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Deep Space Nine What We Left Behind, we will always have here.

View Poll Results: Bajorans - do you like them or not?
Bajorans are great, a very well developed race/culture, I enjoyed plots that focused on them 36 61.02%
Bajorans are dull/annoying, I hated plots that focused on them 9 15.25%
They are so-so, I have no strong feelings on the matter 14 23.73%
Voters: 59. You may not vote on this poll

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Old April 15 2010, 04:24 PM   #1
DevilEyes
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Bajorans - yay or nay

Quite a few people on this forum seem to have a strong dislike for Bajorans as a whole and think that they're boring or "annoying". Some other people, yours truly included, strongly disagree. Recently, on the "Unpopular opinions" thread in the General Trek forum, someone posted that their "unpopular opinion" is that Bajorans are annoying and that this stopped him/her from getting into DS9. Which is kind of funny, since I posted my unpopular opinion earlier - that I think Bajorans are one of the best developed races in Trek. So... I wonder whose unpopular opinion is more unpopular? Let's finally find out how the DS9 fans on Trek BBS feel.
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Old April 15 2010, 04:43 PM   #2
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

I voted for the third option. I like Bajorans... in interaction with Cardassians.
Bajorans by themselves... they are ...ok, but not that interessting.

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Old April 15 2010, 05:01 PM   #3
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

I always found the Bajorans interesting; they were reasonably well developed and were certainly a fully realized culture, with various political and theological factions (though some of these needed more exploration, in my opinion). They were three-dimensional, too. It is true, though, that they were at their best when paired with the Cardassians- although episodes like the season two opening trilogy did a good job of making them interesting in their own right. I just wish we had seen more of Bajor, to be honest. When we did have focus on their internal politics, etc, it seemed "realistic" enough to me, which I suppose is partly why I like them.
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Old April 15 2010, 05:49 PM   #4
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

Bajorans are Jews, Cardassians are Nazis--what would happen if they were forced to work together? Boring, boring, boring.
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Old April 15 2010, 06:54 PM   #5
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

The episodes focusing on Bajoran culture and religion are probably my favourite of the series. They were always consistently well-done and involving. I wish they hadn't got so lost in the shuffle once the Dominion came about, to the point that the whole starting purpose of the series (to get Bajor into the federation) never even happened at the end of the seven years.
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Old April 15 2010, 07:25 PM   #6
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

I really didn't enjoy them on any level and found most episodes about them and most explorations of their culture irritating. I'm glad the Dominon War shifted the focus away from them. From the silly look (make-up) to their characters to their over-the-top religion/victim complex (understandable, but still grating), everything about them bugged me. Kira had some good moments and I really liked the Bajoran girl in "Lower Decks", but whenever I enjoyed those characters, it was always for qualities that had nothing to do with them being Bajoran, so it's more like I liked them despite the fact that they were Bahoran.
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Old April 15 2010, 10:11 PM   #7
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

Zameaze wrote: View Post
Bajorans are Jews, Cardassians are Nazis-.
First of all, Cardassians can't be "Nazis", because Nazis were a political party, not a race, nation or ethnic group, while Cardassians are definitely a species/race of humanoids, not an ideology or a party.

But if you mean that "Bajorans are Jews, Cardassians are Germans" - that only works for t "Duet". There are many reasons why it doesn't work for the entire show, certainly not in the literal way you seem to think.

For starters:
- Jews did not have their own country that the Germans occupied.
- Bajorans did not live as a (hated) minority among Cardassians.
- In Nazi Germany, Jews did not have the luxury of being considered just an inferior race that should live under German control and accept superior German culture. Jews were considered a vermin that should be exterminated.
- Cardassians wanted to exploit Bajor and use Bajorans as slaves, but Cardassian Union didn't have a Final Solution policy against Bajorans, even if some commanders - like Dar-heel - seemed to have a pathological hatred for Bajorans. If there was a policy of mass scale genocide, you can be sure that Bajoran victims would amount to a lot more than 10 million on the entire planet (out of billions of people) over the period of 50 years - even with 20th century technology, let alone with superior 24th century technology. We've seen in DS9 itself what happens when an interplanetary power wants to commit genocide - the Dominion managed to kill over 600 million Cardassians in... what was it, a few weeks?
- There's no way that Jews could have lived in the Third Reich for 50 years and suffered less than 1% of casualties.
- There's no way that a Nazi official would and could never have had a semi-public or public Jewish mistress, or have her live a life of relative comfort and luxury - not if it was known that she was Jewish. Sexual relations between "Aryans" and Jews were officially forbidden in the Third Reich. As was giving a Jewish family food or medicine.
- There was armed Jewish resistance, but it wasn't exactly the main reason or one of the main reasons that Germany was defeated.

There can be - and have been - many real world comparisons to the Bajor/Cardassian situation, but none of them work 100% that you can say "Bajorans are this, and Cardassians are this." I'd say that the best real world parallel is colonialism. Dukat's attitude is certainly very much "White Man's Burden" (or should that be "Grey Man's Burden" ).
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Old April 15 2010, 10:35 PM   #8
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

Zameaze wrote: View Post
Bajorans are Jews, Cardassians are Nazis--what would happen if they were forced to work together? Boring, boring, boring.

There's a term for this (literally); it's called dramatic conflict and it is what makes for good fiction when executed properly. I'm not sure how, exactly, that is anything but antithetical to the word 'boring.'

I voted "Yay," to the Bajorans. While I found certain Bajorans to be pompous and arrogant, others to be outright racist, and some to be seemingly pure evil... that is the point; they weren't a stereotype of some former human civilization, exaggerated and wrapped in alien makeup. The Bajoran characters were varied. We had people like Bareil, who was politically motivated and very dedicated to his people. Then we had people like Opaka who was extremely spiritual. We had Winn, who was wholly corrupt but perhaps redeemable (during the last seconds of her life), and then characters like Kira who were a little bit of all of them (save for Winn of course.) The Bajorans were varied. They weren't all "Honor, honor, honor," "Money, Money, Money," "Logic, Logic, Logic." Sure, they were spiritual, but that wasn't the only thing ever defined about them and wasn't what identified a Bajoran. Even their spirituality was split and varied (as they showed not only one religion but two.)

So while I wasn't exactly in love with every Bajoran character I thought their execution (the story that was told of them) was spot on with how a species should be fleshed out on a show like Star Trek.


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Old April 15 2010, 10:51 PM   #9
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

DevilEyes wrote: View Post
There can be - and have been - many real world comparisons to the Bajor/Cardassian situation, but none of them work 100% that you can say "Bajorans are this, and Cardassians are this."
And here are some of the comparisons made about Bajorans and the occupation (I had to put this in a separate post, since it was too long):

The Occupation of Bajor bears a number of similarities to real-world events. When the Occupation, as well as the Bajorans themselves, were introduced in TNG: "Ensign Ro", the Bajorans appeared to be refugees who fled their homes and lived in refugee camps, giving rise to the belief that they were intended to resemble Palestinians who had once lived in Israel. The claim that the Occupation had lasted approximately forty years would also be consistent with the period between Israel's independence (1948) and the airing of the episode (1991). As the race was developed in later episodes, however, this allusion seemed to fade.

The Occupation, as portrayed in later episodes, appears to have been more a metaphor for the aggression of Germany and Japan in the first half of the 20th century. Although fans often liken the Occupation to Nazi Germany's treatment of Jews, there does not appear to have been a concerted effort – with the exception of individuals such as Gul Darhe'el (DS9: "Duet") – to exterminate the race. Rather, the Cardassians simply viewed themselves as superior, believing the Occupation was necessary for the good of the Cardassian Empire.

One could thus argue the Occupation was more akin to Japan's occupation of Korea and particularly China. For example, Marritza's vivid description of how Darhe'el's men murdered the Bajoran workers is reminiscent of both Nazi Germany and the Japanese Empire, but his statements about "need[ing] your resources" and Dukat's description of the brutal massacres as "alleged improprieties" point strongly at Japan. The brutal treatment of other races under Japanese rule around the time of World War II and subsequent denial of events like the "Rape of Nanking" (the brutality of which is disputed in Japan to this day, although there was also a large degree of Holocaust denial in post-World War II Germany) bear many similarities to the way military leaders on Cardassia were celebrated for their deeds during the Occupation while most civilians were oblivious to its true nature.

Another World War II parallel one might make is to the Soviet occupation of the Baltic states in 1940–41 and 1944–91. Superficially, of course, the length of these occupations is roughly the same as that of Bajor, but the parallels go much further. For instance, the resistance movements of the Baltic states were active far beyond the end of World War II. Known as the Forest Brothers, they continued to engage the Soviet occupation forces well into the 1950s. The tactics of these actions – sabotage, assassinations of officials, and guerrilla warfare in the countryside – bears a striking resemblance to the Bajoran Resistance. However, perhaps the most interesting parallel is that of post-occupation events. Just like Bajor sought to enter into the Federation, the Baltic states were quick and eager to join NATO as a security measure against renewed aggression from Russia. And just like the discovery of the Bajoran wormhole created a geopolitical and strategic hot spot, so are the Baltic states strategically important to Russia, as their sovereignty severely limits Russian access to the Baltic Sea. Parallels to the ever present hostility between Bajorans and Cardassians even after the Occupation can also be made, considering the harsh laws of citizenship and official language, adopted by the post-occupation Baltic states.

Additionally, the Occupation bears some resemblances to European colonialism. Dukat's recollection of the Occupation in DS9: "Waltz" is heavily reminiscent of Kipling's "The White Man's Burden": "They couldn't see that if they had only chosen to cooperate with us, we could've turned their world into a paradise. ... We did not choose to be the superior race, fate handed us our role. The d'jarra caste system (DS9: "Accession") also brings to mind British occupation of India (British Raj). Like Bajor, India had a strict caste system prior to British arrival, and like the Bajorans, the Indian people officially abolished the system once colonial rule was ended]
http://memory-alpha.org/en/wiki/Talk...ation_of_Bajor


Because the show always prioritized its internal universe over real-world parallels, it's impossible to pin Deep Space Nine down to a single interpretation. "The Darkness and the Light" is almost certainly recalling the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but in "Duet," the occupation is likened to the Holocaust, with Kira's interrogation of a suspected war criminal recalling similar interrogations of former Nazis in the 50s and 60s. In "Past Prologue," meanwhile, the strained relationship between extreme and less-extreme resistance groups recalls the situation in Northern Ireland. From the Cardassian point of view, the occupation of Bajor has parallels with the American presence in Vietnam, especially when it comes to Ziyal's difficult situation as a mixed-race child. On the other hand, Cardassian attitudes toward the Bajoran's have the hint of colonialism about them, and most particularly of Apartheid, and I think there's an argument to be made that Dukat's fraught relationship with the Bajorans is reminiscent of the slave-owner, who hates his slaves because he sees hatred in their eyes and knows that he deserves it, and punishes them for his depravity. The Vedek who kills herself in "Rocks and Shoals" to protest the Dominion's occupation of Bajor is probably a reference to the self-immolating monks in Tibet, and the notion of 'comfort women' for the Cardassian occupiers, which is introduced in "Wrongs Darker Than Death or Night," as well as the Bajorans' disdain for them, is probably derived from similar attitudes during Nazi occupation of European countries, and in fact that entire episode has undertones of Vichy France. And then there are episodes, like "Cardassians," which tell stories that could never have occurred have on Earth, but are entirely organic to the show's setting.

The result of Deep Space Nine's broad spectrum of political references is not merely to strengthen the show's fictional setting, but to render it universal and extend its relevance, so that a show written in the early to mid-nineties still has something important to say about the present-day political landscape, in spite of the upheavals it has undergone over the last decade.
http://www.indopedia.org/Star_Trek:_...pace_Nine.html

The most prominent theme in the series is that of the deeply religious Bajoran people attempting to rebuild their world and their economy after years of oppression from Cardassia. The relationship between the Bajorans and the Cardassians is intentionally portrayed much like the relationship between the Slavic people and Nazi Germany; the Cardassians had put the Bajorans to work in forced slave labor camps under terrible conditions, killed them with impunity, and express regret that their actions aren't recognized as being for the good of Bajor. Deep Space Nine's first officer, Kira Nerys, was formerly an underground resistance leader responsible for many acts of sabotage and subversion and is required in her new role to learn diplomacy and patience.

The relationship between the Cardassians and the Bajorans can also be regarded as colonial in nature. Much like in Kipling's The White Man's Burden, the Cardassians believed themselves to be both technologically and culturally superior. According to Dukat, at the time of first contact, Cardassia was at least 400 years ahead of Bajor in every way. The Cardassians strip-mined Bajor and instituted forced labor camps under the guise of civilizing a lesser people. Guerilla tactics by Bajoran fighters led to the removal of their colonial shackles in the same way that many colonies gained their independence in the 1960s and 1970s.
http://wrongquestions.blogspot.com/2...v-looking.html

Note also that the TNG portrayal of the Bajorans is pretty much the closest thing I can think of to a mainstream American portrayal of a pro-Palestinian point of view (I think DS9 wound up sort of downplaying the allegory, but it was pretty clear in the original presentation).
http://yglesias.thinkprogress.org/ar...-ensign-ro.php

Star Trek: Another franchise that gets things terribly wrong, but never the less, serves a critical function of science fiction; it covers modern sensitive ethical dilemmas in a fresh view of metaphor. You could probably teach ethics via Star Trek! In the sum of five series, I’ve seen them cover, to name a few, nuclear war, race relations, homosexuality, and the Israeli occupation of Palestine. (Re: the Cardassian occupation of Bajor on Deep Space Nine.)
http://astroguyz.com/2008/06/26/sci-...he-alien-ugly/

Editorial Reviews
Amazon.com
Star Trek: The Next Generation presents its take on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict by introducing the dispute between Cardassians and the displaced Bajoran people, a dispute that would later become the basis of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. Ever since the Cardassians annexed the Bajoran home world four decades prior, there has been trouble with terrorism, but now the terrorism is starting to affect Federation ships. Captain Picard has been ordered to find the Arafat-like rebel leader Orta (Jeffrey Hayenga), the man who's been blamed for the latest terrorist attack. Assigned to assist him on this mission is Ensign Ro (the surly and talented Michelle Forbes), a Bajoran ex-Starfleet officer who is hated by everyone because of an incident that happened when she was serving on the Wellington, where she disregarded orders and got several crew members killed. Of course, she's just as reluctant to serve on the Enterprise, but does so because it's better than prison--barely.
http://www.amazon.com/Star-Trek-Gene.../dp/630417957X

The episode also introduces the Bajorans and their conflict with the Cardassians. The story will be a focal point of the early DS9 episodes. It is only touched on here and in a couple other TNG episodes. I am just as much a fan of the pre-Dominion War DS9 episodes as when the main storyline took over the series, so I have to give credit to “Ensign Ro” for laying the groundwork. There is a lot of speculation who the Bajorans represent: Jews in the ’40’s, Palestinians, Kurds, or even gypsies. Their status in historical context is not the main focus of the episode, so the social commentary is not as heavy-handed as one might expect Trek to indulge in.
http://jeffords.blogspot.com/2009/10...ensign-ro.html

Cardassians- Nazi Germany (Mostly in regards to their Occupation of Bajor. But in some regards it is what would have happened if WW 2 was a stalemate instead of an allied victory.)

* Bajorans- Jewish/ Palestinian (Specifically the very religious people suffering through an oppressive military force. Though Cardassians are certainly never, ever Israeli)
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/StarTrek


It is never made clear whether the Cardassians are more "authoritarian" (e.g., like the more typical Western colonial administration of "backward" lands), or "totalitarian" (e.g., like the occupation of Poland by Nazi Germany during World War II). The more "reactionary" Bajorans, however, are predictably condemned, as for example in an episode that alluded to a Bajoran "racist" organization, who wanted "off-worlders off Bajor." Kai Wynn, one of the leading "traditionalists," was shown as increasingly, outrightly, evil. The liberal stereotypes about the Jerry Falwells of our own world were thereby again vindicated. The Bajorans were also termed in current-day chatter about the show as "the Palestinians of the 24th century" -- a comment that caused some embarrassment, taking into account the analogous identity of the rather hideous and evil Cardassian occupiers.
http://www.enterstageright.com/archi...startrekp1.htm


OldManDax wrote: View Post
I know that a lot of time we as viewers, and Trek itself, uses Nazism as its reference point for its narratives of occupation, oppression, genocide, inhuman political actions, etc. But i'd like to reference something closer to home and the American experience than the German Nazism: American chattel slavery and post-emancipation defacto segregation.

I'd imagine you are aware that many, many slaveholders sired children through their female slaves. That women and girls were routinely raped and/or made proto "comfort women". That many were forced to raise or serve as nursemaids for the illegitimate children of slaveholders. This stuff was pretty much par for the course, and contrary, to the often reflexive anthropology employed among many liberal/rationalist types, these violators of women's bodies were not simply uneducated hicks and rednecks who were merely acting by impulse and a kind of wild-eyed non-thinking racism, but often wealthy, and well-heeled persons who were acting within accepted social mores of their particular society - even the mores accepted within "polite society" (one manifestation of this was that teenage sons of slaveholders were expected to "sow their wild oats" with slave girls and eventually, create offspring with them, although of course those offspring could never be treated like full children). Slavery was above else, a system of economic exploitation, one that mde many of its participants very, very wealthy.

And the various rationales to the ongoing sexual exploitation of black females: not only that they were the property of their owners, yes, but also that by doing this, they were actually doing the slaves a kind of existential favor, since their were children would now have the "privilege" of having white blood, lighter skin, more caucasian hair and facial features, etc. In fact, just the fact that a white man touched the slaves and took sexual interest in them was supposed to be an unmitigated good, since of course white blood was inherently superior to that of blacks. Remember that during that time, there was a entire social, political, and historical paradigm that deemed blacks as not only subhuman, but also incapable of building and/or maintaining any kind of civilization or lasting achievements. Africans were deemed to have the an intellectual, social and moral capacity as just about that of apes. Thus, slave women - as well as the men who watched as their wives and daughters were brutalized, kidnapped and made, umm, comfort women - were deemed as fortunate to have to have their captors take interest in them, and "purify" their "inferior" blood.

Of course, whenever these kinds of behaviors are deeply integrated into any kind of cultural landscape, those who have been victimized by that system can also become victimizers, and kind of perversely take on the logic of their oppressors, yet another variation of "Stockholm Syndrome". Thus, there became a fair number of black slaveholders, who were sometimes known to engage in the same practices as their white progenitors in that system. A good narrative telling of this phenomenon is in the novel and film "The Color Purple". In that fim (and obviously, the novel) the character played by Danny Glover ("Mister"), is pretty much, in most ways, a beast, though even HE is given some grey, some color to his character (and has what is in my opinion one of the most sublime and moving redemption for the character towards the end). Note that he treats the Whoopi Goldberg character ("Celie") in a perfunctory manner, there for his own use (though at times, the film shows that there can be a strange emotional connection and even functional alliance between the two); he verbally abuses and degrades the Oprah Winfrey character ("Sophia"), he flatters and lies to the Margaret Avery character ("Shug Avery") - and oh, he RAPES the Akosua Busia character ("Nettie", the younger sister of Celie). He also sires two of her children, and then sends her away. All the while, he's acting in ways that could be accepted in polite society, and in ways that were inherited tradition/ritual in the South during that time. Cardassia, anyone?

I've also known someone like this in my own family - my grandfather. He was born and reared in the South - and most definitely inherited many of the worst inclinations of his society. He was a philanderer: as with many women from her generation, black and white, my grandmother was forced to tolerate his various extramarital "affairs" and wanderings. He was something of a pedophile - targeting pubescent girls as soon as they started umm, "blooming". He could be verbally cruel - he would target enemies and opposers, perceived and otherwise, with a high degree of vitriol and viciuousness, so as to reduce them to tears.

And oh yes, he was a rapist - though not of the "hide-in-the-bushes-and-wait-to-the woman-is-home-alone" sort. No, he was what was known as an acquaintance rapist, often using charm and charisma and emotional manipulation to cause his prey to be trusting, or at least feel "safe" with him before he performed his despicable acts. Dukat, anyone?

Yet, according to many who knew him (including one of his past "conquests") he was also given to exceptional charisma, wit and often, an uncanny ability to navigate and make the most of various social, political and military circles (among, other things he was a decorated WWII vet). He was fairly well-spoken, and, even within the racist circles he often encountered, was often able to obtain positions of influence and acclaim within his community and some social organizations. Heck, he was even given to organizing all kinds of "good works" for the communities in which he lived, organizing block parties and gift giveaways to the various children within the community, who would then, along with their grateful families of course, shower him with adoration and affirmation. Sound like anyone?

Know what else? Both my mother and her sister have said that he NEVER touched them sexually and was, in many ways, a loving, protective father, though his actions against their mother and others (he could have a vicious temper) certainly created a lot of emotional instability which even today has had residual effects. And my mom told me that she knew that he would go postal if anyone had ever laid a hand a hand on her or my aunt - and in fact once almost killed a man who attempted to do just that. And despite their despising of the things he had done, my mom and her sister (along with my three uncles) most certainly loved their father. He was, after all, their father.

Ziyal, anyone?
http://trekbbs.com/showpost.php?p=3349967&postcount=79[/QUOTE]
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Old April 15 2010, 10:52 PM   #10
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

Withers wrote: View Post
The Bajorans were varied. They weren't all "Honor, honor, honor," "Money, Money, Money," "Logic, Logic, Logic." Sure, they were spiritual, but that wasn't the only thing ever defined about them and wasn't what identified a Bajoran
This.

I voted Yay. The Bajorans are easily one of my favorite races in Trek, and an example of an alien race done correctly. They weren't just a parody or example of some aspect of real life humanity.

Too Much Fun wrote: View Post
the silly look (make-up)
Um, the make-up for Bajorans was probably the most understated of any alien make-up in Trek history. The only times the make-up was less was when an alien race was EXACTLY identical-looking to Humans. If any DS9 character had "silly" make-up, it was Odo - they just plastered his face flat.
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Old April 15 2010, 11:06 PM   #11
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

Admiral Shran wrote: View Post
Withers wrote: View Post
The Bajorans were varied. They weren't all "Honor, honor, honor," "Money, Money, Money," "Logic, Logic, Logic." Sure, they were spiritual, but that wasn't the only thing ever defined about them and wasn't what identified a Bajoran
This.

I voted Yay. The Bajorans are easily one of my favorite races in Trek, and an example of an alien race done correctly. They weren't just a parody or example of some aspect of real life humanity.
This is also the reason why I like them. There was so much variation among Bajoran characters. Here's my earlier thread/OP where I explained why I like them.
http://trekbbs.com/showthread.php?t=101855

Also, not every Bajoran was religious/spiritual - Ro Laren wasn't, and Tahna Los didn't seem to care about destroying the "Celestial Temple", so I am pretty sure he wasn't, either. (Which proves that it's perfectly possible to be a nationalistic Bajoran without being religious.)

Admiral Shran wrote: View Post
Too Much Fun wrote: View Post
the silly look (make-up)
Um, the make-up for Bajorans was probably the most understated of any alien make-up in Trek history. The only times the make-up was less was when an alien race was EXACTLY identical-looking to Humans. If any DS9 character had "silly" make-up, it was Odo - they just plastered his face flat.
Well, one might say that it was silly in the sense that every alien who looked almost like a human is "silly", i.e. it's unlikely they would look that way - which would also mean that Vulcans, Trill, Betazoids, Deltans, Ocampa, TOS Romulans, most aliens encountered in TOS, etc. are "silly".

But if it means "silly" as in bad-looking, fake-looking, or silly-looking, I don't think so, and I can think of many much sillier looking races in Trek. How about the Kazon, or these guys , or how about these, or or maybe these ?
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Old April 15 2010, 11:08 PM   #12
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

I loved them. The setting of Bajor and the people who lived there were a crucial part of DS9 for me.
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Old April 15 2010, 11:45 PM   #13
LitmusDragon
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

At the time it was airing I thought all the political stuff was boring. Now that I'm older I quite enjoy it, and the Bajorans as well.
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Old April 16 2010, 01:06 AM   #14
Dick1979
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

Zameaze wrote: View Post
Bajorans are Jews, Cardassians are Nazis--what would happen if they were forced to work together? Boring, boring, boring.
It's funny you should make that comparrison. I too have drawn the same parallels between these two species. As a
Matter of fact I have compared each major species in the Trekverse to that of our world. It's goes as fallows:

USA = The Federation
china = Vulcan
Japan = Romulan
Russia = Klingon
Euro Union = Trill, Betazed, Andor

Okay, bring on the heat.
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Old April 16 2010, 01:07 AM   #15
Zameaze
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Re: Bajorans - yay or nay

Withers wrote: View Post
Zameaze wrote: View Post
Bajorans are Jews, Cardassians are Nazis--what would happen if they were forced to work together? Boring, boring, boring.

There's a term for this (literally); it's called dramatic conflict....
Yes there is, and it certainly has nothing to do with with this unoriginal, banal, and jejune idea of putting a cat and a dog together in a bag to see what happens.
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