 03:48 AM   #43
scotpens
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

feek61 wrote: View Post
. . . With artificial gravity it would make no difference. The circular sections could be because those corridors are going around the circumference around the secondary hull. Is that too far out?
With artificial gravity, I suppose anything is possible.

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Old June 2 2013, 06:50 AM   #44
Maurice
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

They had a standing set that they didn't think too much about. The Jupiter 2 isn't big enough to contain anything like its lower deck (let alone the engine room), and, news flash, the Brady Bunch set doesn't fit into the house exterior shown.

It's just TV for pete's sake.
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Old June 2 2013, 01:24 PM   #45
aridas sofia
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Re: Engineering's curved hallways

^This. If I were to make an attempt to create an interior that fit the exterior, I'd probably use the TOS engineering room as an impulse engine room. Then I'd use Phase II and TMP to guide me in creating a space with a reactor and clear shafts extending towards the nacelles. It would probably be a redress of the impulse engineering set- remove the back "trapezoidal" wall and add the long "TMP" shaft that snaked along the secondary hull's upper spine to the pylons. A forced perspective set. I'd use TAS as a guide for the main reactor in the engineering room.

Maybe the impulse room would look more like the one level, early engine room and warp engineering would look like the later two level space.

And if I wanted to show someone entering warp engineering, I'd slap a sign saying "WARP ENGINEERING" on a door at the end of the straight corridor.

The fact something like this was not done is likely attributable not just to lack of time and money. Whatever time and money they had could either be spent on a second engineering space or on other unseen parts of the ship that might have roles wholly unrelated to engineering, to allow story ideas to be explored that otherwise could not.

Another reason? Confusion. The fact that the ship has propulsion systems for faster than light and slower than light and that one might be a fusion rocket while the other bends spacetime... cool for geeks but probably not of much use to telling stories meant to appeal to a mainstream audience.

However, if you want to speculate about whether there is an engine room in the saucer of an idealized Enterprise... of course there is. If there is an engine there an engine room is there as well. Can they control the warp drive from this impulse engineering room? Sure! Why not?
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