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Old July 9 2012, 04:32 AM   #3781
sidious618
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

The Dark Knight is one of the most rewatchable films I've seen. I've never rewatched any other comic book film that I can recall.
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Old July 9 2012, 04:41 AM   #3782
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

RoJoHen wrote: View Post
I can't sit through TDK in one sitting without falling asleep.
The new one is even longer. I presume there'll be people sleeping in the theater like there were in Inception.
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Old July 9 2012, 05:34 AM   #3783
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

RoJoHen wrote: View Post
I can't sit through TDK in one sitting without falling asleep. I tried to watch it a couple weeks ago in preparation for the new film, and it took me 3 days to finish it. I don't find either of Nolan's Batman films rewatchable at all. To each their own, I suppose.
Totally agreed. And as was pointed out by someone upthread, the scenes that are drawn out and suspensful on the first watch simply become long upon repeat viewings.
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Old July 9 2012, 07:54 AM   #3784
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

look here!
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Old July 9 2012, 02:10 PM   #3785
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Hopefully these reviewers are not just a bunch of paid Warner shills...
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Old July 9 2012, 04:48 PM   #3786
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

You know, I'm sure the movie will rock.... but this idea of crime in Gotham being virtually wiped out for 8 years still seems awfully odd to me.

This isn't supposed to be Seattle or something, that just had a small little outbreak of crime for a while. It's freakin Gotham City-- the most wretched, corrupt, and crime-filled city in the entire DC universe. I can't really see how Harvey's death would possibly change that, or affect the behavior of all the petty, desperate, small-time criminals out there.

In fact, in the comics anytime Batman was out of the picture the crime rate would shoot through the roof.

I'm hoping Nolan will do a proper job explaining how this all happened, and it's not something we have to "just accept" from the outset.
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Old July 9 2012, 05:02 PM   #3787
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

davejames wrote: View Post
You know, I'm sure the movie will rock.... but this idea of crime in Gotham being virtually wiped out for 8 years still seems awfully odd to me.

This isn't supposed to be Seattle or something, that just had a small little outbreak of crime for a while. It's freakin Gotham City-- the most wretched, corrupt, and crime-filled city in the entire DC universe. I can't really see how Harvey's death would possibly change that, or affect the behavior of all the petty, desperate, small-time criminals out there.

In fact, in the comics anytime Batman was out of the picture the crime rate would shoot through the roof.

I'm hoping Nolan will do a proper job explaining how this all happened, and it's not something we have to "just accept" from the outset.
What's so hard to understand? Dent basically murdered the biggest criminals in Gotham (which I believe Batman wound up taking the "credit" for, so as not to tarnish Dent's image), Commissioner Gordon likely got a free hand to "clean up the city," and all you really have to do to eliminate organized crime is make it an unprofitable enterprise. With organized crime gone, you're left with the more petty stuff, which a typical police force can handle well. It's conceivable that they'd end up with a violent crime rate more typical of a New England city, rather than a Southern one--that is to say, very low.
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Old July 9 2012, 05:19 PM   #3788
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Robert Maxwell wrote: View Post
davejames wrote: View Post
You know, I'm sure the movie will rock.... but this idea of crime in Gotham being virtually wiped out for 8 years still seems awfully odd to me.

This isn't supposed to be Seattle or something, that just had a small little outbreak of crime for a while. It's freakin Gotham City-- the most wretched, corrupt, and crime-filled city in the entire DC universe. I can't really see how Harvey's death would possibly change that, or affect the behavior of all the petty, desperate, small-time criminals out there.

In fact, in the comics anytime Batman was out of the picture the crime rate would shoot through the roof.

I'm hoping Nolan will do a proper job explaining how this all happened, and it's not something we have to "just accept" from the outset.
What's so hard to understand? Dent basically murdered the biggest criminals in Gotham (which I believe Batman wound up taking the "credit" for, so as not to tarnish Dent's image), Commissioner Gordon likely got a free hand to "clean up the city," and all you really have to do to eliminate organized crime is make it an unprofitable enterprise. With organized crime gone, you're left with the more petty stuff, which a typical police force can handle well. It's conceivable that they'd end up with a violent crime rate more typical of a New England city, rather than a Southern one--that is to say, very low.
And with no Batman maybe real loonies aren't drawn to Gotham and go elswhere.
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Old July 9 2012, 05:38 PM   #3789
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Robert Maxwell wrote: View Post
davejames wrote: View Post
You know, I'm sure the movie will rock.... but this idea of crime in Gotham being virtually wiped out for 8 years still seems awfully odd to me.

This isn't supposed to be Seattle or something, that just had a small little outbreak of crime for a while. It's freakin Gotham City-- the most wretched, corrupt, and crime-filled city in the entire DC universe. I can't really see how Harvey's death would possibly change that, or affect the behavior of all the petty, desperate, small-time criminals out there.

In fact, in the comics anytime Batman was out of the picture the crime rate would shoot through the roof.

I'm hoping Nolan will do a proper job explaining how this all happened, and it's not something we have to "just accept" from the outset.
What's so hard to understand? Dent basically murdered the biggest criminals in Gotham (which I believe Batman wound up taking the "credit" for, so as not to tarnish Dent's image), Commissioner Gordon likely got a free hand to "clean up the city," and all you really have to do to eliminate organized crime is make it an unprofitable enterprise. With organized crime gone, you're left with the more petty stuff, which a typical police force can handle well. It's conceivable that they'd end up with a violent crime rate more typical of a New England city, rather than a Southern one--that is to say, very low.
If you add that Nolan insists that an idealized hero is needed to inspire the worthless masses, I'd say you've correctly explained the thematic climax of DKR, and how it continues into this movie. It's a lot of foolishness. Killing the leaders doesn't stop institutions, and organized crime is an institution. Corruption takes place in nice quiet offices and over dinner and drinks and is a part of politics. Vigilantism doesn't touch that. The notion that the police could clean up crime if they had a free hand verges on fascist thinking. The real source of law and order is a healthy society and the police are just one part of that, not the Scourge of God striking down the Mob that always lurks in the proletariat. And "terrorism" is no more a legitimate threat to society than "chaos" as a person. It's a bugaboo, a lurid fantasy, a mean-spirited nightmare projected onto a scapegoat.

Look, you can try to suspend disbelief for this BS, but there are limits. Piling it higher and deeper doesn't credential it as smart.
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Old July 9 2012, 05:43 PM   #3790
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Ignoring Heath Ledgers death.

I'm surprised Joker didn't break out a few hours/weeks after events of "The Dark Knight"

He's supposed to be Batman greatest foe but apparently he didn't cause anymore trouble for 8 years.
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Old July 9 2012, 06:24 PM   #3791
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Marc wrote: View Post
Robert Maxwell wrote: View Post
What's so hard to understand? Dent basically murdered the biggest criminals in Gotham (which I believe Batman wound up taking the "credit" for, so as not to tarnish Dent's image), Commissioner Gordon likely got a free hand to "clean up the city," and all you really have to do to eliminate organized crime is make it an unprofitable enterprise. With organized crime gone, you're left with the more petty stuff, which a typical police force can handle well. It's conceivable that they'd end up with a violent crime rate more typical of a New England city, rather than a Southern one--that is to say, very low.
And with no Batman maybe real loonies aren't drawn to Gotham and go elswhere.
Yeah with Batman gone I can understand there not being a bunch of crazy supervillains running around, but the image of Gotham painted in the first two movies was one where corruption was everywhere and criminal activity was off the charts.

Unless they was also able to magically wipe out poverty and drug addiction, and remove every corrupt polititian or judge or cop in the city, it's hard to imagine new crime bosses not rising up immediately to take advantage of that market.
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Old July 9 2012, 07:33 PM   #3792
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

stj wrote: View Post
Robert Maxwell wrote: View Post
davejames wrote: View Post
You know, I'm sure the movie will rock.... but this idea of crime in Gotham being virtually wiped out for 8 years still seems awfully odd to me.

This isn't supposed to be Seattle or something, that just had a small little outbreak of crime for a while. It's freakin Gotham City-- the most wretched, corrupt, and crime-filled city in the entire DC universe. I can't really see how Harvey's death would possibly change that, or affect the behavior of all the petty, desperate, small-time criminals out there.

In fact, in the comics anytime Batman was out of the picture the crime rate would shoot through the roof.

I'm hoping Nolan will do a proper job explaining how this all happened, and it's not something we have to "just accept" from the outset.
What's so hard to understand? Dent basically murdered the biggest criminals in Gotham (which I believe Batman wound up taking the "credit" for, so as not to tarnish Dent's image), Commissioner Gordon likely got a free hand to "clean up the city," and all you really have to do to eliminate organized crime is make it an unprofitable enterprise. With organized crime gone, you're left with the more petty stuff, which a typical police force can handle well. It's conceivable that they'd end up with a violent crime rate more typical of a New England city, rather than a Southern one--that is to say, very low.
If you add that Nolan insists that an idealized hero is needed to inspire the worthless masses, I'd say you've correctly explained the thematic climax of DKR, and how it continues into this movie. It's a lot of foolishness. Killing the leaders doesn't stop institutions, and organized crime is an institution. Corruption takes place in nice quiet offices and over dinner and drinks and is a part of politics. Vigilantism doesn't touch that. The notion that the police could clean up crime if they had a free hand verges on fascist thinking. The real source of law and order is a healthy society and the police are just one part of that, not the Scourge of God striking down the Mob that always lurks in the proletariat. And "terrorism" is no more a legitimate threat to society than "chaos" as a person. It's a bugaboo, a lurid fantasy, a mean-spirited nightmare projected onto a scapegoat.

Look, you can try to suspend disbelief for this BS, but there are limits. Piling it higher and deeper doesn't credential it as smart.
Well, I was trying to explain it within the thematic framework established by TDK. Obviously, nothing is that simple and straightforward in the real world. You have rightly pointed out that Nolan's Gotham isn't nearly as realistic and clever as it thinks it is. It just has the veneer of gritty realism to lend itself greater credibility as a "realistic" portrayal of superhero vigilantism.

I liked BB and TDK, although I found both to be overlong (typical of Nolan's films) and I don't think the praise heaped on them is entirely deserved. But I expect TDKR to be fun, nonetheless.
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Old July 9 2012, 07:56 PM   #3793
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Robert Maxwell wrote: View Post
stj wrote: View Post
Robert Maxwell wrote: View Post

What's so hard to understand? Dent basically murdered the biggest criminals in Gotham (which I believe Batman wound up taking the "credit" for, so as not to tarnish Dent's image), Commissioner Gordon likely got a free hand to "clean up the city," and all you really have to do to eliminate organized crime is make it an unprofitable enterprise. With organized crime gone, you're left with the more petty stuff, which a typical police force can handle well. It's conceivable that they'd end up with a violent crime rate more typical of a New England city, rather than a Southern one--that is to say, very low.
If you add that Nolan insists that an idealized hero is needed to inspire the worthless masses, I'd say you've correctly explained the thematic climax of DKR, and how it continues into this movie. It's a lot of foolishness. Killing the leaders doesn't stop institutions, and organized crime is an institution. Corruption takes place in nice quiet offices and over dinner and drinks and is a part of politics. Vigilantism doesn't touch that. The notion that the police could clean up crime if they had a free hand verges on fascist thinking. The real source of law and order is a healthy society and the police are just one part of that, not the Scourge of God striking down the Mob that always lurks in the proletariat. And "terrorism" is no more a legitimate threat to society than "chaos" as a person. It's a bugaboo, a lurid fantasy, a mean-spirited nightmare projected onto a scapegoat.

Look, you can try to suspend disbelief for this BS, but there are limits. Piling it higher and deeper doesn't credential it as smart.
Well, I was trying to explain it within the thematic framework established by TDK. Obviously, nothing is that simple and straightforward in the real world. You have rightly pointed out that Nolan's Gotham isn't nearly as realistic and clever as it thinks it is. It just has the veneer of gritty realism to lend itself greater credibility as a "realistic" portrayal of superhero vigilantism.

.
I think Nolan's Batman films have a lot of Capraesque idealism in them. Think... Mr. Wayne Goes to Gotham, but grittier. Sure the scenario Nolan's laid out for TDKR is pretty naive in real world terms but... Goddamn, I wish life was like a Frank Capra picture!

But then... I think that's the point.
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Old July 9 2012, 08:06 PM   #3794
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Gotham doesn't have to become a paradise after TDK. Anything less than what it was would be considered a huge improvement. One could say the overall situation simply became more tolerable. One could still have a level of street crime and corruption without the city going completely to hell. Indeed a lot of otherwise decent cities in the real world are pretty much like that.

Gotham always struck me as something like Chicago or New York of the 1920s. And that mightn't be far from what was originally intended when Bob Kane got started with all this. The 1920s and '30s were a notorious time for crime and corruption, and a time when gangsters were even romanticized. Or perhaps think of New York in the 1970s. Any movement away from that kind of situation and you'd think you were in a garden of paradise in comparison.
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Old July 9 2012, 08:27 PM   #3795
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Re: The Dark Knight Rises Anticipation Station

Robert Maxwell wrote: View Post
I liked BB and TDK, although I found both to be overlong (typical of Nolan's films) and I don't think the praise heaped on them is entirely deserved.
His first three films (Following, Memento, and Insomnia) all clock in at under two hours, and The Prestige is just ten minutes over that mark.

As he's been given more money to spend, though, his films seem to have gotten longer and longer. I wish he'd tackle a smaller project again; he really seemed to shine on that scale. The Prestige is really the only film to come close to that, and it's no surprise to me that it's the shortest of his last five films.

I don't mean to suggest that I dislike his more recent output, but I do miss early Nolan.
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