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Trek Literature "...Good words. That's where ideas begin."

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Old February 15 2014, 08:23 PM   #196
Sci
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Re: The Past Decade of Trek Lit

Christopher wrote: View Post
j3067 wrote: View Post
^If DRG3 had a fraction of Kirsten Beyer's talent in writing that kind of personal story then maybe this would not be coming up so often and that continuation would have been clear.
Go back and read the comments made when RBoE first came out, and you'll see that to many readers, myself included, it was clear at the time that the book represented the beginning of a new arc -- that it was parallelling "Emissary," starting a new character journey for Sisko by putting him in a dark place like where he'd been in the series pilot. I mean, this was the first DS9 novel set in the post-Destiny era, so it was pretty clear to me that it was intended as the beginning of a new storyline. I've never understood the reactions of readers who assumed it was the end of Sisko's journey or something. Why would they bring DS9 back for only one book?
Because, to be frank, some just have very poor reading comprehension skills.
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Old February 15 2014, 09:19 PM   #197
Jedi Ben
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Re: The Past Decade of Trek Lit

For myself I can't emphasise enough how much of a game-changer that 2-parter PoN / RtD was. I bought them due to reception they were getting here, having found ZSG OK but that was about it.

At the time the post-Destiny Trekverse was, understandably, pretty grim. While I really liked the attention to detail in considering the sheer destructive impact of the Borg's invasion, there's a limit to how much I want of that. Unfortunately, if the success of Game of Thrones and others is anything to go by, lots of people like to wallow in that. I'm not that audience, but could well see it as a likely direction to go in. RBoE on its own would have only underlined this, but I didn't read that as a standalone, I had that pair prepped on the shelf!

The duo went and did what I had never contemplated - they flipped everything on its head. They showed a battered but recovering Federation, a belligerent but not stupidly destructive Typhon Pact, particularly the Romulans. Where another series would have used the events here to kick off a new war, the books went in entirely the opposite direction, even being able to render Kamenor's diplomatic gambit with Bacco exciting. That's quite an accomplishment right there.

In effect, while showing the effects of the Borg invasion would linger, to invoke Picard's line in Peaceable Kingdoms, they showed that the stories now and onwards would not be dominated or defined by them. It scaled back the doom 'n' gloom, didn't end the threats but opened the door to managing them.

So in conclusion, I don't think anyone would doubt there'd be a continuation of the story after RBoE, but I don't think anyone could have predicted the surprising nature of the continuation.
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Old February 15 2014, 10:31 PM   #198
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Re: The Past Decade of Trek Lit

Christopher wrote: View Post
j3067 wrote: View Post
^If DRG3 had a fraction of Kirsten Beyer's talent in writing that kind of personal story then maybe this would not be coming up so often and that continuation would have been clear.
Go back and read the comments made when RBoE first came out, and you'll see that to many readers, myself included, it was clear at the time that the book represented the beginning of a new arc -- that it was parallelling "Emissary," starting a new character journey for Sisko by putting him in a dark place like where he'd been in the series pilot. I mean, this was the first DS9 novel set in the post-Destiny era, so it was pretty clear to me that it was intended as the beginning of a new storyline. I've never understood the reactions of readers who assumed it was the end of Sisko's journey or something. Why would they bring DS9 back for only one book?
To answer your last question, with one word: Ascendents.

I doubt any of us thought that DS9 was intentionally only being brought back for one book. But I think many of us were very conscious of the way storylines can and sometimes are just dropped in TrekLit, for real-world reasons. With the DS9 line, of course, the most frustrating example of this was the cessation following The Soul Key, which has left us, to this day, without a firm resolution to the Ascendents storyline.

And it's not just The Soul Key that's been left unresolved. Since then, we've seen Fallen Gods go without a direct follow-up. Before that, the Rihannsu books went a long time without resolution, and my understanding is that it was for a long time not a sure thing that such a resolution would ever be published. So it was plausible that RBoE would suffer a similar fate, particularly since DS9 has for a while now appeared to be the red-headed stepchild of the TrekLit line.

I think the reaction against Rough Beasts of Empire was partly motivated by fear that we never would get a follow-up, or that we would, but only after a very long time, and that, potentially, the final word on Sisko would be very depressing indeed.

Now, don't get me wrong. I think the reaction was inappropriate in its extreme nature, and I think that DRGIII endured way too much vitriol on this board for the book. But I also think it's worth understanding why we saw the reaction that we did.
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Old February 15 2014, 11:05 PM   #199
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Re: The Past Decade of Trek Lit

Paper Moon wrote: View Post
I think the reaction against Rough Beasts of Empire was partly motivated by fear that we never would get a follow-up, or that we would, but only after a very long time, and that, potentially, the final word on Sisko would be very depressing indeed.

Now, don't get me wrong. I think the reaction was inappropriate in its extreme nature, and I think that DRGIII endured way too much vitriol on this board for the book. But I also think it's worth understanding why we saw the reaction that we did.
Okay, that's understandable. Still, if that's the basis for the reaction, then it's misplaced criticism to accuse DRGIII himself of intending to make Sisko a deadbeat dad, as if this were supposed to be the final event of his story forevermore. I felt it was always clear that it was meant to be a personal and emotional setback that he'd need to grow beyond, just as he grew beyond his depression and fixation on the past in "Emissary." Sisko is unlike any other Trek lead, except Pike and Abramsverse Kirk, in that he was introduced at one of the darkest points of his life, so that his story was about his personal recovery and redemption. To me, it was always clear that RBoE was meant to recapitulate that process, that it was starting Sisko out at a bad place so that he could outgrow it.
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Old February 16 2014, 01:14 AM   #200
Paper Moon
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Re: The Past Decade of Trek Lit

Christopher wrote: View Post
Paper Moon wrote: View Post
I think the reaction against Rough Beasts of Empire was partly motivated by fear that we never would get a follow-up, or that we would, but only after a very long time, and that, potentially, the final word on Sisko would be very depressing indeed.

Now, don't get me wrong. I think the reaction was inappropriate in its extreme nature, and I think that DRGIII endured way too much vitriol on this board for the book. But I also think it's worth understanding why we saw the reaction that we did.
Okay, that's understandable. Still, if that's the basis for the reaction, then it's misplaced criticism to accuse DRGIII himself of intending to make Sisko a deadbeat dad, as if this were supposed to be the final event of his story forevermore. I felt it was always clear that it was meant to be a personal and emotional setback that he'd need to grow beyond, just as he grew beyond his depression and fixation on the past in "Emissary." Sisko is unlike any other Trek lead, except Pike and Abramsverse Kirk, in that he was introduced at one of the darkest points of his life, so that his story was about his personal recovery and redemption. To me, it was always clear that RBoE was meant to recapitulate that process, that it was starting Sisko out at a bad place so that he could outgrow it.
Yeah, I agree that it's misplaced criticism.

That said, though: people are more likely to misplace their criticism when they get upset. In fact, I think a significant majority of the criticism DRGIII received about RBoE was just readers trying find reasons to justify their emotional reactions, even if only to themselves. (Stuff like this happens all the time– if you embarrass someone by pointing out something they did wrong, you're likely to get a range of very loud and equally ludicrous arguments about how what they did wasn't wrong after all. It's just about saving face.)

Very keen analysis about Sisko and the recapitulation that occurred in RBoE. I think it's an interesting angle to play on him, but I do wish, to a certain degree, that a different direction had been taken. A story of Sisko's recovery and redemption was already told, on the show. I'd love to have seen Sisko renavigating young parenthood, how that interacts with having a grown child already, how it's different from when he was a junior officer, etc.
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Old February 21 2014, 04:32 AM   #201
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Re: The Past Decade of Trek Lit

I just finished "Paths of Disharmony" the TNG Andorian novel. I'm afraid I couldn't really get into this one. Maybe it's because I haven't read any of the DS9/Andorian stories, or the Vanguard series, but I wasn't that interested in the whole Andorian storyline. It also didn't help that the "bad guys" were just activists who weren't really threatening anyone. Or that the Typhon Pact involvement was very indirect. Or that one computer expert was able to take over the entire Enterprise-E.
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