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Go Back   The Trek BBS > Misc. Star Trek > Trek Tech

Trek Tech Pass me the quantum flux regulator, will you?

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Old April 24 2011, 04:32 PM   #1
SicOne
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Location: Omaha, NE
Romulan warbird quantum singularity

If the Romulan warbirds are powered by quantum singularities, what happens to said singularities if the ship is destroyed? Does it leave a tiny black hole where the ship once was? Is it, therefore, a healthy idea to destroy a Romulan ship that is orbiting a planet that you want to keep around for awhile? I mean, granted, it might not suck up the planet like Vulcan got sucked up from within in the last "Star Trek" movie, but it would cause a significant problem that would be very tricky, if not impossible, to resolve. Has this been addressed on the board, or in a novel?
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Old April 24 2011, 06:56 PM   #2
Crazy Eddie
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Re: Romulan warbird quantum singularity

The singularity is artificial, probably produced by an artificial gravity generator or something. Probably it is setup in such a way that it takes less power to generate the gravity field than the reactor core produces, so the ship can operate indefinitely as long as it has a steady supply of fuel.
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Old April 24 2011, 09:29 PM   #3
Ronald Held
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Re: Romulan warbird quantum singularity

Why isn't it a mini black hole, such that if it is not fed matter, it starts to radiate Hawking radiation until it no longer exist?
I presume there was no canonical data on mass?
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Old April 24 2011, 11:50 PM   #4
Tiberius
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Re: Romulan warbird quantum singularity

A small singularity, if not maintained, would tend to evaporate after a time.

However, I love the idea of them blowing up a Romulan ship, and then after a brief explosion, it implodes and collapses in on itself!
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Old April 25 2011, 12:16 AM   #5
C.E. Evans
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Re: Romulan warbird quantum singularity

If it's a micro singularity, its collapse may be no more than what happens with a warp core breach perhaps. A big bang that blows the ship apart, but isn't around long enough to do anything else.
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Old April 25 2011, 10:52 PM   #6
publiusr
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Re: Romulan warbird quantum singularity

Well, now we know where all the decalitium red matter talk came from

Let's just hope it doesn't make like EVENT HORIZON and open up to something unspeakable. Different process we will say.
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Old April 26 2011, 05:33 AM   #7
Crazy Eddie
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Re: Romulan warbird quantum singularity

Ronald Held wrote: View Post
Why isn't it a mini black hole, such that if it is not fed matter, it starts to radiate Hawking radiation until it no longer exist?
I presume there was no canonical data on mass?
Because it's never called a "mini-black hole," it's called a "forced quantum singularity" and is further described as an "artificial gravity well" whose properties are subtly but meaningfully different from real ones. I presume--as I did above--that this is because there's no ACTUAL singularity at the center of the core, just a powerful field of artificial gravity being maintained electrically using the surplus energy from the core itself.
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