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Science and Technology "Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known." - Carl Sagan.

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Old December 18 2013, 05:16 PM   #76
DarthTom
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

Interesting article on CNN website I read about today related to this:

"'Neil," must be Hal and Sal's grandfather. LOL

CNN
The Never Ending Image Learner ("NEIL" to its friends) looks at millions of images on the Web, identifying and labeling them. For example, it might recognize a famous building, an animal's eye or a color. It then groups images together in categories, and automatically looks for associations between them, without human supervision.
"Images also include a lot of common-sense information about the world. People learn this by themselves and, with NEIL, we hope that computers will do so as well," said Abhinav Gupta, an assistant research professor at Carnegie Mellon.
The team decided that images were the best place to start their quest for common sense connections, in part because of the vast selection and variety of images available online.
"No one writes common-sense relationships, such as sheep are white or cars have wheels, and therefore it is hard to gather these relationships from sources such as text," Gupta told CNN.
Each examined image is another puzzle piece. Since July NEIL has analyzed more than 5 million images and come up with 3,000 relationships – a small percentage, but a start. The program might make connections between an object and a location, deducing for example that Ferris wheels are often found in amusement parks, or that a zebras are found on savannas.
The program, funded in part by Google, runs 24/7 on two clusters of computers that include 200 processing cores. Someday soon NEIL may begin analyzing video imagery as well.
"People don't always know how or what to teach computers," said Abhinav Shrivastava, a graduate student working on the project. "But humans are good at telling computers when they are wrong."

Last edited by DarthTom; December 18 2013 at 05:35 PM.
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Old December 18 2013, 08:23 PM   #77
Rhubarbodendron
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

wow, that's an interesting article. Thanks for posting it! I particularly love the last paragraph
It'll be interesting to see how Neil develops.

Edit_XYZ wrote: View Post
In my opinion, a machine cannot be called intelligent until it is proven to be creative. Until now, no such proof is forthcoming.
Always, the output from a computer does not contain more than what was put in; the output is, at most, applications of the general principles inputted.
*gasp* I find myself agreeing with you! My fever must be worse than I thought
LOL no, please don't be offended, Edit! I was just making fun of myself.
It's cool that we have finally found a topic we agree on. That calls for a celebration! *rolls in a barrel of Bavarian beer*
Cease fire? Please? *holds out hand at Edit*
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Old December 19 2013, 02:22 AM   #78
scotpens
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

Will all these advances in image recognition, maybe someday Photobucket's censorship software will be able to recognize the difference between actual naked boobs and almost-naked boobs.
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Old December 19 2013, 12:55 PM   #79
Rhubarbodendron
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

that would at least be a positive use. I can imagine a few less pleasant ones.
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Old December 19 2013, 04:45 PM   #80
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

Spirit of Christmas Present wrote: View Post
[...] *holds out hand at Edit*
*shakes hand*

I would be interested in your thoughts on the latter part of my previous post from this thread. It has more substance than the part you quoted.
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Old December 20 2013, 08:38 AM   #81
Rhubarbodendron
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

I deliberately didn't comment on the second half of your post because there are a few expressions I have to look up first and didn't get around to yet (the usual last week before holidays chaos at work, Christmas party at office, last minute cookie baking and suitcase packing - I'll drive to my parents on Sunday noon. Plus my dictionary weighs 8 lbs...).
I'll look them all up tonight and then try to say something halfways intelligent. Promise!

ETA: sorry that I gave you an overkill with botanical and zoological names in that other post (re: Si use in terrestrial life). Being a biologist, I have a pretty unfair advantage of you in that field.
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Old December 20 2013, 03:25 PM   #82
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

Spirit of Christmas Present wrote: View Post
I'll drive to my parents on Sunday noon. Plus my dictionary weighs 8 lbs...).
You post from a computer on the TrekBBS, obviously have internet access, but still use a paper dictionary to look up word references?

Online Urban dictionary

Online dictionary of obscure or unusual references

Merriam-Webster online dictionary
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Old December 21 2013, 08:00 AM   #83
Rhubarbodendron
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Re: Is Watson the most advanced super computer in existence?

As a general rule I indeed prefer a printed dictionary because translation software has the unfortunate tendency to always pick the wrong one if a word has several meanings. A brain is more reliable in that instance.
As for the links you provided (thank you! ) : to find such a dictionary one has to know the correct keywords to enter into the search engine. Else the situation is a little bit like explaining to a blind what yellow looks like. (Which reminds me - but this is totally off-topic - we used to have a poster here named "blind groping". Haven't seen him in years. Anyone of the senior members here know what happened to him?)

Edit_XYZ wrote: View Post
An interesting information - all computers are Turing machines, always self-consistent.
The human mind is not always self-consistent, but can entertain inconsistent ideas without becoming useless - considering every statement, no matter how contradictory, provable/correct. This should be impossible - or, at least, no one has any idea how to replicate this performance with a machine:
http://www.leaderu.com/truth/2truth08.html
Note - one of the conclusions of the 'Godel's proof' argument used by J.R. Lucas is that, in order to 'understand' the concept of truth, one must be, at least in part, inconsistent. Perhaps 'understanding', in general, requires one to be partly inconsistent.
No self-consistent Turing machine can understand said concept, escaping its informational system.
I am not familiar with Turing machines (had to look them up) but from what I read I understand that a Turing machine is a mathematical model that simulates a computer's "way of thinking". While I agree that they both work in the same way (after all, what use would a simulation be if it was inaccurate?) I wouldn't go so far as to reverse the order and say computers are Turing machines. I may be overly careful in this case but I keep remembering that example a Greek philosopher made: if a human is defined as a naked, 2-legged creature, a plucked chicken would under that definition count as a human. Therefore I am always extremely careful about reversing conclusions.

I agree about computers being self-consistent. They can not do anything that goes contrary to their programmes.

With humans the matter is complicated and has been discussed by philosophers and biologists for the last 3 milennia. Admittedly, people occasionally do things that seem out of character. But only because we can't imagine a person might do something, doesn't necessarily mean it's not somewhere in their character range after all. Maybe it was there all the time, only dormant because it was not yet needed? It is a very difficult and controversial matter that basically rests on the question: how do we think? As long as the mechanical and biochemical mechanisms are not completely known, we can only speculate.
Therefore it is currently rather a matter of faith whether you believe that humans can deviate from their programming or not.

At the moment we are surely better than computers at combining informations and finding connections between seemingly unconnected things. This helps us finding solutions for problems we encounter for the first time. We have encountered different problems in the past and use our experience to analyze the new problem, divide it up into handy subproblems and solve them one by one.
(off-topic: that mechanism was what I meant in the suicide thread when I said that parents should not clear their kids' path from all obstacles but rather teach them how one attacks and solves problems. If they are familiar with overcoming obstacles, it gives them a better chance to deal with problems later without panicking.)

In order to teach computers how to be creative and find unlikely or unexpected solutions, we must first find out how we ourselves do it. This might take a while since for ethical reasons your possibilities of experimenting on living human brains are rather limited. There are quite promising attempts with nervous tissue cell cultures, though, but they have only the basic (mechanical) abilities and - for all we know - no intelligence and creativity. Unfortunately, physiological research goes very much slower than IT development. So, atm we biologists are like an iron ball chained to the computer specialist's ankles.
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